Discussion
Started 27th Aug, 2022

What do you think are the key factors that could trigger a food crisis in your country?

What do you think are the key factors that could trigger a food crisis in your country in the next quarters and/or years?
Due to many different factors, a food crisis can develop in many countries. The international supply and supply logistics chains that were interrupted during the SARS-CoV-2 (Covid-19) coronavirus pandemic have not been fully rebuilt. Rising fuel prices are driving up the cost of transporting food products to shops. The decline in fertiliser production is also driving up the cost of producing crops. In addition, the war in Ukraine has resulted in a decline in cereal supplies to many countries. The lack of electricity has caused a decline in the production of nitrogenous fertilisers. This then caused a decrease in the production of CO2, which benefits producers of many types of food products. Many food product factories are raising the prices of their products due to increases in raw material, energy and fuel prices. Many production facilities are reducing the scale of production. There may be job cuts. Consumption is falling due to high inflation. If a downturn in the economy occurs in the next quarters, many companies may go out of business and unemployment will rise. In addition, periods of increasingly severe drought, more and more hot days and less and less rain and more and more frequent fires in many parts of the world are causing a significant drop in crop production in agriculture. On the other hand, further food crises may arise in the future in the long term, which will be the result of a global climate crisis developing on a multi-year scale.
In view of the above, I address the following question to the esteemed community of researchers and scientists:
What do you think are the key factors that could trigger a food crisis in your country in the next quarters and/or years?
What should be done to reduce the scale of development of the food crisis?
What is your opinion on the subject?
What do you think about this topic?
Please reply,
I invite you all to discuss,
Thank you very much,
Regards,
Dariusz Prokopowicz

Most recent answer

16th Sep, 2022
Fanu Abimbola
Federal University Oye-Ekiti
Insecurity on the part of the rural households, national unrest.
1 Recommendation

All replies (6)

27th Aug, 2022
Emad Hawash
Cairo University
Dear Dr Prokopowicz
Thank you for starting this important discussion. In E. G Ypt, they are (all) almost human factors: 1. undefined priorities by decision makers, 2. control/monopolizing fertilizer sources, and 3. high fuel prices for the irrigation and the transportation sectors.
27th Aug, 2022
Willi Glettig
LCC Engineering & Trading GmbH
Dear Dariusz
I dare to assert that all epigenetic factors may initiate a food crisis (Social interaction, war, disease, financial, created deficiencies etc.) More important is to have strategies to contain an emerging problem so that it will not spread globally. To avoid that we formed the UNO. In the post war era we also created the global market. Unfortunately, this is an economic concept that is based on competition and the winner in competition are those with with power. Now we are witnessing the global economy is dividing and consolidating in blocks. Unfortunately, the blocksformation is permananentl restructured and driven by a few war mongers. For them power is more important than food for the global citizen.
Many people are afraid and believe that we have too many people on the globe. For them war is the preferred mode to assure access to food. They cant imagine that with innovation and new circulatory technologies it is possible to multiply food supply. Food shortage is always a distribution problem. There are many actors around that increase value through shortage. The alternative is entrepreneurial collaboration with advanced technologies to assure a very large diversity of healthy food, enhanced with free global trade via internet. Science has failed to convince taxpayer that with sustainable technologies we will always have enough food for everybody.
2 Recommendations
27th Aug, 2022
Var St. Jeor
St. Jeor Enterprises
Socialism!
28th Aug, 2022
Anna Ponomarenko
National University of Kyiv-Mohyla Academy
Russia's invasion of Ukraine: burning agricultural fields, mining the territory of Ukraine, stealing Ukrainian grain, the involvement of Ukrainian agronomists in cooperation with the occupiers etc.!!!
14th Sep, 2022
Rajni Gupta
University of Delhi
According to me large population, lack of awareness, Ukraine war are the main key factors for crisis of food.
1 Recommendation
16th Sep, 2022
Fanu Abimbola
Federal University Oye-Ekiti
Insecurity on the part of the rural households, national unrest.
1 Recommendation

Similar questions and discussions

How can the development of the food crisis be reduced?
Discussion
16 replies
  • Dariusz ProkopowiczDariusz Prokopowicz
The decline in agricultural production and exports in many countries is pushing up food prices. The scale of food shortages will increase in many countries and the risk of a food crisis is growing. More and more data confirms that after the recent pandemic economic crisis 2020, the growing economic crisis caused by high inflation, the developing energy crisis in 2023, there will also be a food crisis in many parts of the world. In the current 2022, a number of factors have simultaneously emerged that could lead to a food crisis and hunger in many countries of the world. These include the following factors:
1. the war in Ukraine (production and exports of cereals and other agricultural crops from Russia and Ukraine have fallen significantly).
2. Record heat, drought, forest and crop field fires in many parts of the world (in India, record heat reaching 50 ct. C in the shade; drought throughout the western states of the USA; in central and eastern Africa the worst drought in 40 years).
3. Flooding of farmland in China in 2021 (30 million acres of farmland under water. Chinese authorities have announced that the 2022 crop yield could be the lowest in the context of the previous few decades).
4. postcovid broken chains of international logistics and supplies.
5. in 2020, the Lebanese capital Beirut suffered a gigantic explosion at the port that destroyed all infrastructure, including huge grain silos.
For these and other reasons, the number of people in the world at risk of hunger has increased by 80 per cent in the last five years, from 108 million to 183 million people.
After Vladimir Putin ordered 200,000 Russian troops into Ukraine, the global food situation went from poor to bad. Especially this negative trend is developing in poor countries, where economies are underdeveloped and income levels of citizens are also low.
Before the war, Ukraine was the 5th economy in terms of global wheat exports, 3rd in barley exports, 3rd in maize exports and 1st in oilseed exports (e.g. sunflower). In Ukraine, areas of fertile chernozem extend as far as Manzuria. Before the war, Ukraine produced 9 per cent of the world's wheat, and together with Russia, this is now 30 per cent. Ukraine generated 20 per cent of the world's maize exports. By contrast, Ukraine's exports of sunflower oil account for as much as 75 per cent of the global share. Food exports from Ukraine are also estimated at 1/8 of all calories sold globally. Most of these exports before the war, i.e. before 24 February 2022, were loaded onto ships in Odessa and Novorossiysk and transported to the Middle East and elsewhere in the world. The war has created serious problems for food production and export in Ukraine. The Russians have blockaded the Black Sea ports with their Black Sea fleet.
In view of the above, I address the following question to the honourable community of scientists and researchers:
How can the scale of the development of the food crisis be reduced?
What is your opinion on this topic?
Please reply,
I invite you all to discuss,
Thank you very much,
Regards,
Dariusz Prokopowicz

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