Question
Asked 20th Jan, 2019

What are the means of decreasing the burnout levels at work, medical schools and stressful environments?

Burnout is a public health issue and concern that we deem as secondary yet has detrimental effects on one's health if not treated appropriately.

Most recent answer

1st Feb, 2019
Luís Arthur Brasil Gadelha Farias
Hospital São José de Doenças Infecciosas
Following the link for the article: https://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMp1813713
Best regards,

All Answers (14)

20th Jan, 2019
Christian G Meyer
Physician; independent researcher / consultant - infectious disease specialist - editor
Attentiveness and conscious stress reduction; wise use of digigital means and media. Some sort of meditation or conncentration exercises may be helpful.
21st Jan, 2019
Luís Arthur Brasil Gadelha Farias
Hospital São José de Doenças Infecciosas
Dear colleague,
The way to decrease the burnout levels in medical schools worldwide is still a challenge. The mental health of medical students has long been a cause for concern. Nowadays, this problem still persists.
I would like to suggest two articles which mentions some strategies that could help, although the theme is vast and there is still a lot to know. Strategies to increase resilience may be helpful.
hope i could help,
Best regards,
1 Recommendation
21st Jan, 2019
Emmanuel Ifeanyi Obeagu
Michael Okpara University of Agriculture, Umudike
Dear burnout and stressful environment can be reduced by a good planning, being focused and having enough rest. A very good regular exercise and drinking sufficient good water will help.
22nd Jan, 2019
Afroz Jahan
North South University
It’s reduced by trying to remove tension in life, keep peaceful mind , trying to do regular physical exercise & take low cholesterol & high fibre diet, fresh drinking water regularly .
22nd Jan, 2019
Nelma Pintor
Universidade Estácio de Sá
Eu penso que é possível reduzir por meio de um trabalho de humanização no contexto do hospital. Com o desenvolvimento de empatia entre os agentes e profissionais de saúde e educação.
23rd Jan, 2019
Mustafa Altannir
Alfaisal University
Christian G Meyer can you kindly be more specific?
Nelma Pintor I do agree that empathy in the working environment can help yet burnout is harmful on the personal level by so many means; are you aware of various strategies or techniques that have yielded optimal or close to optimal results?
Luís Arthur Brasil Gadelha Farias Thanks for the guidance! Will have a look at the 2 recommended studies.
Emmanuel Ifeanyi Obeagu The tips you have provided are indeed helpful yet these are very general. I need more in-depth strategies if you may...
1 Recommendation
23rd Jan, 2019
Ambika Khanal
Institute of Crisis Management Studies
Sharing with the friends, regular exercises, meditation, mindfulness technique. Provide stress management training to staff at regular basis, provide cooperative environment during stressful situations.
24th Jan, 2019
James Mink
George Washington University
Teaching students resilience-awareness and engagement skills as early as possible in school programs, which should continue at whatever vocation they choose. Hospitals should have these trainings, as well as promoting an environment of mindfulness and sharing. Burnout and clinician suicides drop when they work in an environment where they feel like they can share their frustration, as well as where seeing a therapist isn't something that goes on their licence.
1 Recommendation
25th Jan, 2019
Mustafa Altannir
Alfaisal University
James Mink That is a very valid point you are raising there yet the question asks itself: Are these colleges/institutions and hospitals forming and building training programs and appropriate counselling to accommodate for the daily frustration these clinicians face?
It would be very intriguing to know of whether such strategies are already implemented on a large scale globally or not.
25th Jan, 2019
James Mink
George Washington University
Globally, no. It's happening slowly, and it's happening in siloed systems. There are a few organizations that are doing good work: American Foundation for Suicide Prevention talks to medical students and hospitals, and the American Medical Association launched a Burnout Initiative a few years back. However, it is only moving as fast as culture shifts, which in the world of medicine, is about as slow as anything.
26th Jan, 2019
Mustafa Altannir
Alfaisal University
James, thank you for that valuable feedback. It will take time yet the setup to combat burnout will be established.
30th Jan, 2019
Luís Arthur Brasil Gadelha Farias
Hospital São José de Doenças Infecciosas
Recently, an article from New England Journal of Medicine state that " The most commonly cited reasons for burnout — increased paperwork, more quality metrics, and less time with patients" would be the factors for burnout.
Please read the full article. It is really interesting.
Hope i could help,
Regards,
31st Jan, 2019
Mustafa Altannir
Alfaisal University
Luis, your tips are vastly appreciated! Thank you for your kind contribution...
1 Recommendation
1st Feb, 2019
Luís Arthur Brasil Gadelha Farias
Hospital São José de Doenças Infecciosas
Following the link for the article: https://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMp1813713
Best regards,

Similar questions and discussions

What do you think we should do to create a global society that will be less vulnerable for future pandemics to occur?
Discussion
7 replies
  • Carijn BeumerCarijn Beumer
What do you think we should do to create a global society that will be less vulnerable for future pandemics to occur?
Magic Bullets?
Being right in the middle of the COVID-19 storm, everyone is hoping for a quick fix such as a vaccine. In his blog Martin Paul suggests that finding a magic bullet has the highest priority. We, the Global Health Team at Health Ethics and Society of Maastricht University, don’t want to question the priority of working on acute and effective medical solutions in itself, however, with regards to framing the crisis, some more nuances can be made. Do we really just have to sit and wait, complying to some frustrating public health measures, for the new Nobel Prize candidate, like Paul Ehrlich, or for any outbreak-movie-like-action-hero to valiantly save us from the invisible threat?
Simple solution
We all wish that they would exist, these magic bullets (simple solutions with extreme effectiveness). However, just as Bill Gates already abandoned this idea, we teach our Global Health students that they do not. Sadly, none of the solutions to health problems are in and of themselves magic or heroic. All medical interventions and technologies, whether drugs, vaccines, ventilators or diagnostics need daily human handwork (engaging relationships between healthcare workers, decision makers and patients) to function at all. If there is any magic at play, it is created through this human work and collaboration. This work shapes how these solutions are put to use and how effective they are in the end. Yet, this work is not prioritized or talked about when we search for magic bullets. Instead, the belief in magic bullets and their heroes leads to a single focus on targeted and vertical solutions to global health issues. Such vertical solutions are limited in scope and distributed unequally over populations defined by fuzzy and messy lines of affluence and access.
Magic bullet
Importantly, the belief in magic bullets and its effect on innovation processes is directing funding and attention away from other things that highly matter, such as focusing on the structural and causal issues that helped the virus spillover and spread into the human population at the first place. We have been warned long in advance by epidemiologists and environmentalists that - due to our high global connectivity and the ways in which we are disrupting ecosystems and exploiting wildlife and other animals - it was not a question if a pandemic would strike, but when it would strike. This also means that one imagined magic bullet against COVID-19 will not prevent the next zoonotic virus to spill over into the human world.
Large picture
We should address this crisis with urgent and immediate measures, yes. However, we should also emphasize the importance of not losing sight of addressing the more structural and systemic questions and issues that emerge if we look at the larger picture of this disease. Think for example of the need for the strengthening of health systems, of reducing inequalities that possibly exacerbate the effects of the virus in ways we do not yet understand, and of thoroughly questioning the way we are currently meddling recklessly with our planetary ecological health support system.
Sidekick
We should not just mention prevention and public health measures as if they were just a temporarily and frustrating sidekick of the hero with its bullet-gun. This would be following and promoting the strategy that averts attention from one of the most crucial questions raised by our present situation: what should we do to create a global society that will be less vulnerable for future pandemics to occur?
We need concerted efforts and interdisciplinary approaches, including the social sciences, to understand our current situation and to prepare ourselves for the future.
Carijn Beumer, Nora Engel, Alana Helberg-Proctor, Iris Fraikin, Ricky Janssen, Gonnie Klabbers, Anja Krumeich, Agnes Meershoek, Remco van de Pas, Avanti Wadugodapitiya: The Global Health Team at Health Ethics and Society of Maastricht University
Redactie - 01-Apr-2020 12:40

Related Publications

Article
Full-text available
Pramukhswami Medical College introduced an orientation course for new medical students. This seven day program titled Foundation Course presented the students with various learning experiences aimed at developing knowledge, skills and attitudes required for a medical professional. The evaluation of the program was rated as successful by a majority...
Article
Graham Edward Schofield was one of a small number chosen to sit the final MBBS six months early and so graduated at the age of 21. He then became house surgeon to Professor Grey Turner at the British Postgraduate Medical School at Hammersmith Hospital for six months. He joined the Royal Air Force Medical Service for three years and was posted ove...
Got a technical question?
Get high-quality answers from experts.