Question
Asked 17th Oct, 2014

What are the key points of difference between emulsifiers and stabilizers?

How are they differentiated?

Most recent answer

6th Jun, 2018
Ali Benhmidene
University of Gabès
Emulsifier Usages
· To assist in Fat dispersion
· To control Fat agglomeration
· To promote air incorporation
· To enable drier extrusion
· To increase smoothness / consistency
· To resist shrinkage on storage
Stabiliser Usages
· To increase mix viscosity
· To improve air incorporation
· To give body and texture
· To slow ice crystal formation
· To control meltdown
· To interact with proteins
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All Answers (10)

17th Oct, 2014
Szymon Strnad
University of Agriculture in Krakow
Stabilizer in chemistry is a substance you add to avoid any undesirable change in state of substances. Emulsifiers (known as emulgents), on the other hand, are substances which stabilize emulsions by increasing its stability.
19th Oct, 2014
Sobhan Savadkoohi
Hela Australia
Dear Mudasir
The term stabilizer, but also emulsifier, are clearly defined in food law (Directive 95/2/EC). Both type of substances have to be authorized before use. They are categorised as food additives. Authorised food additives are clearly defined substances which have to fulfil strict purity criteria and maximum levels are fixed to protect the consumer. Above all there must be a technological need for their use and a clear benefit to the consumer.
Stabilizers are substances which make it possible to maintain the physico-chemical state of a foodstuff; stabilizers include substances which enable the maintenance of a homogenous dispersion of two or more immiscible substances in a foodstuff and include also substances which stabilize, retain or intensify an existing colour of a foodstuff.
Emulsifiers are substances which make it possible to form or maintain a homogenous mixture of two or more immiscible phases such as oil and water in a foodstuff.
The purpose of these food additives is to maintain consistent texture and to prevent the separation of ingredients in such products as margarine, low-fat spreads and dairy products, ice cream, salad dressings and mayonnaise. Many reduced-fat and low-fat versions of common foods are dependent on this technology. Any recipe that requires the mixing of ingredients that normally do not mix, such as fat and water, need emulsifiers and stabilisers to impart and maintain the desired consistency. Examples include lecithin and mono- and digycerides. In dairy products for example pectin or calcium chloride are used.
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21st Oct, 2014
T.V. Sankar
Central Institute of Fisheries Technology
Stabilizers are substances which make it possible to maintain the physico-chemical properties of food material. Stabilisers enable maintaining a homogenous dispersion of two or more immiscible substances in a food and may include also substances which stabilize, retain or intensify an existing colour of a food material.
Emulsifiers are substances which make it possible to form or maintain a homogenous mixture of two or more immiscible phases such as oil and water in a food material.
These are food additives basically and are added to maintain consistency in texture and to prevent the separation of ingredients in such products as margarine, low-fat spreads and dairy products, ice cream, salad dressings etc. There are regulations in the use of food additives which need to be adhered to to while using the stabilizer or emulsifier for food applications.
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22nd Oct, 2014
Grazyna Lewandowicz
Poznań University of Life Sciences
All answers above are absolutely right. However the problem with emulsifiers and stabilizers is that these conceptions are often confused. Or more precisely some emulsifiers act as stabilizers, and vice versa some stabilizers act as emulsifiers. As a rule emulsifiers should reveal surface activity, while stabilizers – viscosity. However, it is possible that the substance which reveals surface activity is viscous. It is also possible that viscous substances reveal surface activity. Especially often it happens in case of modified starches . I can recommend you our paper: Prochaska K., Kędziora P., Le Thanh J., Lewandowicz G. 2007. Surface activity of commercial food grade modified starches. Colloids Surf. B: Biointerfaces, 60, 187-194. You can also read several excellent reviews by Dickinson.
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23rd Oct, 2014
Suraji Senanayake
University of Sri Jayewardenepura
Emulsifiers such as lecithin have both hydrophilic and hydrophobic ends and it can keep two imicible solvents in one phase by connecting with both water loving and water non loving parts of the solvents with the respective ends of the emulsifying substance. Stabilizers commonly act as thickeners such as CMC (carboxy methyl cellulose) mostly polysaccharides can bring suspending particles in a solvent into a continuous phase.
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30th Oct, 2014
Ahila Wani
Advanced Enzymes
Stabilizers are substances which make it possible to maintain the physico-chemical state of a foodstuff; stabilizers include substances which enable the maintenance of a homogenous dispersion of two or more immiscible substances in a foodstuff and include also substances which stabilize, retain or intensify an existing colour of a foodstuff.
Well, a stabilizer is something added to a chemical or product, or compound that inhibits changes in one or all. It's best not to say prevents, because that depends on the stabilizer and what it is used with. Sometimes, the two are one in the same, meaning they both perform the same functions.
Emulsifiers are substances which make it possible to form or maintain a homogenous mixture of two or more immiscible phases such as oil and water in a foodstuff.
An emulsifier is a chemical, or product, that keeps two or more other products/chemicals from separating, like when for instance, a creme sauce is made, even ice cream. Sometimes it's an organism. We often see "gum" listed on ingredients, and that is what it's used for. Egg yolk can be an emulsifier too - if we examine foods it's a bit easier than talking chemicals in the lab, but that's where everything can be proven.
The purpose of these food additives is to maintain consistent texture and to prevent the separation of ingredients in such products as margarine, low-fat spreads and dairy products, ice cream, salad dressings and mayonnaise. Many reduced-fat and low-fat versions of common foods are dependent on this technology. Any recipe that requires the mixing of ingredients that normally do not mix, such as fat and water, need emulsifiers and stabilisers to impart and maintain the desired consistency. Examples include lecithin and mono- and digycerides. In dairy products for example pectin or calcium chloride are used.
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10th Nov, 2014
Messiah Sarfarazi
Ferdowsi University Of Mashhad
Dear Mudasir
Please take a look at the following page:
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