Question
Asked 21st Apr, 2017

What is the composition of bird (waterfowl) droppings?

Please provide me references where I can get the answer.

Most recent answer

10th Mar, 2021
Sagar Adhurya
Kyung Hee University
HI all, please find my latest review work where you can find nutrient composition of different waterbird dropping:
(PDF) Guanotrophication by Waterbirds in Freshwater Lakes: A Review on Ecosystem Perspective (researchgate.net)
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All Answers (7)

22nd Apr, 2017
Arvind Singh
Banaras Hindu University
Please check the attached resources.
22nd Apr, 2017
Arvind Singh
Banaras Hindu University
24th Apr, 2017
Sagar Adhurya
Kyung Hee University
Thanks all!
12th May, 2017
Sarah Sabino
Ateneo de Manila University
Generally, waterfowl feces contain high amounts of phosphorus and nitrogen. In a study by Purcell et al. (1995), black-headed gulls (Larus ridibundus) were responsible for 53-72% of the total phosphorus output while snow geese (Chen caerulescens) accounted for a significant amount of nitrogen in the area. In wetlands, their feces contribute greatly to the nutrient requirements of algae that allows it to stimulate plant growth such as that of the macrophyte (Purcell 1999). However, waterfowl feces may also be the cause of eutrophication especially if they feed on land and excrete on water as this hastens the process.
Here are some useful links and publications.
27th Feb, 2018
Sagar Adhurya
Kyung Hee University
Thanks all
10th Mar, 2021
Sagar Adhurya
Kyung Hee University
HI all, please find my latest review work where you can find nutrient composition of different waterbird dropping:
(PDF) Guanotrophication by Waterbirds in Freshwater Lakes: A Review on Ecosystem Perspective (researchgate.net)
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