Discussion
Started 31st Mar, 2022

Using rewrite websites to write a review article

Hello!
i want to write a review article and in these kinds of articles you read so many articles and extract important parts of them and then you bring it in your paper and of course you mention the refrences . Is it safe, legal and OK to use rewrite websites for writing a review article and wont be a problem in future?
Thanks a lot

Most recent answer

17th Aug, 2022
Nidhal Kamel Taha El-Omari
The World Islamic Science and Education University (WISE)
Dear Prof. Saeed Kianfar & all the honorable researchers,
Plagiarism is a common problem facing almost all professors. This respected portal (i.e. RG) defines plagiarism as:
The term “plagiarism” has different meanings, but it usually includes copying somebody else’s work without permission.
On the other side, self-plagiarism is when the author republishes portions of his/her own previously written research work while authoring a new work.
I may be somewhat old-fashioned, but please have a look at the following golden principles on how to avoid plagiarism in academic writing, especially Self-Plagiarism:
  1. Never use the "Copy-Paste" trend: Use your own words instead of copying and pasting the text verbatim from others (i.e. reference papers). On the other hand, I don't trust using the rewrite-websites to rephrase the text of other research articles. I only trust my own rephrasing. Needless to say that if you are using your own words, then there is no chance of plagiarism accusing. Try to paraphrase your content as much as you could.
  2. Never repeat yourself: There are many re-published articles that are slightly or even considerably modified, and still not changed!
  3. If you have co-authors, just trust your words!
  4. If you use your own words, there should be no plagiarism issue. In turn, there is no need for the tools of plagiarism checking. Since there is no guarantee that the original content of your manuscript might not be copied and sold to others before it is published by you, I discourage using any free-software checkers for plagiarism; some of them are betrayers. Despite that offline ones are rare and if you are insisting to use anti-plagiarism software, offline checker programs are safer than online ones. On the other side and in case you are again insisting to use anti-plagiarism check, the process should be carried out for the entire research work, literature reviews, for instance, are not an exception.
  5. In some cases, you can paraphrase the sentences (اعادة صياغة الجملة) in the original document. But don't forget to cite the reference.
  6. You must always insist on honesty. Furthermore, you have to always remember that there should be a new added value.
  7. You must always insist on doing real research, not "Wikipedia" research.
  8. Do not put any of your research work anywhere until it is published and tagged with your name. Please wait until the paper is accepted and then published in that journal. Then, upload that research item on any platform you wish.
  9. In my opinion, most of the free-software-checkers for plagiarism don't work effectively. Unfortunately, you have to pay for the sake of getting good results.
  10. Despite that offline ones are rare and if you are insisting to use anti-plagiarism software, offline checker programs are safer than online ones.
  11. Try to develop your own style for the text writing.
  12. You should be should beware of storing your document in any portal that is used as free software checker for any language.
  13. Try to read as much scientific literature as possible, especially in your own research field area.
  14. Don't forget to cite your Sources: Identify what is needed and what is not needed to be cited. If you refer to any material, including images and data, you should be clear and define the source. Because images are treated as data in the case of citation, you should refer to any taken image and cite it in the references whether it has been copied from the social media image or a research article. By the way, please do not forget that "A picture is worth a thousand words"!
  15. A reminder for all respected researchers: In order to maintain research integrity, plagiarism (الاستلال) has to be given up. However, many people do not know whether they are committing plagiarism intentionally or unintentionally. How we can be more concerned about this issue?
Now, I think that the above-mentioned rules are helping in setting boundaries to avoid plagiarism in general, and self-plagiarism in special.
Finally, believe me, or not: If you make one plagiarizing, you may solve one problem and fall into many others where some of which may be described as a knockout. Again and again, please always remember that if there were accusations of plagiarism, it is not well for any researcher's reputation, in any meaning.
23 Recommendations

Popular replies (1)

17th Aug, 2022
Nidhal Kamel Taha El-Omari
The World Islamic Science and Education University (WISE)
Dear Prof. Saeed Kianfar & all the honorable researchers,
Plagiarism is a common problem facing almost all professors. This respected portal (i.e. RG) defines plagiarism as:
The term “plagiarism” has different meanings, but it usually includes copying somebody else’s work without permission.
On the other side, self-plagiarism is when the author republishes portions of his/her own previously written research work while authoring a new work.
I may be somewhat old-fashioned, but please have a look at the following golden principles on how to avoid plagiarism in academic writing, especially Self-Plagiarism:
  1. Never use the "Copy-Paste" trend: Use your own words instead of copying and pasting the text verbatim from others (i.e. reference papers). On the other hand, I don't trust using the rewrite-websites to rephrase the text of other research articles. I only trust my own rephrasing. Needless to say that if you are using your own words, then there is no chance of plagiarism accusing. Try to paraphrase your content as much as you could.
  2. Never repeat yourself: There are many re-published articles that are slightly or even considerably modified, and still not changed!
  3. If you have co-authors, just trust your words!
  4. If you use your own words, there should be no plagiarism issue. In turn, there is no need for the tools of plagiarism checking. Since there is no guarantee that the original content of your manuscript might not be copied and sold to others before it is published by you, I discourage using any free-software checkers for plagiarism; some of them are betrayers. Despite that offline ones are rare and if you are insisting to use anti-plagiarism software, offline checker programs are safer than online ones. On the other side and in case you are again insisting to use anti-plagiarism check, the process should be carried out for the entire research work, literature reviews, for instance, are not an exception.
  5. In some cases, you can paraphrase the sentences (اعادة صياغة الجملة) in the original document. But don't forget to cite the reference.
  6. You must always insist on honesty. Furthermore, you have to always remember that there should be a new added value.
  7. You must always insist on doing real research, not "Wikipedia" research.
  8. Do not put any of your research work anywhere until it is published and tagged with your name. Please wait until the paper is accepted and then published in that journal. Then, upload that research item on any platform you wish.
  9. In my opinion, most of the free-software-checkers for plagiarism don't work effectively. Unfortunately, you have to pay for the sake of getting good results.
  10. Despite that offline ones are rare and if you are insisting to use anti-plagiarism software, offline checker programs are safer than online ones.
  11. Try to develop your own style for the text writing.
  12. You should be should beware of storing your document in any portal that is used as free software checker for any language.
  13. Try to read as much scientific literature as possible, especially in your own research field area.
  14. Don't forget to cite your Sources: Identify what is needed and what is not needed to be cited. If you refer to any material, including images and data, you should be clear and define the source. Because images are treated as data in the case of citation, you should refer to any taken image and cite it in the references whether it has been copied from the social media image or a research article. By the way, please do not forget that "A picture is worth a thousand words"!
  15. A reminder for all respected researchers: In order to maintain research integrity, plagiarism (الاستلال) has to be given up. However, many people do not know whether they are committing plagiarism intentionally or unintentionally. How we can be more concerned about this issue?
Now, I think that the above-mentioned rules are helping in setting boundaries to avoid plagiarism in general, and self-plagiarism in special.
Finally, believe me, or not: If you make one plagiarizing, you may solve one problem and fall into many others where some of which may be described as a knockout. Again and again, please always remember that if there were accusations of plagiarism, it is not well for any researcher's reputation, in any meaning.
23 Recommendations

All replies (26)

1st Apr, 2022
David Forte
Cleveland State University
Unfortunately, I do not know the answer to that question.
1st Apr, 2022
Saeed Kianfar
University of Tehran
Thanks bro! David Forte
3rd Apr, 2022
Abdul Azeez Maruf Olayemi
Jumeira University
So far you paraphrased it and you refer to the original work. There should be no problem. You must always refer to the original work.
4th Apr, 2022
Roseanne Calleja
University of Portsmouth
you cannot copy and paste from any literature that you are using. you need to paraphrase in your own words and always put a reference to it. that way your tutors will be able to acknowledge that you have read, understood and referred to academic literature in your writing/assignment. Bear in mind also that tutors will pass your writing through Turnitin and will be able to assess if your work is plargarized or not.
1 Recommendation
6th Apr, 2022
Carsten Weerth
FOM Hochschule für Oekonomie & Management gGmbH
I advice to stay away from plagiarism.
Do your own original work. You can do it on yourself and you can write your own background paper. You only have to invest work and time... Best wishes...
8th Apr, 2022
Rodel Capule
Arellano University School of Law, Manila, Philippines
The key is acknowledging the original author. If its not your original statement or work then cite the author, whether quoted or paraphrased.
9th Apr, 2022
Frank Boi
University of Papua New Guinea
Know the referencing styles and make reference to your work. We live in the information age. To make it formal one cannot write without acknowledging sources unless he or she invented new ideas.
15th Apr, 2022
Rohit Bansal
Vaish College of Engineering
Reframe in your own language to avoid plagiarism issue.
15th Apr, 2022
Sweety Jain
Mangalayatan University
Yes , I think you can use that but when you add citation to your article then give the link of the original article . Means if you are using secondary data then don't give it your name, in literature review or in citation provide the original link or information.
16th Apr, 2022
Hayder Ibrahim Mohammed
University Of Garmian
Can anyone recommend the best rewrite websites? Please.
1 Recommendation
18th Apr, 2022
Alexander Masías Benavides Román
University Cesar Vallejo
En algún momento también me hice esa pregunta. Luego reflexioné y entendí que la labor del investigador es producir nuevos conocimientos y es válido utilizar fuentes de otros investigadores, siempre citando.. Lo importante es que estás tú éstas creando...
23rd Apr, 2022
Temiloluwa Omidiji
Redeemer's University
I think you can just ensure you reference the author and paraphrase your sentence to keep it away from plagiarism.
26th Apr, 2022
Hassan Higazi
Huazhong University of Science and Technology
Don't forget plagiarism it's not legal
27th Apr, 2022
Shirwan Mahmood
University of Sulaimani
In the event that the review articles are used with reference to the original reference, that is, a reference to the original article and without hiding it, you are absolved of any civil or criminal liability, because you refer to the original reference from which you transferred your information and did not hide it. Regards.
28th Apr, 2022
Nurharsya Hanafie
Universitas Negeri Makassar
3rd May, 2022
Yogesh Kumar
National Law University, Delhi
Yes, this can be done but on a crucial condition that the original author is duly acknowledged. It is all about the Intellectual and Property Rights which are to be followed. Just make sure that you add footnotes and citations properly. You can use various types of citation styles like OSCOLA, Bluebook, MLA, etc depending on the field of writing. Also if a resource is available online then you should add its URL and DOI as well.
3rd May, 2022
Nurharsya Hanafie
Universitas Negeri Makassar
Ok and thank you for your statement and atention for me please.... 🙏🙏
3rd May, 2022
Nurharsya Hanafie
Universitas Negeri Makassar
thank you very much for the advice and let this be a lesson for all of us
4th May, 2022
Rohit Bansal
Vaish College of Engineering
You can use rewrite software paid version to safeguard data. Moreover, after using the software make sure that meaning of content should not be changed.
2 Recommendations
4th May, 2022
Nurharsya Hanafie
Universitas Negeri Makassar
6th May, 2022
James David
Arizona State University
If you do use rewrite software, when you read through it, does it sound like something that would come from your mouth, could it be something that you put together. Change what you can to make it more your works vs the AI. Also I recommend checking for plagiarism. Grammarly has an excellent checker.
13th May, 2022
Emmanuel Abegunrin
The University of Law
Of course, it is proper. That how knowledge is enlarged. The important is you are bringing in new perspective, point-of-view, you are not just repeating what the author had said but offering a critical assessment of it. You can bring in other authors that share or even disagree with your view on the subject that is when the excitement really start as you argue for and against. Always acknowledge authors you may use their knowledge EVEN when you paraphrase them. All the best. Excellent writing!
14th May, 2022
Haidar Dziyaudin
Universiti Teknologi MARA
To use a published article in our discussion is not wrong if we analyze, quote and cite
20th May, 2022
Gasu Gideon Nyuimbe
Redeemer's University
Read the articles and sure you rewrite in your own words and ensure you reference your sources, then there won't be a problem
20th May, 2022
Alexander Masías Benavides Román
University Cesar Vallejo
Si reescribes citando la fuente no hay problema, pero te recomiendo que luego de la cita hagas tu aporte reflexivo de esta manera estás contribuyendo a la investigación.
17th Aug, 2022
Nidhal Kamel Taha El-Omari
The World Islamic Science and Education University (WISE)
Dear Prof. Saeed Kianfar & all the honorable researchers,
Plagiarism is a common problem facing almost all professors. This respected portal (i.e. RG) defines plagiarism as:
The term “plagiarism” has different meanings, but it usually includes copying somebody else’s work without permission.
On the other side, self-plagiarism is when the author republishes portions of his/her own previously written research work while authoring a new work.
I may be somewhat old-fashioned, but please have a look at the following golden principles on how to avoid plagiarism in academic writing, especially Self-Plagiarism:
  1. Never use the "Copy-Paste" trend: Use your own words instead of copying and pasting the text verbatim from others (i.e. reference papers). On the other hand, I don't trust using the rewrite-websites to rephrase the text of other research articles. I only trust my own rephrasing. Needless to say that if you are using your own words, then there is no chance of plagiarism accusing. Try to paraphrase your content as much as you could.
  2. Never repeat yourself: There are many re-published articles that are slightly or even considerably modified, and still not changed!
  3. If you have co-authors, just trust your words!
  4. If you use your own words, there should be no plagiarism issue. In turn, there is no need for the tools of plagiarism checking. Since there is no guarantee that the original content of your manuscript might not be copied and sold to others before it is published by you, I discourage using any free-software checkers for plagiarism; some of them are betrayers. Despite that offline ones are rare and if you are insisting to use anti-plagiarism software, offline checker programs are safer than online ones. On the other side and in case you are again insisting to use anti-plagiarism check, the process should be carried out for the entire research work, literature reviews, for instance, are not an exception.
  5. In some cases, you can paraphrase the sentences (اعادة صياغة الجملة) in the original document. But don't forget to cite the reference.
  6. You must always insist on honesty. Furthermore, you have to always remember that there should be a new added value.
  7. You must always insist on doing real research, not "Wikipedia" research.
  8. Do not put any of your research work anywhere until it is published and tagged with your name. Please wait until the paper is accepted and then published in that journal. Then, upload that research item on any platform you wish.
  9. In my opinion, most of the free-software-checkers for plagiarism don't work effectively. Unfortunately, you have to pay for the sake of getting good results.
  10. Despite that offline ones are rare and if you are insisting to use anti-plagiarism software, offline checker programs are safer than online ones.
  11. Try to develop your own style for the text writing.
  12. You should be should beware of storing your document in any portal that is used as free software checker for any language.
  13. Try to read as much scientific literature as possible, especially in your own research field area.
  14. Don't forget to cite your Sources: Identify what is needed and what is not needed to be cited. If you refer to any material, including images and data, you should be clear and define the source. Because images are treated as data in the case of citation, you should refer to any taken image and cite it in the references whether it has been copied from the social media image or a research article. By the way, please do not forget that "A picture is worth a thousand words"!
  15. A reminder for all respected researchers: In order to maintain research integrity, plagiarism (الاستلال) has to be given up. However, many people do not know whether they are committing plagiarism intentionally or unintentionally. How we can be more concerned about this issue?
Now, I think that the above-mentioned rules are helping in setting boundaries to avoid plagiarism in general, and self-plagiarism in special.
Finally, believe me, or not: If you make one plagiarizing, you may solve one problem and fall into many others where some of which may be described as a knockout. Again and again, please always remember that if there were accusations of plagiarism, it is not well for any researcher's reputation, in any meaning.
23 Recommendations

Similar questions and discussions

What is the meaning of theory? ;) - law & legal analysis
Discussion
16 replies
  • Anna KawalekAnna Kawalek
The age old question about theory - the I have put forward a proposition below (which I dont neccessarily agree with) - hope it generates a lively discussion and I am interested to hear from you on this facinating topic ;)
Dr Anna Kawalek
When we talk about theory in academia, any scholarly body has two main (interconnected) theoretical strands. To understand the core academic positions of any legal (or non-legal) school is to consider both aspects. The first is methodology (comprising primarily of ontological and epistemological assumptions about the law, latterly engaging relevant methods of discovering the law). This is general research philosophy applied more precisely to the subject of law (we might discuss the same paradigms in different fields, for instance, maths, physics, or sociology). This branch considers the mechanics behind making knowledge claims pertaining to whatlaw is (ontology), how we can know law (epistemology), and how these theoretical understandings create channels into relevant methods to construct knowledge. For further information, Stobbs provides an accessible overview of the academic terminology ontology, epistemology, methodology, and methods.[1]His articulation is particularly useful because it demonstrates the link between these key pillars of knowledge acquisition (ontology, epistemology, methods), each layer creating a building block for the next, and together creating rigorous methodology.[2]
The second strand concerns substantive, prescriptive, or content-drive claims about the law or what the law ought to do.[3] The focus is subject matter, content, and causal links that discusses the law, practice, and the courts. Generating substantive knowledge claims rest on a (implicitly or explicitly acknowledged) series of complementary methodological assumptions from the first strand. This makes both strands interconnected. For example, commitment to a subjectivist ontology and sociological epistemology would project a substantive theory of psycho-social variety; it is unlikely (and potentially impossible) for this type of methodology to generate a substantive claim of a natural science genre. In the alternative, an objectivist ontology and empiricist epistemology may generate substantive theory of biomedical variety. This means that every juncture of a methodological process opens up a prism of potential substantive claims, whilst closing off others. Usually, when comparing any two schools, the bigger the adjustment to methodological assumptions (what reality is and how we know it), the greater the difference in substantive claim (seeking to explain and discuss these realities). Taken together, if a methodological underpinning offers a (limited) spectrum of substantive claims, this means that literature ascribing to a similar series of methodological assumptions are likely to provoke similar genres of substantive theory. Alternatively, literature ascribing to different methodologies but examining the same phenomenon will project opposing substantive theories about that given phenomenon because they make very different theoretical commitments about the world.
In law, this point is exemplified by legal realism and formalism, two schools that are typically understood as scholarly opponents. Their ontological and epistemological beliefs mean that the realists and the formalists each respectively construct knowledge of the law and legal processes in a very different way to one-another, mobilising a very different sets of methodological benchmarks. However, at the same time, they examine similar substantive content – namely, the courts, advocacy, and juristic methods,[4] and how political standards influence adjudication.[5] The formalist position takes a normatively-infused political angle; it considers judicial decisions and how judges do and ought to decide cases, seeking to persuade practitioners to justify preferences to objective standards.[6] However, the realists reject ought questions and look at social facts and effects as they manifest in reality.[7] At risk of venturing too far into the terrains of their respective substantive claims, the key point is that they examine similar phenomena using very different methodologies. As a result, despite examining the same “thing”, they derive substantive conclusions on opposite ends of the spectrum. This serves to highlight the significance of methodological assumptions for generating substantive claims.
Are there in fact two stands when we generate theory? Discuss.
[1] Nigel Stobbs, ‘therapeutic jurisprudence as theoretical and applied research’ (chapter 3) in Stobbs, et al. [n 14] [48].
[2] Ibid.
[4] Karl N Llewellyn, ‘The Normative, the Legal, and the Law-Jobs: The Problem of Juristic Method.’ The Yale Law Journal, vol. 49, no. 8, 1940, pp. 1355–400. JSTOR, https://doi.org/10.2307/792545. Accessed 29 Jun. 2022.
[5] Jeremy Telman, ‘International legal positivism and legal realism’, in Jörg Kammerhofer & Jean D'Aspremont (Eds.) International Legal Positivism in a Post-Modern World (pp. 241-263) (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2014). doi:10.1017/CBO9781139094245.012
[6] Ibid; Michael Freeman, and Dennis Lloyd of Hampstead. 2001. Lloyd's introduction to jurisprudence (chapter 9). (London: Sweet & Maxwell, 2001).
[7] Oliver Jütersonke, ‘Realist Approaches to International Law’ in Anne Orford and Florian Hoffmann The Oxford Handbook of the Theory of International Law (Oxford, Oxford University Press, 2016) DOI: 10.1093/law/9780198701958.003.0017

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