Question
Asked 29th Sep, 2022
  • Independent QLC researcher

Under dwarf green markets are consumers currently being scammed?

Have you bought groceries or food lately? Have you noticed that the cost of items that form part of the production cost of the product or service you are buying, like plastic bags or food containers that once were free pollution, are now being charge extra to consumers when buying passing to them the apparent environmental responsibility of dealing with them, but the extra money now you are required to pay for the same plastic bags/containers goes directly to the company profits, not to any private nor government nor even to the same company recycling program as perhaps there is none. And governments seem to be okay with this new practice which is now spreading from major corporations to small businesses leaving consumers with no protection.
In a sense, dwarf green markets provide a cover for companies to pass their cost of production plus the “green grab” to consumers usually without having to disclose in advertising what they are doing so, a kind of deceiving as if those items cost more to companies now increasing their production costs that way, then they should increase the prices of their products or services instead, giving that way the option to consumers to buy at a higher price or not.
So consumers pay more, but their extra pay has not clear environmental benefits from consuming at a higher price, which raises the question, under dwarf green markets are consumers currently being scammed by the business community?
What do you think? Please detail your own view.

Most recent answer

10th Oct, 2022
Lucio Muñoz
Independent QLC researcher
Dear Kaukab, thank you for writing.
Yes, greenwashing is a kind of mainstream these days, but as the global warming issue/co2 emission issue continues to go worse and worse than what it was in 2012 , then it may backfire and send dwarf green capitalism very soon into crisis, and opening the door to even for green marxism movements...
Have a nice day!

Popular answers (1)

7th Oct, 2022
Dariusz Prokopowicz
Cardinal Stefan Wyszynski University in Warsaw
Dear Lucio,
Yes, under dwarfing green markets, consumers are now often misled and/or deceived. For example, food sold in supermarkets as being made from the raw materials of crops grown in fields under a sustainable, pro-environmental organic farming formula and unfortunately this is not always true. This is due to the low level of public awareness of farming according to the formula of sustainable, pro-environmental organic farming and to imperfect quality control systems and ecological issues. Besides, why is it that the costs of using plastic in packaging are still being passed on to consumers and not fully borne by producers. The costs of using plastics in packaging are not only production costs, but also costs resulting from environmental pollution by microplastic particles, costs for the treatment of diseases resulting from environmental pollution, costs related to waste sorting and recycling. Another issue is the increasing practice of companies, businesses, banks and other economic operators to portray themselves in advertising campaigns as economic operators who operate in accordance with business ethics, pro-environmental and pro-climate corporate responsibility, pursue sustainable development goals, applying the principles of the green closed-circuit economy, when this is often not entirely true. In this way, consumers operating in dwarfed pseudo-green markets are misled. Consumers buy products and services on the assumption that they are thus part of a growing sustainable, green, emission-free, pro-environmental closed-loop economy. They purchase products and services offered by economic operators who advertise themselves as companies, firms, banks, etc. that have sustainability, green economy, climate change, etc. as part of their mission. However, the data describing the overall activities of these economic operators show that these issues of sustainability, green economy, pro-climate transition often represent only a small part of their activities and not the whole. Consumers do not have the time or opportunity to verify this. It is therefore necessary to strengthen the control systems carried out by the state's public institutions. Another issue is the pro-climate transformation of the energy sector. Due to the current energy crisis, instead of accelerating the development of renewable and emission-free energy sources, it is the state that is taking a step backwards and developing subsidy systems for rising fossil fuel prices, thus again supporting the development of dirty, emission-intensive energy based on burning fossil fuels. In addition, over the last few years there has been an anti-climate and anti-environmental policy of deliberately slowing down, restricting or blocking the development of renewable and emission-free energy sources. This is the case, for example, in the country where I operate. In view of the above, unfortunately, green markets are still imperfect, overrated and lacking systemic state control.
Warm regards,
Dariusz Prokopowicz
5 Recommendations

All Answers (9)

29th Sep, 2022
Sabilar Rosyad
yes
29th Sep, 2022
Lucio Muñoz
Independent QLC researcher
Sabilar, would you like to expand your answer? If not, that is fine,
Lucio
1 Recommendation
30th Sep, 2022
Paul Christopher Thomas
KREATiS
In the example you provide on bags, there is no scam and there is no obligation to buy a bag. The idea (at least the announced idea) is to push consumers to bring their own bags, that way you don't have to pay for a new one each time you go shopping. I'm fine with a "punishment" each time I forget to bring a bag when I go to a supermarket. That's my fault then, and I remeber more and more often to take a bag with me nowadays thereby reducing my contribution to environmental pollution. The money might go to the supermarket if I forget. So be it! Who cares who's pocket it goes into if it is reducing consumerism rather than increasing it?
1st Oct, 2022
Lucio Muñoz
Independent QLC researcher
Paul, good day. The bags I am talking about are the same plastic bags being given before "going environmentally friendly" free with your groceries, and now they are selling the same plastic bags to consumers who have no bags,,,, The same with the containers in take out restaurant,,,, Where is the environmental benefit for you paying now for the plastic bags in this situation?.....
If the cost of the plastic bag is included in the price of my groceries or food in restaurant when I buy; and that money covering the cost of the plastic bag/container goes to recycle that bag/container by company or private recycler or the government, I would not mind paying for the plastic bag/container each time I buy as I would be paying in advance for recycling the plastic bag/container I bought....the circular economy, remember?
Your thought "The money might go to the supermarket if I forget. So be it! Who cares who's pocket it goes into if it is reducing consumerism rather than increasing it?" is the pillar where the non-circular economy operates.....You think you are reducing consumerism based pollution with your choices, but your money to cover the cost of pollution you are generating and paying for does not go to programs collecting/recycling that pollution you think you are responsible for. Under these conditions companies will try to pass to consumers what ever cost of production they can without any connection to environmental goals, internal or external...
That is why I ask the question Paul, to bring attention to this situation that may be happening in different places in the world right now...
Respectfully yours;
7th Oct, 2022
Dariusz Prokopowicz
Cardinal Stefan Wyszynski University in Warsaw
Dear Lucio,
Yes, under dwarfing green markets, consumers are now often misled and/or deceived. For example, food sold in supermarkets as being made from the raw materials of crops grown in fields under a sustainable, pro-environmental organic farming formula and unfortunately this is not always true. This is due to the low level of public awareness of farming according to the formula of sustainable, pro-environmental organic farming and to imperfect quality control systems and ecological issues. Besides, why is it that the costs of using plastic in packaging are still being passed on to consumers and not fully borne by producers. The costs of using plastics in packaging are not only production costs, but also costs resulting from environmental pollution by microplastic particles, costs for the treatment of diseases resulting from environmental pollution, costs related to waste sorting and recycling. Another issue is the increasing practice of companies, businesses, banks and other economic operators to portray themselves in advertising campaigns as economic operators who operate in accordance with business ethics, pro-environmental and pro-climate corporate responsibility, pursue sustainable development goals, applying the principles of the green closed-circuit economy, when this is often not entirely true. In this way, consumers operating in dwarfed pseudo-green markets are misled. Consumers buy products and services on the assumption that they are thus part of a growing sustainable, green, emission-free, pro-environmental closed-loop economy. They purchase products and services offered by economic operators who advertise themselves as companies, firms, banks, etc. that have sustainability, green economy, climate change, etc. as part of their mission. However, the data describing the overall activities of these economic operators show that these issues of sustainability, green economy, pro-climate transition often represent only a small part of their activities and not the whole. Consumers do not have the time or opportunity to verify this. It is therefore necessary to strengthen the control systems carried out by the state's public institutions. Another issue is the pro-climate transformation of the energy sector. Due to the current energy crisis, instead of accelerating the development of renewable and emission-free energy sources, it is the state that is taking a step backwards and developing subsidy systems for rising fossil fuel prices, thus again supporting the development of dirty, emission-intensive energy based on burning fossil fuels. In addition, over the last few years there has been an anti-climate and anti-environmental policy of deliberately slowing down, restricting or blocking the development of renewable and emission-free energy sources. This is the case, for example, in the country where I operate. In view of the above, unfortunately, green markets are still imperfect, overrated and lacking systemic state control.
Warm regards,
Dariusz Prokopowicz
5 Recommendations
7th Oct, 2022
Lucio Muñoz
Independent QLC researcher
You are right Dariusz!
All those are consequences of green market paradigm shift avoidance, responsibility for success or failure has been past to the government as long as business can make money without taking full environmental responsibility they are happy to be under environmental pollution management while the issue they are suppose to be solving get worse in front of our eyes. No incentives for companies to close the renewable energy technology gap, opening the door for green Marxism.claims.
In the article I am about to finish all these issues are linked and addressed to bring academic attention to the sustainability issues associated with the environmental pollution management program and the global warming issue going from worse and worse to out of control...
Have a nice day!
8th Oct, 2022
Lucio Muñoz
Independent QLC researcher
Dear Dariusz, a comment here on your statement in the picture with your comment to me
“Unfortunately, green markets are still imperfect, overrated and lacking systematic state control GREEN ECONOMY”
This statement means you are not clear about what green markets are and what dwarf green markets are as you are mixing up characteristics of both concepts in the same statement, and to me you are just showing deep confusion in that statement.
Keep in mind green markets are based on perfect green market theory and it does not need government intervention unless there is A GREEN MARKET FAILURE.
Dwarf green markets NEED for ever ongoing government intervention because they are not based on perfect green market thinking; they are based on imperfect dwarf green market thinking.
10th Oct, 2022
Kaukab Abid Azhar
Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia
Greenwashing is so common all around the world.
1 Recommendation
10th Oct, 2022
Lucio Muñoz
Independent QLC researcher
Dear Kaukab, thank you for writing.
Yes, greenwashing is a kind of mainstream these days, but as the global warming issue/co2 emission issue continues to go worse and worse than what it was in 2012 , then it may backfire and send dwarf green capitalism very soon into crisis, and opening the door to even for green marxism movements...
Have a nice day!

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