Question
Asked 21st Apr, 2014

Is this disease or insect pests?

These symptoms were found on the Cherry tomatoes. This is the first time I saw these. Can anyone identify them?

Most recent answer

24th Apr, 2014
Wang dong Sheng
Shanghai Academy of Agricultural Sciences
Raghavendra Achari,Stuart Reitz and Bhavin Mehta,Thank you all, and your suggestion give us in the right direction. Probably bacterial diseases, but won't be thrips, because the climate was not suitable.

All Answers (6)

21st Apr, 2014
Aziz Ahmed Ujjan
University of Sindh
Ring spot virus of papaya
22nd Apr, 2014
Wang dong Sheng
Shanghai Academy of Agricultural Sciences
Thank you Mr Aziz, Ahmed! If it is, how to control?
22nd Apr, 2014
Raghavendra Achari
University of Horticultural Sciences
This appears like bacterial fruit spot/canker of tomato (Typical oily surrounding spot). Can be controlled by spraying streptocyclin 500 mg + Copper Oxy Chloride (2-2.5 g) per liter
22nd Apr, 2014
Stuart Reitz
Oregon State University
It could be bacterial. You should see similar symptoms on the foliage not just the fruit. Another possibility is thrips oviposition damage. Western flower thrips (Frankliniella occidentalis) oviposition can cause symptoms like this.
1 Recommendation
24th Apr, 2014
Wang dong Sheng
Shanghai Academy of Agricultural Sciences
Raghavendra Achari,Stuart Reitz and Bhavin Mehta,Thank you all, and your suggestion give us in the right direction. Probably bacterial diseases, but won't be thrips, because the climate was not suitable.

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