Question
Asked 20th Apr, 2020
  • SoluBio Tecnologias Agrícolas

Insects and COVID-19: a possible contaminant?

Dear colegues,
What do you think about this? Can insects or others arthropods transmit the virus (directly or indirectly)?

Most recent answer

15th Sep, 2021
Kiprotich Kiptum
University of Eldoret
Insects have been known to transmit diseases and this requires more investigation for the COVID-19. This risk of transmission is very low but it could be important in isolated environmental conditions, where other means of transmission are not possible.
Read this paper.
1 Recommendation

Popular answers (1)

13th Sep, 2021
Osaretin Christabel Okonji
University of the Western Cape
I don't think insects can transmit the virus directly or indirectly.
11 Recommendations

All Answers (62)

20th Apr, 2020
Suraj Mali
Institute of Chemical Technology, Mumbai
20th Apr, 2020
Bita Jamshidi
Erbil polytechnic university
Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS), Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS), and 2019’s Coronavirus Disease – all of them appeared in the animal world before hitting humanity. These viruses can be transmitted by direct contact with an infected animal or by consuming meat or other products that didn’t pass the appropriate processing.
As for the insects, there is still no proof that they can or cannot carry the virus. This means that insects are potential virus carriers, and we should beware of them until scientists figure out the truth.
8 Recommendations
20th Apr, 2020
Charles D Anderson
University of Louisville
Dear Marcelo,
I have read an older study observing common house fly's as being vectors with TCV.
This was done using a different virus, the turkey corona virus.
I am not sure if the COVID-19 will be the same..?
If infectious virus particales is found in fecal samples, it would lead me to think it could be a viable vector of transmission.
I have not heard of ticks or mosquitoes as being a good vector.
Best Wishes, Be Safe!
4 Recommendations
20th Apr, 2020
Marcelo Tavares de Castro
SoluBio Tecnologias Agrícolas
Many thanks, dear Charles!
1 Recommendation
21st Apr, 2020
Salvatore Vicidomini
Ministero dell'Istruzione, dell'Università e della Ricerca
Dear Dr. Marcelo in the abstract section, there is a first preliminary review on animals & SARS-CoV/2 {dogs, cats, cows, buffalo, pigs, ferrets, pangolins, horses, goats, sheep, pigeons, chickens, }.
Moreover there is also a comment on possible role of humans for the evolution of COVID19 in monkeys in Africa south of Sahara but also for a next wave of COVID19 from monkeys & apes in human population, with a possible African dramatic event HIV/AIDS-like >>> https://www.researchgate.net/post/The_novel_Coronavirus_in_N_Italy_Lombardia_COVID19_2019nCoV_SARSCoV2_shows_a_fatality_rate_compatible_with_SARS-MERS_Why#view=5e9c812cc9c69d6e18442e68
3 Recommendations
21st Apr, 2020
Marcelo Tavares de Castro
SoluBio Tecnologias Agrícolas
Thank you Dr. Salvatore!
22nd Apr, 2020
Munira Nasiruddin
University of Chittagong
Yet there is no evidence that the insects and arthropods can or cannot carry the COVID-19 virus. However, there is a chance of common house fly (Musca domestica) or cockroach (Periplaneta americana), which might as mechanical vectors for the spread of the infection as they move on a contaminated surface and then transmit it to other surfaces from which people might get infected of the virus by coming in touch.
4 Recommendations
22nd Apr, 2020
M. A. Azadi
International Islamic University Chittagong
Mosquito and other blood sucking insects and some flies directly or indirectly can play a role in transmitting the Covid-19. But it needs research for confirmation.
2 Recommendations
22nd Apr, 2020
Geovani Zapata
University of Antioquia
I think that question is very important and many of us have not asked it, the point is that so far the WHO says that insects could not transmit the SARS-Cov-2 virus, but I think it is because of lack of study and lack of time to do work on the subject as all the resources are focused on the health sector, but let's look at this situation if the SARS-Cov-2 virus, can last hours on different surfaces (aluminum, copper, glass, cardboard and fabric) could not remain hours in the chitin of some terrestrial and flying insects, or the proboscis of some hematophagous or saprophagous or even the virus could replicate in the salivary glands or intestine of these, it is necessary to make study on this subject .Translated with www.DeepL.com/Translator (free version)
2 Recommendations
23rd Apr, 2020
Ireneo Latunio Lit
University of the Philippines Los Baños
I just want to add Part 5 of the series of my posts, including a list of references. Note that there have been no studies specifically targeting questions on relationships of insects and SARS-CoV-2 and therefore, there are no available empirical evidences. I am just pointing out possible areas of study and hypotheses, which hopefully will be addressed through collaborative work among experts, including entomologists.
2 Recommendations
24th Apr, 2020
Waqar Majeed
University of Agriculture Faisalabad
Dear Castro, COVID 19 disease is transmitted by insects is not reported yet. Hopefully in future it will remain the same as we assume now. One thing that is very necessary that this pandemic is letting the animal to have a new journey of life.
2 Recommendations
25th Apr, 2020
Hameed Ali
University of Mosul
Why not, but it is more real that the virus my be transmitted in an indirect way, (non-persistent relationship) or not remaining in the body of the insect, because the virus has not established a complex biological relationship with the insects vectors this moment, and because the COVID 19 virus needs to employ the genetic codes for its genes in way the corresponds to the vectors (?) in the future. scientific perception
2 Recommendations
11th May, 2020
Ayesha Azher
University of Lahore
insects may be playing role as a vector
2 Recommendations
12th May, 2020
José Wilson Pereira
Federal University of Pará
Segundo uma live com colegas Entomologistas, as moscas podem ser veiculos mecanicos esporádicos sim! Pousam em tudo e em todos e assim há a possibilidade de transmissao mecanica. Mosquitos não!
2 Recommendations
12th May, 2020
Marcelo Tavares de Castro
SoluBio Tecnologias Agrícolas
Exatamente, prof. José Pereira. Creio que eles atuam como agentes indiretos de transmissão, de forma esporádica. Obrigado pela contribuição!
1 Recommendation
13th May, 2020
Dewanand Makhan
By clearing the forests, you chase the dangerous virus from his home.
13th May, 2020
Geovani Zapata
University of Antioquia
Even if a mosquito picks up a high enough dose of the virus in the blood, there is no evidence that the virus can infect the mosquito or that the mosquito is capable of transmitting it to the next person who bites. on the roll The possible mechanism of transmission is the role of houseflies and cockroaches, but there are no conclusive studies or papers on the subject. the WHO still states that transmission of the virus through mosquitoes is not possible. on the list The possible mechanism of transmission is the role of houseflies and cockroaches
lack of studies on the subject
4 Recommendations
17th May, 2020
Selim Sualp Caglar
Hacettepe University
Although the role of blood-sucking vector organisms in Covid-19 transmissions has not been clarified yet, it seems that vectors that transmit mechanical transmission such as houseflies and cockroaches will have very negative effects on transmission.
2 Recommendations
18th May, 2020
Ireneo Latunio Lit
University of the Philippines Los Baños
I guess I have to repeat or maybe reiterate my answers to the question of the relationship between SARS-CoV-2 and some insect, the last time I posted my reply. Perhaps, the links that I enumerated were hardly noticed, as I noted that some of the subsequent replies were the same as what I have posted in those links.
1. The question of whether insects can spread SARS-CoV-2 or not, is difficult to answer at present. SARS-CoV-2 is new to us. Yet, obviously, there is a need to give answers, albeit tentative, to lessen people’s worries so that they may concentrate on the more salient measures to help ‘flatten the curve.
2. One possible basis for hypotheses or tentative answers could be the set of data provided by Wang et al. (2020, published in JAMA) on positivity rates of clinical samples.
3. Although the viral infection may be systemic, the low positivity rate for blood samples may also suggest, but not automatically, low possibility of transmission through the blood and by inference, low possibility of blood-sucking mosquitoes becoming vectors. However, this is still a hypotheses, and it requires confirmation with molecular evidence.
4. The viruses transmitted by mosquitoes are primarily members of the virus family Flaviviridae except that of chikungunya which belongs to Togaviridae. They have an entirely different protein envelope structure compared to the coronaviruses (family Coronaviridae). So far as known, coronaviruses have not evolved to be transmitted by mosquitoes.
5. There is no evidence connecting house flies and blow flies, fecal matter, sputum, and SARS-CoV-2. There is no evidence because no studies have been conducted. True, the more urgent matter is to follow recommended preventive measures. But yes, once more we are always reminded that “the absence of evidence is not an evidence of absence.” Hopefully, a collaborative work involving an entomologist, an environmental scientist, and a molecular virologist would provide the required evidence.
6. As in the case of filth flies, the high rate of positivity of the coronavirus in fecal samples makes cockroaches potential mechanical spreaders in places where their populations are high, especially in urban poor communities. Moreover, if the initial data on the persistence of coronaviruses in feces of bats (Le Gouil & Manuguerra 2012; Wu et al. 2020) will be extrapolated to those of humans in urban poor communities, then the possibility of cockroaches helping in local spread of the virus may also increase.
8. I do hope that there would be collaborative research efforts involving entomologists, epidemiologists, and molecular biologists so that our tentative answers or hypothesis will have some definitive or conclusive answers.
2 Recommendations
22nd May, 2020
Muhammad Yousuf
King Abdulaziz Medical City (KAMC), King Saud bin Abdulaziz University for Health Sciences (KSAU-HS)
No Human evidence of transmission of COVID-19 by insects (houseflies and mosquitoes)
There have been suggestions of transmission of SARS-CoV-2 by insects like houseflies and cockroaches as mechanical vector as Coronavirus in Turkeys can be transmitted by houseflies (1-2). However, as there is no human transmission reported by houseflies, WHO denies this hypothesis (3).
There have been questions that blood-sucking insects like mosquitoes may be vectors for COVID-19 . However, there is indirect evidence in Humans that blood transfusion from a SARS-CoV-2 positive donor did not cause the transmission of the virus to the recipients (4). This can be taken as evidence that insects like mosquitoes that thrive on sucking blood, will not transmit SARS-CoV-2.
4. Post-donation COVID-19 identification in blood donors
4 Recommendations
22nd May, 2020
Marcelo Tavares de Castro
SoluBio Tecnologias Agrícolas
Many thanks, Dr. Muhammad Yousuf
23rd May, 2020
Munira Nasiruddin
University of Chittagong
There is no proof that insects carry the COVID-19 coronavirus, nor acting as a contaminant. They might be potential careers and we should be aware of them. Notable insects causing diseases are bugs, flies, fleas, cockroaches and mosquitoes. These insects are potentially dangerous. As for mosquitoes, there is no evidence that they transmit SARS-Cov-2 virus that cause COVID 19. Even though the insects are contaminated by the virus, they will not be able to transmit it to human beings.
1 Recommendation
4th Jun, 2020
Diwakar Bastihalli Tukaramrao
Penn State Hershey Medical Center and Penn State College of Medicine
For insects to transmit COVID 19 -- the virus needs to replicate in insects. There is a consensus in published literature about NO possible involvement of insect mediated transmission at this point. Please see WHO release here: https://www.mosquito.org/news/492656/Can-Mosquitoes-Transmit-the-Coronavirus.htm
2 Recommendations
20th Jun, 2020
Arvind Singh
Banaras Hindu University
Have a look at this useful RG link.
7 Recommendations
20th Jun, 2020
Houda Kawas
Damascus University
20th Jun, 2020
Houda Kawas
Damascus University
Insects lack a receptor that can bind SARS-CoV-2,
2 Recommendations
20th Jun, 2020
Mazin H Al-Hawaz
University of Basrah
Till now there is no proof of that
1 Recommendation
20th Jun, 2020
Naser Jawad Kadhum
University Of Kufa
Dear
Mosquitoes and ticks that feed on human blood cannot transmit all viruses
There are as yet no studies indicating the transmission of COVID-19 by insects
This is because viruses cannot reproduce within these insects
But insects can be a direct transporter surface, according to the humble opinion
6 Recommendations
21st Jun, 2020
Waqas Haider
Ocean University of China
No proof, insects carry the Covid19 virus.
1 Recommendation
21st Jun, 2020
Dewanand Makhan
No proof
1 Recommendation
22nd Jun, 2020
Ahmed Hasaballah
Al-Azhar University
For insects, still no evidence that they can or cannot mechanically carry or transmit the virus, means it could be a potential carriers, and we all should be aware of them until this critical issue figured out.
22nd Jun, 2020
Harasit Kumar Paul
Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujib Medical University
Please have a look at the link below:
1 Recommendation
23rd Jun, 2020
Harasit Kumar Paul
Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujib Medical University
There is no evidence of COVID-19 transmission through blood-sucking arthropods like mosquitoes. Though insects such as cockroaches and houseflies, which are major mechanical vectors of pathogens, may be able to transmit COVID-19 by contact with contaminated surfaces and even with the feces of infected individuals, further researches could be carried out to authenticate that.
1 Recommendation
24th Jun, 2020
Samiullah Soomro
University of Sindh
Fortunately, according to experts there is no any evidence of COVID-19 transmission from insects to insects or insects to human yet but you can infect by touching an object because COVID-19 survive on some surface for significant time. According to CDC: SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19 disease, is primarily spread from person to person by coming in contact with an infected individual’s respiratory droplets, for example saliva or mucus.
13th Jul, 2020
Ali Kareem
University of Kerbala
There is no study linked eith COVD 19 yet.
22nd Jul, 2020
Geovani Zapata
University of Antioquia
La OMS dice que es imposible que los mosquitos transmitan la Covid-19, pero no hay no hay estudios previos al respecto, la propuesta seria hacer un estudio o un ensayo podría ser que se alimenten unos mosquitos culícidos (Anopheles, Aedes o Culex) con sangre de pacientes Covid-19 positivos y a las 24/48/62/86 horas, realizar PCR del tracto digestivo de los mosquitos para observar los resultados, además, también deben compararse con muestras de sangre del paciente del cual se alimentaron los mosquitos y de un paciente negativo para Covid-19, como control. De esta manera tendríamos una base para descartar si los mosquitos pueden transmitir o no la Covid-19
1 Recommendation
28th Jul, 2020
Hager Moustafa
Fayoum University
the insects (Mosquitoes,Tick Bugs,Flies,.. ect) there is still no proof that they can or cannot carry the virus. This means that insects are potential virus carriers, and we should beware of them until scientists figure out the
truth.
Thanks
30th Jul, 2020
Hal Levin
Building Ecology Research Group
i want to know the answer because I live in LOMBARDY REGION OF itALY - THEREGIONMOST AFFECTED BY COVID19. THIS IS THE LAKE REGION SO MOSQUITOS ARE PLENTIFUL they coul get the virus feasting on a dead bat..
30th Jul, 2020
Ireneo Latunio Lit
University of the Philippines Los Baños
Again, regarding mosquitoes:
In addition to the data provided by Wang et al. (2020), it has been clarified that the positivity rates on clinical samples are based on tests for detecting the viral nucleic acids (RNA) and not the virus itself.
1 Recommendation
3rd Aug, 2020
Munira Nasiruddin
University of Chittagong
There are no reports about COVID 19s transmission by blood sucking insects such as mosquitoes. However, insects such as houseflies and cockroaches, which are the major mechanical vectors of disease carrier pathogens, may be able to transmit the COVID 19 disease to human beings through contact with contaminated surfaces, as this virus is said to drop down on surfaces, after an infected person's unprotected sneezing or coughing.
1 Recommendation
19th Aug, 2020
Md. Abdur Razzak Choudhury
Sylhet Agricultural University
Although many insects act as vectors to carry the virus (tungro virus) but there no observation yet covid-19 spreads via insect.
1 Recommendation
31st Aug, 2020
Ali Reza Amiri-Jami
Khorasan Razavi Agricultural and Natural Resources Research Center
In my opinion, some insects such as housefly could be a candidate to test as a mechanical vectors of COVID-19 ?!!
1 Recommendation
15th Sep, 2020
Muneer Abbas
Agriculture Research, Plant Protection, Pakistan
Yes insects can transmit these viruses as have many examples in the past
10th Oct, 2020
Md. Abul Kalam Azad
University of Rajshahi
No. There has not been observed any evidence.
31st Oct, 2020
Hayley de Ronde
Institute of Development and Environmental Health
Yes. It is long known houseflies and others can transmit coronaviruses, but we have studied human coronaviruses very little until this event and few have made any attempt to address this matter as it flies in the face of every bit of action we are taking.
16th Dec, 2020
Luis Miguel Constantino
Cenicafe
The Chinese coronavirus is easily transmitted from an infected person to a healthy one. Mosquitoes transmit many kinds of viruses such as yellow fever, dengue, Zika, chikungunya, Nile fever among others, for which it is very possible that the coronavirus can be transmitted by vector insects with contaminated blood.
1 Recommendation
26th Jan, 2021
Saba Malik
University of Agriculture Faisalabad
Yeah! There is no evidence of either insect can transmit the COVID-19 to humans, but as per my study on that topic if it is yes then it is an important study to be considered. And need all of your recommendations regarding this topic, because soon, I am going to do research on that topic. Saddam Hussain Marcelo Tavares de Castro
1 Recommendation
27th Jan, 2021
Geovani Zapata
University of Antioquia
Insects lack a receptor that can bind SARS-CoV-2, thus preventing the virus from replicating in insects, but could being a the risks of mecanic transmission vector of coronaviruses, like SARS-CoV-2.
1 Recommendation
28th Jan, 2021
M. A. Azadi
International Islamic University Chittagong
As COVID-19 is a air borne disease, the possibility of insects spreading COVID-19 is very scarce.
2 Recommendations
29th Jan, 2021
Munira Nasiruddin
University of Chittagong
I think the chance of insects as contaminant or spreading COVID-19 is very negligible and very unfortunate happening.
1 Recommendation
Still not established.
1 Recommendation
12th Aug, 2021
Jinbao Gu
Southern Medical University
Mechanical transmission of SARS-CoV-2 by house flies
  • Velmurugan Balaraman,
  • Barbara S. Drolet,
  • Dana N. Mitzel,
  • William C. Wilson,
  • Jeana Owens,
  • Natasha N. Gaudreault,
  • David A. Meekins,
  • Dashzeveg Bold,
  • Jessie D. Trujillo,
  • Leela E. Noronha,
  • Juergen A. Richt &
  • Dana Nayduch
Parasites & Vectors
2 Recommendations
31st Aug, 2021
Luis Del Carpio-Orantes
Mexican Institute of Social Security
Al menos los mosquitos que son transmisores de dengue y otros arbovirus, no fueron competentes para transmitir sars cov2 , por lo que fue un alivio el saber dichos hallazgos, no hay competencia vectorial
1 Recommendation
13th Sep, 2021
Arvind Singh
Banaras Hindu University
Please also take a look at the following RG link.
9 Recommendations
13th Sep, 2021
Arvind Singh
Banaras Hindu University
13th Sep, 2021
Osaretin Christabel Okonji
University of the Western Cape
I don't think insects can transmit the virus directly or indirectly.
11 Recommendations
15th Sep, 2021
Chinaza Godswill Awuchi
Kampala International University (KIU)
There is no evidence at this time to suggest that the Coronavirus can be spread through mosquito or tick bites. That’s not to say that mosquitoes and ticks aren’t still worth worrying about, as both these insects can still diseases that will put you in the hospital, i.e. the last place you want to be during the summer of COVID-19. In the end, it is best to take the usual precautions you would to prevent mosquito and tick bites, even if you do not have to worry about these species giving you the Coronavirus. https://www.proofpest.com/blog/2020/july/can-animals-insects-transmit-covid-19-/
5 Recommendations
15th Sep, 2021
Kiprotich Kiptum
University of Eldoret
Insects have been known to transmit diseases and this requires more investigation for the COVID-19. This risk of transmission is very low but it could be important in isolated environmental conditions, where other means of transmission are not possible.
Read this paper.
1 Recommendation

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