Question
Asked 12th May, 2016

I want to recommend free statistics software (as an alternative to SPSS) to my students. I got PSPP, PAST, SSP and SOFA. Which software should I add?

I am currently preparing several introductory level statistics courses and want to recommend free (preferably Open Source and cross-platform) SPSS-alternatives to my students for practice at home. So far, my list consists of PSPP, PAST, SOFA and Smith's Statistical Package (SSP) as direct alternatives. I will also recommend SciLab and FreeMat (as MatLab alternatives) and Gnumeric as a good spreadsheet software with many built-in statistical functions. Anything I should add to this list?

Most recent answer

13th Nov, 2021
John Paravantis
University of Piraeus
Statgraphics has recently instituted an online version of its well known statistical package: http://www.statgraphicsstratus.com/. It is not as powerful as its offline commercial offering, but it does have a free mode and does enough for an introductory statistics class. You must register to be able to save (up to 10) data files.

Popular answers (1)

15th May, 2016
Michael D. Nunez
University of Amsterdam
JASP is a free alternative to SPSS that also includes Bayesian methods.
8 Recommendations

All Answers (88)

12th May, 2016
Vojtech Janousek
Czech Geological Survey
Dear Christian,
perhaps you could consider also  R, www.r-project.org...  It is platform independent.
Cheers, Vojtech
7 Recommendations
13th May, 2016
Arseniy L. Sinitsa
Lomonosov Moscow State University
Dear Christian,
yes R is shoul be considered. It's free and has a great variety of packages. Also the results may be easily reproduced by any person.
1 Recommendation
15th May, 2016
Michael D. Nunez
University of Amsterdam
JASP is a free alternative to SPSS that also includes Bayesian methods.
8 Recommendations
16th May, 2016
Svetlozar Bakardjiev
University of Mining and Geology
SPSS is statistical package for social sciences - practically no full equivalent. Nextel is JASP, but not completely ...... Load one more package that covers the social needs ..
2 Recommendations
17th May, 2016
Marek Jozef Druzdzel
University of Pittsburgh
I recommend GeNIe and SMILE, implementing Bayesian networks, data analysis, causal discovery from data.  They are commercial products these days (originally developed at the University of Pittsburgh) but available free of charge for academic research and teaching use.  Here is the link: http://www.bayesfusion.com/.  Follow the Academia link to academic downloads.
1 Recommendation
17th May, 2016
Giuseppe Espa
Università degli Studi di Trento
I recommend the use of R. It is the best and more complete opensource software for statistical analysis. To be used by studets, it is required a bit effort in the beginning. We use it on first year of BA in Economics and Management and, at the end of the course, almost all students are able to use it autonomously.
3 Recommendations
Deleted profile
I would like to recommend the R, too.
1 Recommendation
23rd May, 2016
Oliver Sampson
 KNIME (free and OS) has quite a few statistics functions (you'll need to get the extra statisics packages from the Labs site). It also has a workflow interface that would be familiar to the SPSS users.
1 Recommendation
23rd May, 2016
Roberto Molteni
Ministero delle Politiche Agricole e Forestali
I would like to recommend the R, too. Of course, for your students, I would also like to recommend the process of checking that a software/program meets specifications (e.g. testing with known dataset or known software).
1 Recommendation
25th May, 2016
Faiz Elfaki
International Islamic University Malaysia
I would like to recommend the R software.
1 Recommendation
29th May, 2016
Kajal Gupta
University of Burdwan
With R there is flexibility but sometimes you just want to input values and get a result and not go into the algorithm part
1 Recommendation
2nd Aug, 2016
Christian Reinboth
Hochschule Harz
Since there are so many recommendations for R, I'll definitely recommend my students to check out R as well. Thanks for all the great answers and suggestions. Maybe a combined programming / statistics course utilizing R would be a good addition to our curriculum in the future.
17th Aug, 2016
Roberto Molteni
Ministero delle Politiche Agricole e Forestali
If R is preferred, it is also useful the InfoStat, free version for student, that has the capability to connect to R.
1 Recommendation
6th Feb, 2017
Leon Jacobson
University of the Free State
While on the subject of (free) statistical packages, has anyone tested the packages against each other using the same data set? One area of concern is how the individual packages round off calculations. Is their a default value or does one have to set it? Can anyone comment on this? This brings me to another issue. What is the best statistical method to use for a data set? Can the same data set be made more significant using a different technique, ie, by transforming the variables in a different way or using more or less robust techniques? Perhaps a standard data set (or sets) can be developed from real or made up figures that can be used to test the various methods and their transformations much like a reference material is used to calibrate analytical instrumentation. Just a thought.
2 Recommendations
17th Nov, 2017
Matthew Thong
Monash University (Australia)
I highly recommend JASP (at least for the most basic of SPSS functions). Very intuitive, and creates APA-formatted tables in real time (in the same window), that can then be pasted directly into Word. Reads csv files only
3 Recommendations
24th Jun, 2018
Svetlozar Bakardjiev
University of Mining and Geology
Free statistical page R is a Good candidate - very flexibal and simple interface. My student like working with R
1 Recommendation
29th Oct, 2018
Chinchu C Mullanvathukkal
Cochin University of Science and Technology
Along with PSPP, JASP and SOFA, I would highly recommend Jamovi, another easy-to use software from the developers of JASP. They have launched Jamovi as a (intended) complete replacement for SPSS. Do have a look at the latest current version 0.9.5.6
2 Recommendations
30th Oct, 2018
Christian Reinboth
Hochschule Harz
Thank you very much for the suggestion - jamovi looks really great. I have an addition to this list myself: Epi Info, a public domain statistics suite released by the US Centers for Disease Control (CDC). Available for Windows and Android. Works great, is simple to use and generates very appealing graphics.
2 Recommendations
26th Nov, 2018
Sanja Schreiber
University of Alberta
Except for R, does any other package support Mixed model analysis? I tried Jamovi, and it doesn't have that function. Thank you
-- Just saw that you can add packages. Very cool product!
1 Recommendation
22nd Apr, 2019
Ariel Balter
Oregon Health and Science University
This will sound snooty, but I'd really like to know what people think?
Why use SPSS, SAS, or any of the clones when you can just use R?
Given that R is one of the two main languages being used by data scientists, it is a powerful, full-fledged programming language, comes with an fantastic IDE/workbench, can do anything from simple one-line analysis and one-line plots to whatever your heart desires, has a zillion packages which have been tested and published in peer-reviewed articles, it seems like there is really no need for paid software or software that accomplishes only a subset of what R does with very little to benefit in intuitiveness.
1 Recommendation
24th Apr, 2019
Motilal Ghimire
Tribhuvan University
I want get window supported free statistical software, which can be learned and used by beginners, please find for me.
24th Apr, 2019
Chandramani Aryal
Tribhuvan University
@Motilal Ghimire sir as recommended above JASP would be best choice for beginners. This works software works on basis of R without the need of coding syntax!
1 Recommendation
23rd May, 2019
Ariel Balter
Oregon Health and Science University
In response to Chandramani Aryal , there is no way for a scientist, let alone a student, in today's world to avoid "coding syntax." Avoiding it will just hold you back. Coding is not technical anymore. It's just writing recipes with a few keywords. Most high school children in the US learn at least a little bit of programming. Don't give into the fear. Just learn to write a few lines of code. In the end, it's much faster than remembering which menus to go to or which keystrokes to use.
1 Recommendation
23rd May, 2019
Chandramani Aryal
Tribhuvan University
Ariel Balter Thank you for your concern. I partially agree with you! I prefer R over click and run software and encourage students to do the same. But the case is quite different in Nepal. Majority of students hardly get opportunity to learn programming in high school or later. Thus, they prefer click and run type software such as excel, SPSS including other.
23rd May, 2019
Ariel Balter
Oregon Health and Science University
Chandramani Aryal Understood! What I said about high school is certainly not true everywhere here--we have a wide variety of socioeconomic states, cities, and neighborhoods. But for the most part, our students are lucky to live in a country that has so many resources.
1 Recommendation
24th May, 2019
Chandramani Aryal
Tribhuvan University
Ariel Balter Agree! Saying this I firmly believe that choice of software is of secondary importance. Understanding statistical concept and using it in right instances is what students/researchers should focus to learn. Syntax, code or use of software can be learned at any point of time and switching between software are quite easy while you are conceptually enriched.
2 Recommendations
24th May, 2019
Ariel Balter
Oregon Health and Science University
Chandramani Aryal I also agree. You make an excellent point that the statistics itself is of primary importance. Statistical software is of no use if you cannot apply it correctly and interpret the results correctly!
1 Recommendation
1st Jul, 2019
Gregory E Gilbert
SigmaStats Consulting LLC.
To answer Ariel Balter, one reason to use SPSS and SAS (I am an exclusive R user) is that when submitting analyses as a part of new drug or devices for approval by the FDA, the FDA requires "The computer software used for data management and statistical analysis should be reliable, and documentation of appropriate software testing procedures should be available." (https://www.fda.gov/media/109552/download). Because of the way R is maintained this may be difficult. Of course R does go through testing; however, I am not sure the testing and documentation that is done would meet the rigors required by the FDA (speculation). SAS does. I do not know about SPSS.
1 Recommendation
1st Jul, 2019
Ariel Balter
Oregon Health and Science University
I still can't see any reason (other than Chandramani Aryal 's situation) to use anything but R. It is fast becoming the industry standard in biomedical research. Where I work, some of the older statisticians use SPSS or Stata, but everyone else is using R. Check pubmed for recent publications in your field and see what they are using.
1 Recommendation
1st Jul, 2019
Gregory E Gilbert
SigmaStats Consulting LLC.
Ariel Balter does not address the point some multibillion dollar industries (pharma and CROs come to mind) are not going to be comfortable with a product that does not have a solid industry behind it and been extensively vetted (e.g. SAS). I have had numerous discussions with several different CROs and all use SAS and will not consider using R.
The question posed by Ariel Balter was, "Why use SPSS, SAS, or any of the clones when you can just use R?" I was simply positing one possible reason, I am sure there are others.
1 Recommendation
1st Jul, 2019
Ariel Balter
Oregon Health and Science University
Gregory E Gilbert you will have a VERY hard time convincing me that R lacks the reputation of SPSS and SAS. I would bet $ that "pharma" IS using R. Actually I'm very confident in that because I know people who have come to where I work FROM pharma and they use R. I also see job adverts from pharma asking for R.
As far as the FDA, the majority of the research that will be used to back up result will have been done using R. So I think it would be pretty hard to say that the FDA wouldn't like it.
Finally, I just don't get what you are saying in the first place about "comfortable" and "solid industry behind" (RStudio is a BIG company with commercial accounts), and "extensively vetted." We're not talking about designing rockets or quantum chemistry here.
80% of what people are using R for is doing things like t-tests, anova, linear regression, etc. And then plotting. A highschool senior taking calculus can derive the equations for these things and any computer science sophomore could write computer code to calculate them.
Sorry, but I just don't think your arguments have any weight at all. In 20 years when all the baby boomers using SPSS and SAS are retired, virtually no one will be using them.
3rd Jul, 2019
Gregory E Gilbert
SigmaStats Consulting LLC.
Ariel Balter I greatly appreciate the references. However, I have spoken recently with several large CROs where I have mentioned my experience with R and they have told me, explicitly they are a SAS shop because the FDA "does not accept R". After further research, they are misinformed, what they meant to say is that "We (the CRO), does not want to put the effort into assembling the documentation required by the FDA to accept R."
What I think you still fail to see is that I am an R advocate and use R exclusively. I was pointing out that if I am an established CRO that has already invested in SAS, as a business decision, after investing in resources to assemble the documentation required by the FDA and retraining my programmers it would be years and even decades before I saw any cost savings.
All that being said my clients may still not be comfortable with me doing analyses in R as opposed to SAS.
Therefore, I come to the conclusion that *one* reason some may choose not to switch from SAS, SPSS, and STATA is purely monetary and a business decision. As a student, I think it is important to become proficient in all three major statistical packages, including R because some businesses are exclusively SAS, SPSS or STATA shops. (I recently had one interview that required me to write SAS code as a part of the interview.)
From an individual researcher standpoint, I think R makes the most sense; but then again that was not the question. The question asked was, Why use SPSS, SAS, or any of the clones when you can just use R? I have proposed some practical reasons , whether you agree with them or not, why "...SPSS, SAS, or any clones..." might be used.
3rd Jul, 2019
Ariel Balter
Oregon Health and Science University
Gregory E Gilbert Thank you for your clarifications. However, to make sure that any future readers are properly informed, I want to post some references that specifically address the FDA issue.
Since at least 2012, which in computer years is a lifetime ago, R has been approved for FDA drug trials.
As for your colleagues worrying about preparing documentation, they are ill informed. The documentation has already been prepared.
Here is a document directly from the FDA explaining how they can benefit from using R:
In searching around for these documents I found many anecdotal statements from people in the pharma industry, and the FDA that they are predominantly using R in-house.
So, to finally return to Christian Reinboth 's original question, if I were training future researchers, I would want their time to be spent in the best way possible. I would teach them the software that is predominantly used in clinical research (not to mention public health and many other fields), whether that is commercial or academic, and is most likely to become the standard software in the coming decades.
4th Jul, 2019
Bill Luker Jr
TerraNovum Solutions
I think the apparent dichotomy is mooted by the fact that now, in both SAS and SPSS, you can write R code to your heart's content in the shells (training studios, really) they provide you, and once the code is readable, SAS or SPSS gobbles and executes it, spitting out SAS and SPSS-formatted output. Perhaps this was a work around for the FDA and other government agencies.
1 Recommendation
8th Jul, 2019
Oyvind Hammer
University of Oslo
(Disclaimer, I'm the author of Past)
Ariel, I often use R myself, like most people. It's fine, free, and insanely wide-ranging of course. But why argue for a monopoly? The day when R is alone, there will be no more development of new types of statistical software, and there will be no cross-checking of results in different softwares. It is, in fact, possible to do better than R in the future. For example, the programming language itself is absurdly awful compared with modern languages. And don't pooh-pooh the learning threshold, even for experienced programmers. There are, and will always be, many teaching situations where a simpler user interface saves a lot of time and makes it easier to focus on the concepts. And although I know R quite well and am a decent programmer, I often use Past when it saves me a few seconds of precious research time. In short, I advocate diversity in the ecology of statistical software.
2 Recommendations
8th Jul, 2019
Christian Reinboth
Hochschule Harz
Oyvind Hammer: I don't want to miss this opportunity to personally thank you for PAST. I work a lot with business students who study part-time and who are always very interested in applying what they have learned directly in their working environment. The fact that I don't have to tell these students what a subscription to SPSS costs (privately or for their companies), but that I can provide them with easy-to-use, free statistics software, is of great benefit for my lectures.
8th Jul, 2019
Ariel Balter
Oregon Health and Science University
@Oyvi
8th Jul, 2019
Ariel Balter
Oregon Health and Science University
Oyvind Hammer I COMPLETELY agree with you. In fact, for students heading towards data science in general, Python is an excellent choice. For business oriented students, it is true that a great many tests can be done easily in Excel which is a standard tool that all business students will know.
But given the question of needing to choose a single statistical software to use for an introductory class it would be R all the say. As far as the learning curve, most things that can be done in one line in any other tool can be done so in R as well. These days, many young people have already done a tiny bit of programming. And if they haven't, it's about time they do anyway. It will come up again in their professional lives at some point for certain.
8th Jul, 2019
Oyvind Hammer
University of Oslo
Ariel, I certainly agree with your basic points, and I definitely agree that students must learn to code. But first, I shudder to think that millions of students now learn R as their first language, and get the impression that this is what programming is about. Secondly, why would you want to program even a single line of code to accomplish a simple statistical task? I don't want to have to type in a cryptic command to change font or open a file in Word. That's how it was done in 1973 :-)
1 Recommendation
8th Jul, 2019
Ariel Balter
Oregon Health and Science University
I don't think `lm(Case~Age+Gender, mydata)` or `t.test(dat1, dat2)` is really much harder than pointing and clicking. And probably faster after you have done it a few times. Seeing as how older stats software is heading out, I would teach with excel for point and click or R for one-liners. Anyway, apparently there are many ways to skin a cat.
8th Jul, 2019
Marius K. Somda
University of Ouagadougou
Dear
Thank you Michael D. Nunez for sharing this link https://jasp-stats.org/
Cordialy
15th Jul, 2019
Annette E. Götz
Landesamt für Bergbau, Energie und Geologie
PAST is definitely a good choice.
Cheers,
Annette
21st Jul, 2019
Andrej Sribar
Klinička bolnica Dubrava
I’d also like to point out my favourite (at the moment at least) jamovi - available at www.jamovi.org. It is similar to JASP but more oriented towards frequentist statistics and has nice extensions and a really nifty data editing capabilities (computed variables, transformations and filtering).
I started out with PAST, but since RM-ANOVA is a bit complicated, I switched to jamovi and JASP, and started learning R and pROC, because I needed more advanced ROC analysis which are not achievable with free point and click solutions. Right now I can do most analyses i need in R (thanks to many great tutorials on the internet), but i prefer point and click solutions which save me time.
While I was taking stats classes in graduate school, we used MedCalc, but although it has nice features tailored for clinical research, i think that for the asking price it should have a nicer (i.e. not looking like Windows 95) UI and graphs.
3 Recommendations
21st Jul, 2019
Ariel Balter
Oregon Health and Science University
Andrej Sribar good for you for taking the dive into R. Eventually, you will find it as fast as point and click, and also have routines you have used in the past saved that you can use again in the future.
1 Recommendation
14th Aug, 2019
Robert Nau
Duke University
For a free Excel add-in for linear and logistic regression that is very good for teaching, try RegressIt (https://regressit.com). It is vastly superior to Excel's built-in regression tool. It has an efficient menu interface and produces very high quality output, and it includes many innovative features to guide students in learning and applying good practices of analysis and to make life easy for instructors as well. It includes built-in teaching notes, and it is very good for interactive classroom exercises. It also includes an interface with R that allows users to perform very sophisticated linear and logistic analysis in R (including a number of training and testing options) without writing any code. The analysis is controlled from a menu in Excel with well-designed output produced in both Excel and RStudio. This feature does not require knowledge of R programming, and it gives the user a gentle introduction to the RStudio environment.
1 Recommendation
10th Oct, 2019
Mohammad Javad Nematollahi
Shiraz University
You can also add Mini tab software which can be a good alternative for SPSS.
Greetings!
1 Recommendation
29th Oct, 2019
Tamás Kovács-Öller
University of Pécs
JASP, Jamovi, MATLAB, R. These are all good alternatives.
2 Recommendations
30th Oct, 2019
Michail Dadaliaris
University of Thessaly
Origin pro is also a good alternative!
4 Recommendations
31st Oct, 2019
Balázs Knakker
University of Pécs
For a GUI, I second the recommendation for jamovi (JASP is also great, but I prefer jamovi). I didn't hear about FreeMat, but would rather recommend Octave https://www.gnu.org/software/octave/ for a free and open source MATLAB alterntive, FreeMat seems to be kinda passive since 2013 while Octave is actively developed and maintained. I'd rather avoid MATLAB, it's great but it's closed source and commercial (hope it gets extinct in 10-20 years in science applications...); R is of course a very good choice if it's not problematic to write a script. I wonder if there are R Markdown templates for simple analyses that are usually present in statistical GUIs, that would be really great for teaching.
1 Recommendation
8th Nov, 2019
Kaent Immanuel Uba
Mindanao State University at Naawan
R is a good alternative to all of these statistical softwares.
1 Recommendation
17th Feb, 2020
Orjan Smedby
KTH Royal Institute of Technology
How about Brightstat (https://secure.brightstat.com/index.php)? Web-based, free, and rather similar to SPSS in its interface.
1 Recommendation
22nd Feb, 2020
Hongtu Zhu
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
use R studio.
13th Apr, 2020
Lei A. Wang
Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard
I would like to recommend GraphRobot www.graphrobot.com
It's a free web app that can run statistics and plot data. You can just use it in a browser. No need to install anything.
It's also regularly updated by the Author.
25th Apr, 2020
Kaja BANTHA Navas R
National Institute of Fashion Technology
SPSS Modeller, WEKA are other options
23rd May, 2020
Kaja BANTHA Navas R
National Institute of Fashion Technology
Minitab also best for statistical analysis
28th May, 2020
Eko Hadi
Universitas Diponegoro
I would like to recommend JASP https://jasp-stats.org/
1 Recommendation
10th Jul, 2020
Dimitar Bakalov
Medical University of Sofia
http://invivostat.co.uk It is designed specifically for scientists conducting animal experiments.
1 Recommendation
26th Jul, 2020
Lukas Pawera
World Vegetable Center
Jamovi is a recent alternative. It's based on R, but very user-friendly with point-click analysis. Good for all basic analysis, while extra functions can be added through R packages. https://www.jamovi.org/
1 Recommendation
29th Jul, 2020
Hermes Pérez-Hernández
Universidad Autónoma Agraria Antonio Narro (UAAAN)
I agree with some of you, JASP, and MINITAB are good options.
1 Recommendation
30th Jul, 2020
Leilei Guan
Tongji University
I recommend IBM SPSS and Minitab.
1 Recommendation
11th Aug, 2020
Erwin Blanco San Martin
Universidad Católica de la Santísima Concepción
JASP- JAMOVI
1 Recommendation
6th Oct, 2020
Syed Ariful Haque
Bangamata Sheikh Fojilatunnesa Mujib Science and Technology University
I recommend JASP or R studio.
6th Jan, 2021
Joaquín García-Alandete
University of Valencia
JASP !!!
7th Jan, 2021
Kaja BANTHA Navas R
National Institute of Fashion Technology
PSPP is similar to SPSS
12th Feb, 2021
Wondimu Tadiwos Hailesilassie
Addis Ababa University
I also recommend JASP or R studio.
17th Feb, 2021
Erwin Leonidas Blanco San Martín
Universidad Católica de la Santísima Concepción
Jasp and Jamovi.
1 Recommendation
18th Feb, 2021
Muhammad Irfan Yousaf
Cotton Research Station Bahawalpur
Hello Dear
I would like you to try XLSTAT. It is an amazing software having the capacity to analyze for ANOVA to gene expression analysis. No need for data entry, only excel files are enough.
25th Apr, 2021
Jeankarlo Villanueva Roldan
University of Puerto Rico at Mayagüez
Infostat is really good. You can do a lot of things with the free students version.
1 Recommendation
25th Apr, 2021
Ariel Balter
Oregon Health and Science University
Worth noting that RStudio can import XLSX, TSV, and CSV files.
1 Recommendation
8th May, 2021
Robert A Muenchen
University of Tennessee
BlueSky Statistics is a menu-based front end to R that looks similar to SPSS. It has many more features than most of those mentioned here (except R, which does all its work in the background). I have written a thorough review of it here: http://r4stats.com/articles/software-reviews/bluesky/ and a brief comparison of it to jamovi, JASP, and others here: http://r4stats.com/articles/software-reviews/r-gui-comparison/
3 Recommendations
11th Jun, 2021
John Paravantis
University of Piraeus
Gretl is an awesome free statistical package for econometric analysis (http://gretl.sourceforge.net/). Possibly too advanced for students, but it may be useful if you cover regression of cross sectional and time series data.
2 Recommendations
I want to know too. That will be useful for my future science work, because as all of you know, the theoretical part of one paper is more useful for the audience when there's a data.
I've used SPSS but it's expensive
1 Recommendation
16th Jul, 2021
Christian Reinboth
Hochschule Harz
A small addition from my side (although I have now firmly switched to the RStudio camp): Statcato is a small, tidy and easy-to-use tool for basic statistical calculations. Since it is Java-based, it runs cross-platform on Windows, Mac and Linux and makes a good first impression. Might be worth a try.
2 Recommendations
3rd Sep, 2021
Gregory E Gilbert
SigmaStats Consulting LLC.
A new package just came across my desk, jamovi (https://www.jamovi.org/). It is a front end to R and is available for Mac, Windows, Linux, Chrome OS, with servers and tablet applications planned. It is available free. An excellent discussion by Bob Muechen can be found here: http://r4stats.com/articles/software-reviews/jamovi/. Finally! there is no excuse anymore to be using Excel for statistics. As of this posting 16 articles (https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/?term=jamovi%5Btitle%2Fabstract%5D&sort=date&size=200&filter=lang.english) had made it into PubMed citing jamovi in the title or abstract. Let's hear it for open source computing!
2 Recommendations
24th Sep, 2021
Alexandre Luiz de Oliveira Serpa
Universidade Presbiteriana Mackenzie
jMetrik is a great alternative for psychometrics and IRT procedures. https://itemanalysis.com/jmetrik-download/
1 Recommendation
3rd Oct, 2021
Federico Ferrando-Castagnetto
Universidad de la República de Uruguay
JMetrik worked fine for me, during metric analysis of postgraduate tests or even providing feedback on the results to other university faculties or peers. Great and free solución for any clinician who tries to optimize the educational resources. Thank you, Alex
1 Recommendation
3rd Oct, 2021
Chinchu C Mullanvathukkal
Cochin University of Science and Technology
Recently I came across an Android App named Ministat, which has a tidy interface and does a good job of analysing data from CSV files and providing results.
1 Recommendation
12th Oct, 2021
Brian Powers
Arizona State University
I've developed an online suite of stats applications, statpowers.com
Ease of use for an introductory statistics course is the primary aim.
Recent additions: A population simulator for rapid sampling https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-V9j_tcKSUM
Dataset analysis portal https://statpowers.com/data.html
1 Recommendation
7th Nov, 2021
Chinchu C Mullanvathukkal
Cochin University of Science and Technology
Jamovi is improving continuously and is being covered in workshops and training programmes in social sciences in India. I have already conducted a couple of workshops with Jamovi for college students.
Here is a video that I created for introducing Jamovi to students:
1 Recommendation
13th Nov, 2021
Phillipp Brockmeyer
University Medical Center Göttingen
Try the pvalue.io website, which is a user interface for the R project.
1 Recommendation
13th Nov, 2021
John Paravantis
University of Piraeus
Statgraphics has recently instituted an online version of its well known statistical package: http://www.statgraphicsstratus.com/. It is not as powerful as its offline commercial offering, but it does have a free mode and does enough for an introductory statistics class. You must register to be able to save (up to 10) data files.

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From today, we will offer free advertising space worth $2.5 million on our network to humanitarian organizations working to respond to the crisis. ResearchGate benefits from over 50 million visitors every month, and we hope this initiative can help raise funds and awareness for those organizations that are having direct impact and need support.
We also want to use our platform to highlight the response from the scientific community. Personally, I have found the messages of support from scientists everywhere to be truly heartfelt, and I would like to highlight some of the community initiatives I’ve seen here:
Additionally, I’m posting here some of the organizations responding to the crisis and actively soliciting donations:
To help gather more support for these initiatives, please consider sharing this post further (you don’t need a ResearchGate account to see it), and I will continue to update it with other initiatives as I find them. You can also click “Recommend” below to help others in your ResearchGate network see it. And if you know of any other community initiatives that we can share here please let us know via this form: https://forms.gle/e37EHouWXFLyhYE8A
-Ijad Madisch, CEO & Co-Founder of ResearchGate
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Update 03/07:
This list outlines country-level initiatives from various academic institutions and research organizations, with a focus on programs and sponsorship for Ukrainian researchers:

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