Question
Asked 13th May, 2018

Has anyone used JASP and Jamovi?

Has anyone used both JASP and Jamovi?
I understand that JASP has been developed with a focus on Bayesian statistics and Jamovi is intended as an alternative to SPSS and similar packages.
I am looking for a comparison based on factors such as (non-statistician)user-friendliness, availability of analyses(like posthoc tests) and ease of exporting output.

Most recent answer

23rd Nov, 2022
Stephan Schwarzinger
Joanneum Research Forschungsgesellschaft mbH
I only recently came across JAMOVI and my experience so far is very positive!
As a social and economic scientist I used SPSS a lot during my studies, but worked exclusively with R for a couple of years now.
In my point of view, JAMOVI + R Studio make an extraordinarily productive combination - in my case:
  • Standard social science data preparation (assigning labels, recoding etc.): JAMOVI - very quick and intuitive
  • Data exploration (tables, plots, factors, correlations, clusters): JAMOVI - very quick and intuitive
  • More "technical" data preparation (SQL connections, joins, mathematical operations etc.): R + dplyr (JAMOVI is just not made for this)
  • Collaboration with colleagues using SPSS: JAMOVI (it imports and exports SPSS data very nicely)
  • Interdisciplinary collaboration (e.g. SSH + system science): R (sometimes with code based on the JAMOVI R syntax)
3 Recommendations

Popular answers (1)

10th Feb, 2019
Robert A Muenchen
University of Tennessee
As others have mentioned, what jamovi does, it does well. However, its ability to manage data is quite limited at the moment (see list below). I've written an extensive review of jamovi, which you can read here: http://r4stats.com/articles/software-reviews/jamovi/. You can read my reviews of all the menu-based GUIs for R here: https://r4stats.com/articles/software-reviews/. The R GUI that seems to be in the lead at the moment is BlueSky Statistics: http://r4stats.com/articles/software-reviews/bluesky/. I'm a bit of a stat package addict, so I'd be happy to answer questions about any of those.
Here's the conclusion of my jamovi review:
Conclusion
jamovi is a gem of a package, one that looks so good I asked the developers if they had an artist or user interface designer on the team. They don’t, but clearly, they have put a lot of thought into how to make the software beautiful and easy to use. They have also chosen their options carefully so that each analysis includes what that a researcher would want to see.
Their creation of the jmv package is a bold move, one that promises to greatly simplify the number of separate packages a coder would need to learn, though in so doing they challenge the existing way of programming in R. Just as the tidyverse set of commands is controversial, the jmv package is also likely to ruffle some feathers.
As nice as jamovi is, it also lacks significant features, including: the ability to see and save data management syntax; the ability to handle date/time variables; the ability to perform many more fundamental data management tasks; the ability to save new variables such as predicted values or factor scores; the ability to save models so they can be tested on hold-out samples or new data sets.
25 Recommendations

All Answers (44)

13th May, 2018
Mehmet Sinan Iyisoy
Necmettin Erbakan Üniversitesi
You can try both of them and judge. I favor Jamovi due to its GUI design, practicality and ease of use. JASP has the advantage of extra Bayesian analysis option.
1 Recommendation
14th May, 2018
Chinchu C Mullanvathukkal
Cochin University of Science and Technology
Thanks. But I was trying to get an opinion before downloading either one. Mine is an Intel Atom laptop with limited resources.
Jamovi is my default pick too
16th May, 2018
Michael E Young
Kansas State University
Jamovi is limited but covers all of the basics. I judged it acceptable for teaching purposes. It seems pretty easy to use but doesn’t measure up to my favorite professional packages.
1 Recommendation
22nd Jul, 2018
Bernard S. Gorman
Nassau County Community College
At this point, use both. JASP does Bayesian analyses, network analysis, and SEM while JAMOVI does not do this (yet). On the other hand, JAMOVI does HLM, confirmatory factor analysis, simple mediation and moderation, equivalence testing, sample size estimation, simple main effects, and some extensions to R. Both can read SPSS and CSV files but JAMOVI can also read JASP work spaces.
I've tried both packages on MAC, Windows, and Linux ad they work perfectly. As they're both free, you've got nothing to lose except disk space.
I'm using versions 9.0+ of both and I imagine great things to come.
16 Recommendations
16th Oct, 2018
Ray Garza
Texas A&M International University
Jamovi has been getting better with each update. I have been able to replicate all of my analyses in spss and r into jamovi. Now, it has included functions for computing and transformation of variables. I hope that they include functions for better data manipulation but that can be done easily in r.
2 Recommendations
17th Oct, 2018
Salvatore S. Mangiafico
Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey
I like Jamovi. It seems to have a better sense of how analysis should be done than some of the alternatives. I mean, it integrates descriptive plots, effect sizes, and checking model assumptions in the analysis. It also has a very attractive output. I think this approach will have the best educational value going in to the future.
There of course will be some things that will drive me crazy. Like they advocate using a test for homogeneity when conducting anova. This is simply bad practice.
Also, they list some nonparametric tests under parametric analogues (Mann-Whitney under t-tests). I think this is wrong headed pedagogically.
But, I know.... If I want to be an influence, I should be working with their development team.
2 Recommendations
19th Oct, 2018
Tarandeep Kang
The University of Warwick
It is worthwhile to note that both packages have been greatly developed with new analyses and features since the first answer. Therefore please try out the latest releases of both. JASP also has a bigger development team, who are highly responsive to requests through their GitHub page.
1 Recommendation
29th Oct, 2018
Romulo Soares
Universidade de Fortaleza
I usually work with R. But I've recently jumped onto Jamovi, and it's a wonderful software for very popular analysis like regressions, factor analysis and other stuff.
2 Recommendations
29th Oct, 2018
Chinchu C Mullanvathukkal
Cochin University of Science and Technology
Update: I've downloaded the latest (current) version 0.9.5.6 of Jamovi and would like to gladly report that Yes, as Ray Garza said, Jamovi is improving by each passing day.
I particularly liked the option to create a transform function once and use it afterwards for other variables.
1 Recommendation
14th Jan, 2019
Hugo Jesús Salas Canales
Universidad Científica del Sur
For me, the best is JASP. It's very easy and useful; furthermore, the tables are made acording to APA guidelines.
1 Recommendation
10th Feb, 2019
Robert A Muenchen
University of Tennessee
As others have mentioned, what jamovi does, it does well. However, its ability to manage data is quite limited at the moment (see list below). I've written an extensive review of jamovi, which you can read here: http://r4stats.com/articles/software-reviews/jamovi/. You can read my reviews of all the menu-based GUIs for R here: https://r4stats.com/articles/software-reviews/. The R GUI that seems to be in the lead at the moment is BlueSky Statistics: http://r4stats.com/articles/software-reviews/bluesky/. I'm a bit of a stat package addict, so I'd be happy to answer questions about any of those.
Here's the conclusion of my jamovi review:
Conclusion
jamovi is a gem of a package, one that looks so good I asked the developers if they had an artist or user interface designer on the team. They don’t, but clearly, they have put a lot of thought into how to make the software beautiful and easy to use. They have also chosen their options carefully so that each analysis includes what that a researcher would want to see.
Their creation of the jmv package is a bold move, one that promises to greatly simplify the number of separate packages a coder would need to learn, though in so doing they challenge the existing way of programming in R. Just as the tidyverse set of commands is controversial, the jmv package is also likely to ruffle some feathers.
As nice as jamovi is, it also lacks significant features, including: the ability to see and save data management syntax; the ability to handle date/time variables; the ability to perform many more fundamental data management tasks; the ability to save new variables such as predicted values or factor scores; the ability to save models so they can be tested on hold-out samples or new data sets.
25 Recommendations
2nd Mar, 2019
Hugo Jesús Salas Canales
Universidad Científica del Sur
I prefer to use JASP. It is very simple and has a very intuitive interface and allows for a great diversity of analysis.
1 Recommendation
30th Apr, 2019
Renzo Lanfranco
Karolinska Institutet
Both are extremely intuitive. I think JAMOVI is becoming a wonderful statistics package. In a few seconds, you can run tests that in R would take you half an hour. It has multiple modules you can install to run more specific statistical models. The graphs you can create are very high quality. However, for some reason they can't be properly edited so unfortunately most of the time you need to take them to Illustrator afterwards.
I'd say you can use JAMOVI for everything but for Bayesian stats, in which case you can use JASP. Both are extremely easy to use. In my opinion, though, JAMOVI is superior than JASP and will surpass it in every sense soon enough as it's now incorporating Bayesian tests too. But, again, the only significant limitation I find with JAMOVI and JASP is graph edition. JAMOVI has some very nice graph themes, but it definitely needs more themes and by all means more edition options! You usually end up taking graphs to Illustrator afterwards, which is a pain.
Anyway, I absolutely recommend both, but JAMOVI is superior in my opinion.
2 Recommendations
16th Jul, 2019
D Ravindran
Kristu Jayanti College
great to hear about JAMOVI .Can any one please share JAMOVI instructor manual and learning material to share and teach students with examples and sample files .
Thanks in advance
1 Recommendation
16th Jul, 2019
Mehmet Sinan Iyisoy
Necmettin Erbakan Üniversitesi
Did you have a look at jamovi's web site? Try community resources.
17th Jul, 2019
Chinchu C Mullanvathukkal
Cochin University of Science and Technology
21st Jul, 2019
Yurniwati Yurniwati
Universitas Negeri Jakarta
I found https://www.jamoviguide.com/going-further.html for online tutorial and https://drive.google.com/file/d/1wSttS-IlhRDtlRNUfATYBSERQteg8jh5/view for freebook "Learning Statistics with Jamovi"
Thanks a lot to Jamovi. It is very helpful
1 Recommendation
7th Aug, 2019
Cristian Ramos-Vera
University Cesar Vallejo
With the new update of jamovi you can perform Bayesian analysis and complex moderate mediations.
3 Recommendations
17th Aug, 2019
Barton Poulson
Utah Valley University
I've used both JASP and jamovi, as well as SPSS, R, Python, StatCruch, etc. I use R for anything complicated but for everything else I love jamovi. jamovi and JASP were both developed by many of the same people, which explains their resemblance. Also, both were designed to resemble the menus and output of SPSS, which makes the transition easy.
JASP is designed with a strong emphasis on Bayesian statistics but jamovi is now able to do all of those same procedures by adding one of the free "modules." JASP is built on slightly older technology and Mac users like myself have to install X11 first, which is a slight pain. jamovi is built on HTML5, which means that it doesn't require any extra installations and that an online version is theoretically a simple issue (and the developers have said that's on their to-do list).
At the moment, JASP has a much richer set of sample datasets and allows for markdown commenting and text in output. I imagine jamovi will get those eventually.
While both programs run on R underneath the hood, jamovi has huge advantage in that it makes the code available if you run commands in "syntax mode." Those commands can then be run in regular R if you install the jmv package. jamovi also has a module that allows you to run any R code in the jamovi environment. These both make it a fabulous bridge between the two approaches.
I also believe that jamovi provides more built-in procedures for psychological research, such as psychometrics and confirmatory factor analysis. Also, the data management and recoding options have been greatly enhanced, to the point that they're better than SPSS.
In terms of learning jamovi, there are several resources, but I want to share the set of videos that I created for my own company, datalab.cc. You can see them at datalab.cc (https://datalab.cc/tools/jamovi) or on YouTube (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ej9e8lzaeDE&list=PLkk92zzyru5OAtc_ItUubaSSq6S_TGfRn, a link was shared earlier). The videos are also available on LinkedIn Learning (https://www.linkedin.com/learning/introduction-to-jamovi), although that's a subscription service.
I strongly encourage my students and my colleagues to try jamovi unless and until they know that they need something more sophisticated. It's my go-to tool.
Bart
6 Recommendations
17th Aug, 2019
John T Cathey
Peerwith + Connecting Experts
Nice set of videos. I’ve used R for about 5 years, recently discovered jamovi. Is there any reason to use JASP in addition to jamovi?
1 Recommendation
17th Aug, 2019
Renzo Lanfranco
Karolinska Institutet
John T Cathey good question. I think JASP is still better at Bayesian analysis. It feels it was made for it and that the frequentist analyses included are just add-ons, while Jamovi feels the opposite way to me: it was made with the purpose of simplifying stats for people, and recently they have started adding Bayesian analyses to it. I think if they keep developing at this pace, in a year there won't be any advantage to use JASP if you already use Jamovi. But for now, I think JASP is still a bit better for Bayesian analysis than Jamovi.
1 Recommendation
17th Aug, 2019
Gert H.J. Kruger
University of Johannesburg
I'm using both at this stage but I suspect Jamovi will come out on top due to its ability to have others develop modules to expand functionality. It also seems to be developed at a faster rate with the developers also very active on their forum. JASP lately added a modules function but I'm not sure whether that would be open to outsiders for adding new functions.
JASP includes SEM using lavaan syntax and has recently added a very good mediation analysis function. Jamovi has a GLM Mediation Analysis module (jAMM) which is well-documented and more powerful (e.g. conditional models) than that of JASP, although I suspect one could do much the same with the lavaan syntax option in the latter.
For me, both could still improve their data manipulation functionality, including ease of use. I'm also not too impressed with the way Jamovi generates tables for exporting/copying to Word. It creates lots of (unnecessary) small cells for spacing purposes which become cumbersome when formatting according to a specific reference style or journal requirement. JASP provides much cleaner tables.
1 Recommendation
28th Aug, 2019
Clary J Foote
McMaster University
Jamovi. What particularly do you see emerging?
3rd Sep, 2019
Marc Brysbaert
Ghent University
I've included Jamovi and JASP examples in the new edition of my stats textbook ( https://www.macmillanihe.com/page/detail/Basic-Statistics-for-Psychologists/?K=9781137607461). I recommend adding Jamovi to your course if you want to teach stats with R. Makes it much more digestible for your colleagues in the department, who do not yet know R and fear they will no longer be able to help their students with the analysis of their data. Everyone with knowledge of SPSS can learn Jamovi in one or two hours.
5 Recommendations
20th Sep, 2019
Jong Jee Leong
Universiti Malaysia Sabah (UMS)
Why does researcher prefer to use Jamovi instead of SPSS to analyze the data? How about PLS-SEM? I personally prefer PLS-SEM because of the friendly-user features in the program.
1 Recommendation
12th Feb, 2020
Gollagari Ramakrishna
ICFAI Business School
I am using jamovi for advanced models such as GLM and CFA. These are very good compared to other software but in future they should include other statisics particularly for CFA.
2 Recommendations
26th Feb, 2020
Renzo Lanfranco
Karolinska Institutet
One potential issue I've found with both Jamovi and JASP is related to post hoc pairwise comparisons when finding a significant interaction with RM ANOVAs. They run on the emmeans R package - estimated marginal means. The results are based on the pooled variance of the ANOVA. This adjustment often yields different results than paired-sample t-tests. While the developers have a rationale for this implementation, it's a bit cryptic and quite different from what most researchers do when they find significant interactions. Besides this, both are marvellous, in my opinion. Jamovi better overall and JASP better for Bayesian models, though Jamovi is rapidly catching up on the latter.
4 Recommendations
27th Feb, 2020
Gollagari Ramakrishna
ICFAI Business School
Advanced mediation models can be handled very nicely using Jamovi
2 Recommendations
2nd Mar, 2021
Cynthia A Erickson
Metropolitan State University of Denver
Jamovi is super straightforward. Beginning stats students can learn it iin 10 minutes. It has all basic stats and it is free.
3 Recommendations
1st Apr, 2021
Ingrid Del Valle García Carreño
Universidad Pablo de Olavide
Good morning
By this moment I am learning JASP for social sciences
I prefer JASP that SPPS, it is free
Best regards
Ph.D. Ingrid del Valle García Carreño
1 Recommendation
19th Jul, 2021
Chinchu C Mullanvathukkal
Cochin University of Science and Technology
Version 2.0.0 (current) of Jamovi is now available.
A new 'Variables' tab has been added.
24th Sep, 2021
Yunier Broche-Pérez
I have had the opportunity to use JASP and JAMOVI. At first I found JASP great for all the reasons described above and started using it to perform, for example, CFA. Then, inexplicably, the page was blocked for Cuba and from there the disappointment only grew more and more each day. After that I learned about JAMOVI and it was a breath of fresh air. For researchers who, like me, belong to low-income countries, JAMOVI may become the best alternative available.
2 Recommendations
25th Sep, 2021
Gollagari Ramakrishna
ICFAI Business School
Jamovi has the capabilities of handling Meta Analysis also. JASP can handle SEM using Lavaan syntax.
3 Recommendations
7th Nov, 2021
Chinchu C Mullanvathukkal
Cochin University of Science and Technology
So, here's an update:
I have been using Jamovi for quite some time now. I have started focusing on Jamovi as the software of choice for workshops and training programmes on data analysis in social sciences.
Here is a video that I have prepared to introduce Jamovi to students:
1 Recommendation
7th Nov, 2021
Nasser Elghuzawany
Derna University
All what I use in my researches is SPSS??? does it make sense??
1 Recommendation
20th Nov, 2021
Zarko Bajic
Biometrika Healthcare Research
Nasser Elghuzawany I think that the program is impotent as far as meaning is concerned. Only the researcher and her or his specific analysis plan can have that characteristic.
For sure, if you put a trainee in a Ferrari she or he will be faster than a Schumacher in an old East German Trabant (with all due respect to the legendary Trabant). Therefore, if you give up on SPSS, your research will gain nothing in meaning beyond the measure they already have.
But your work/life may be more nicer, faster, more fun, interesting, simpler, cheaper or more fairerly charged, and you may feel more free and in interaction with the team working on the program you spend so many hours-with every day.
However, SPSS is not a Ferrari. Okay, its definitely not a Trabant either. Again, the Trabant was a good car, uhm, with a bit of a specific positioning.
I sound like I'm selling jamovi and JASP. That’s among the nicest thing: you can’t sell them because they’re free. I use Stata for most of my daily work (payed almost 2000$ and I'm still deeply happy), but I love them both. I used SPSS PC+ for the first time in 1991 and I was in love, and I am still keeping installed newer versions just because of Hayes PROCESS macros. But life is more than the first love. :)
1 Recommendation
21st Nov, 2021
Nasser Elghuzawany
Derna University
thanks a lot Sir
21st Nov, 2021
Salvatore S. Mangiafico
Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey
Nasser Elghuzawany I am a big fan of Jamovi. That being said, there is no way it competes currently in terms of the variety of analyses with SPSS, R, or SAS. Think of things like ordinal regression or mixed effects generalized linear models. ... I assume some day these will be included in Jamovi, or there will modules available. ... I think there is some logic to using the same software that used by your colleagues or commonly used in your field. Even though software like SPSS, R, and SAS all have very different programming languages and quirks, the reality is that once you understand how to do certain statistical analyses, you can always figure out how to do them in future on a different platform. That being said, it's nice using something free like R that you don't need to worry about being able to access it through a university or grant funding.
2 Recommendations
21st Nov, 2021
Nasser Elghuzawany
Derna University
it seems very exciting software ..I should try it some day
1 Recommendation
30th Jan, 2022
Chinchu C Mullanvathukkal
Cochin University of Science and Technology
The 'Community' page is a good resource for learning resources for Jamovi, available in multiple languages.
2 Recommendations
22nd Jun, 2022
Kingsley Chinaza Nwosu
Nnamdi Azikiwe University, Awka
I think Jamovi good. There is great improvement. snowRMM has been added and it is a good stuff for latent profile analysis and latent class analysis. I wanted to run LPA, but hadn't Mplus or any other commercial software but SPSS. It is Jamovi that is giving me a ray of hope now. I appreciate the programmers for their good jobs. They have really helped researchers from developing nations.
4 Recommendations
23rd Nov, 2022
Stephan Schwarzinger
Joanneum Research Forschungsgesellschaft mbH
I only recently came across JAMOVI and my experience so far is very positive!
As a social and economic scientist I used SPSS a lot during my studies, but worked exclusively with R for a couple of years now.
In my point of view, JAMOVI + R Studio make an extraordinarily productive combination - in my case:
  • Standard social science data preparation (assigning labels, recoding etc.): JAMOVI - very quick and intuitive
  • Data exploration (tables, plots, factors, correlations, clusters): JAMOVI - very quick and intuitive
  • More "technical" data preparation (SQL connections, joins, mathematical operations etc.): R + dplyr (JAMOVI is just not made for this)
  • Collaboration with colleagues using SPSS: JAMOVI (it imports and exports SPSS data very nicely)
  • Interdisciplinary collaboration (e.g. SSH + system science): R (sometimes with code based on the JAMOVI R syntax)
3 Recommendations

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