Question
Asked 4th Nov, 2017

Free energy from permanent magnets?

Often the objections raised to claims of getting power from permanent magnets are accompanied by the argument “How one can get an output without an input?”. When it is said so normally we meant to say “see we are not giving it any input”. But isn’t it the same with hydroelectric power? The water had a potential energy by virtue of the gravitational force that pulls it. Likewise magnet is also pulled by another magnet. So if we had a fluid of tiny magnets being pulled by a large magnet, power can be produced from the kinetic energy of mass of magnetic fluid. Then the question that should be asked is: Is there sufficient magnetic energy stored in the system that can be converted into some other useful form?

Most recent answer

9th Nov, 2021
Sofia Penabaz-Wiley
Chiba University
Would it be possible to use the force created by polar opposites going against each other to power a turbine...? What about using this force to move vehicles? Is this not possible...? I have never seen it, but I have also wondered this question and want to know more.
1 Recommendation

Popular Answers (1)

6th Nov, 2017
Joachim Pimiskern
You can dissolve a permanent magnet
in acid, then the energy stored in
it is set free as heat. It is not
very much, as you can guess from the
energy it takes to make steel
magnetic.
Regards,
Joachim
5 Recommendations

All Answers (9)

6th Nov, 2017
Joachim Pimiskern
You can dissolve a permanent magnet
in acid, then the energy stored in
it is set free as heat. It is not
very much, as you can guess from the
energy it takes to make steel
magnetic.
Regards,
Joachim
5 Recommendations
8th Nov, 2017
Alexander J. Babchin
Alberta Research Council (ARC)
Impressive way of thinking !
2 Recommendations
8th Nov, 2017
Joachim Pimiskern
Thanks. But there is a more useful way of getting the energy from a magnet, spin batteries. A magnetic field is applied to charge the device, and the decay of it takes place producing a current. Never heard of it again.
Regards,
Joachim
3 Recommendations
9th Nov, 2017
Jerry Decker
Retired Engineer
Magnets don’t contain free energy. They contain internal energy. It can be removed as the magnetism is lost. With the magnetic field there is an electric field vector circling the magnet, but eddy currents waste the electric potential. So the permanent magnet does no work.
A variety of schemes to suppress eddy currents have been proposed and tested, leading to the conservation laws, and the core properties of transformers.
Generally speaking when energy is removed from a device by some nonrandom selection process, it then contains less energy and stops working or becomes cold, unless the energy is recovered from the surroundings. Schrödinger allowed nonrandom devices of this type governed by the third law of thermodynamics.
3 Recommendations
10th Nov, 2017
Muhammad Amin
Institute of Space Technology
Thanks everyone for your thoughts on the topic.
11th Jan, 2020
Anil Naik
Vedanta Ltd Goa
Free energy from permanent magnet is possible.

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