Question
Asked 13th Dec, 2016

Does anyone have a good piece of research to discuss the links between Working Memory and Prospective Memory?

I'm teaching the links between PM and WM and have a couple of articles but ideally need more to shown links between these two.

Most recent answer

16th Dec, 2016
John Hyland
Dublin Business School
Following on from what Hunter was saying earlier about the Smith & Bayen (2005) paper, the Smith, Persyn, & Butler (2015) paper is also very good. The only issue is that it isn't just directly investigating the link between PM and WM, but also personality structure.

All Answers (5)

13th Dec, 2016
Margaret C Jackson
University of Aberdeen
I'll pass on your query to Katharina Schnitzspahn - she was at the WM meeting talking about prospective and WM. She might have a good reference.
Madge
1 Recommendation
14th Dec, 2016
Laura Jenkins
Loughborough University
Thank you - I have a few articles but just need one or two more.
14th Dec, 2016
John S. Antrobus
CUNY Graduate Center
Neither of these are "memory" in the classic sense, but rather a huge array of frontal and prefrontal recurrent circuits that can temporally bias bottom-up recognition processes.   The early part of a paper I recent wrote for the The Oxford Handbook of Spontaneous Thought: Mind-wandering, Creativity, Dreaming, and Clinical Disorders, suggests how these "memory" process are related to spontaneous thought
2 Recommendations
15th Dec, 2016
Hunter Ball
University of Texas at Arlington
Certainly not exhaustive, but here are a few cites you may want to check out:
Marsh & Hicks (1998); Kidder, Park, Herzog, & Morrel (1997); Kliegel, Martin, McDaniel, & Einstein (2002); Smith & Bayen (2005); Brewer, Knight, Marsh, & Unsworth (2010); Unsworth, Brewer, & Spillers (2012); Ball, Knight, DeWitt, & Brewer (2014); Rose, Rendell, McDaniel, Aberle, & Kliegel (2010); Schnitzpahn, Stahl, Zeintl, Kaller, & Kliegel (2013); Reynolds, West, & Braver (2009)
I'm probably biased, but I think the Brewer et al. (2010) paper is one of the easier to grasp studies that demonstrates that WM is needed for attentionally demanding tasks (i.e., nonfocal PM), but not for more automatic tasks (i.e., focal PM). But I'd say Marsh & Hicks (1998) is probably one of the most classic cites on the topic. I also like the modeling approach taken by Smith & Bayen (2005).
2 Recommendations
16th Dec, 2016
John Hyland
Dublin Business School
Following on from what Hunter was saying earlier about the Smith & Bayen (2005) paper, the Smith, Persyn, & Butler (2015) paper is also very good. The only issue is that it isn't just directly investigating the link between PM and WM, but also personality structure.

Similar questions and discussions

Psychophysics without fixation?
Question
7 answers
  • Joao BarbosaJoao Barbosa
Hi folks,
I'm planing to run an experiment on Amazon Turks and one big limitation is that I can't be sure subjects are really fixating. My question is two-fold: a) how to work around it and b) how important is fixation
Task details (that might be irrelevant for the general question)
My task is a variation of a multi-item working memory that subjects have to report the color feature after a delay. On each trial, a set of colored circles appear on the screen. The stimuli are then removed and after a delay of 3s the subject has to report the color of one cued stimulus. 
Fixation workaround
A way I thought to work around it was to have the fixation cross change color at random times. The subjects have to detect when that happens as fast as they can. Subjects with faster RT will get higher bonus that will multiply the reward for correct trials. The problem  with this solution is that the task is of course more demanding and this will impair their working memory precision. I'm also not convinced this will actually work.
Finally, the second part of the question, would be about how important is fixation. Do you think for this experiment fixation is something I can't relax? Why do you think fixation is so important? I can see that fixation is a way to control the over attention allocation, but in any case subjects might be allocating covertly their attention to one stimulus more than to other. Fixation during delay, for example, shouldn't matter so much, right?
Thank you all in advance

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