Question
Asked 14th Nov, 2016

Does a plant's risk of infection with an arthropod-transmitted pathogen depend on where it is attacked?

More specifically, will a plant virus achieve greater inoculation success if the vector feeds on a growing plant part vs. a senescent part?
I've heard that fast growing parts of a plant may be more susceptible to infection from viruses, but haven't been able to find anything empirical backing this up.

Most recent answer

16th Nov, 2016
Houda Kawas
Damascus University
Dear Paul Chisholm
Usually we Called it age resistance, its not only for transmission by vectors, also affected by interference , signals and pathways, movement protein, plant hormone (http://www.springer.com/us/book/9789401792844)...
Pls. find the attached files
page 287 in: IRRI, 1969 The Virus Diseases of the Rice Plant: Proceedings of a Symposium at the International Rice Research Institute, April, 1967 International Rice Research Institute
Hoping this will be helpful
Regards
Prof. Houda Kawas

All Answers (4)

15th Nov, 2016
Pranab Bhattacharyya
Tea Research Association
Dear Paul Chisholm,
Please find the attached research articles 
15th Nov, 2016
Adrian Fox
Fera
Hi Paul,
Not easy to give a straightforward answer to this question.
When we carry out manual and aphid  inoculations in the lab/glasshouse we always carry these out on very young test plants (4 leaf stage, about 3 weeks post emergence), due to the increased success rate of transmission studies.
In terms of field relevance, there are several complicating factors in giving an overview answer. The first of these are that the response will depend upon the virus species (or even the strain), the plant host species (or even the cultivar) and the particular vector, the prevailing temperature and the pathosystem in question (e.g. sources of virus). An additional emerging factor is the effect of circadian rhythm on infection success.(see links to plantcell and sciencedirect below)
As a general rule young plants are considered more susceptible to  virus infection than mature plants. However, this may (at least in part)  be a function of the relative attractiveness of the plant to attack by the vectors (see link to Cambridge work below...).
Some further thoughts on the subject....
In seed potatoes, we recognise 'mature plant resistance' can affect the rates of translocation of the virus in the plant and this can affect the rate of secondary infections (vertical transmission)  in subsequent crops. however, the rates of these changes vary with cultivar and strain of virus. (See de Bokx, 1972, Viruses of potatoes and seed-potato production, Chapter. 11 ).
We have also bee studying viruses of carrot crops and it looks as though the different viruses arrive in the crops in 'waves' through the growing season, some from wild hosts (weeds) and some from surrounding similar crops. This is possibly driven by both the emergence of reservoir hosts and the migration of aphids as much as the susceptibility of the receiver plant.
this is by no means a complete answer, but happy to discuss further...
16th Nov, 2016
Adrian Fox
Fera
Paul,
I also meant to say that I realise the above comment doesn't directly answer your question, but I am not aware of any research which looks specifically at relative transmission to different parts of the same plant....
Good luck with your research,
Adrian
16th Nov, 2016
Houda Kawas
Damascus University
Dear Paul Chisholm
Usually we Called it age resistance, its not only for transmission by vectors, also affected by interference , signals and pathways, movement protein, plant hormone (http://www.springer.com/us/book/9789401792844)...
Pls. find the attached files
page 287 in: IRRI, 1969 The Virus Diseases of the Rice Plant: Proceedings of a Symposium at the International Rice Research Institute, April, 1967 International Rice Research Institute
Hoping this will be helpful
Regards
Prof. Houda Kawas

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