Lab

Text-Technology Lab (TTLab)

About the lab

The TTLab (Text Technology Lab), headed by Prof. Alexander Mehler, is part of the Department of Computer Science and Mathematics (Fachbereich Informatik und Mathematik) at the Goethe Universität in Frankfurt. It investigates formal, algorithmic models to deepen our understanding of information processing in the humanities. We examine diachronic, time-dependent as well as synchronic aspects of processing linguistic and non-linguistic, multimodal signs. The Lab works across several disciplines to bridge between computer science on the one hand and corpus-based research in the humanities on the other. To this end, we develop information models and algorithms for the analysis of texts, images, and other objects relevant to research in the humanities.

Featured projects (1)

Featured research (7)

Transformer-based models are now predominant in NLP. They outperform approaches based on static models in many respects. This success has in turn prompted research that reveals a number of biases in the language models generated by transformers. In this paper we utilize this research on biases to investigate to what extent transformer-based language models allow for extracting knowledge about object relations (X occurs in Y; X consists of Z; action A involves using X). To this end, we compare contextualized models with their static counterparts. We make this comparison dependent on the application of a number of similarity measures and classifiers. Our results are threefold: Firstly, we show that the models combined with the different similarity measures differ greatly in terms of the amount of knowledge they allow for extracting. Secondly, our results suggest that similarity measures perform much worse than classifier-based approaches. Thirdly, we show that, surprisingly, static models perform almost as well as contextualized models -- in some cases even better.
Parliamentary debates represent a large and partly unexploited treasure trove of publicly accessible texts. In the German-speaking area, there is a certain deficit of uniformly accessible and annotated corpora covering all German-speaking parliaments at the national and federal level. To address this gap, we introduce the German Parliament Corpus (GerParCor). GerParCor is a genre-specific corpus of (predominantly historical) German-language parliamentary protocols from three centuries and four countries, including state and federal level data. In addition, GerParCor contains conversions of scanned protocols and, in particular, of protocols in Fraktur converted via an OCR process based on Tesseract. All protocols were preprocessed by means of the NLP pipeline of spaCy3 and automatically annotated with metadata regarding their session date. GerParCor is made available in the XMI format of the UIMA project. In this way, GerParCor can be used as a large corpus of historical texts in the field of political communication for various tasks in NLP.
Parliamentary debates represent a large and partly unexploited treasure trove of publicly accessible texts. In the German-speaking area, there is a certain deficit of uniformly accessible and annotated corpora covering all German-speaking parliaments at the national and federal level. To address this gap, we introduce the German Parliamentary Corpus (GerParCor). GerParCor is a genre-specific corpus of (predominantly historical) German-language parliamentary protocols from three centuries and four countries, including state and federal level data. In addition, GerParCor contains conversions of scanned protocols and, in particular, of protocols in Fraktur converted via an OCR process based on Tesseract. All protocols were preprocessed by means of the NLP pipeline of spaCy3 and automatically annotated with metadata regarding their session date. GerParCor is made available in the XMI format of the UIMA project. In this way, GerParCor can be used as a large corpus of historical texts in the field of political communication for various tasks in NLP.
Parliamentary debates represent a large and partly unexploited treasure trove of publicly accessible texts. In the German-speaking area, there is a certain deficit of uniformly accessible and annotated corpora covering all German-speaking parliaments at the national and federal level. To address this gap, we introduce the German Parliament Corpus (GerParCor). GerParCor is a genre-specific corpus of (predominantly historical) German-language parliamentary protocols from three centuries and four countries, including state and federal level data. In addition, GerParCor contains conversions of scanned protocols and, in particular, of protocols in Fraktur converted via an OCR process based on Tesseract. All protocols were preprocessed by means of the NLP pipeline of spaCy3 and automatically annotated with metadata regarding their session date. GerParCor is made available in the XMI format of the UIMA project. In this way, GerParCor can be used as a large corpus of historical texts in the field of political communication for various tasks in NLP.
Transformer-based models are now predominant in NLP. They outperform approaches based on static models in many respects. This success has in turn prompted research that reveals a number of biases in the language models generated by transformers. In this paper we utilize this research on biases to investigate to what extent transformer-based language models allow for extracting knowledge about object relations (X occurs in Y; X consists of Z; action A involves using X). To this end, we compare contextualized models with their static counterparts. We make this comparison dependent on the application of a number of similarity measures and classifiers. Our results are threefold: Firstly, we show that the models combined with the different similarity measures differ greatly in terms of the amount of knowledge they allow for extracting. Secondly, our results suggest that similarity measures perform much worse than classifier-based approaches. Thirdly, we show that, surprisingly, static models perform almost as well as contextualized models -- in some cases even better.

Lab head

Alexander Mehler
Department
  • Institut für Informatik

Members (15)

Andy Lücking
  • Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main
Giuseppe Abrami
  • Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main
Wahed Hemati
  • Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main
Tolga Uslu
  • Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main
Daniel Baumartz
  • Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main
Alexander Henlein
  • Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main
Manuel Stoeckel
  • Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main
Andy Lücking
Andy Lücking
  • Not confirmed yet
Mark Klement
Mark Klement
  • Not confirmed yet
Dominik Mattern
Dominik Mattern
  • Not confirmed yet