Lab

Rhonda Lynne Wilson's Lab

About the lab

https://www.newcastle.edu.au/research/centre/digital-mental-health

Featured projects (8)

Project
An International research consortium developing digital health interventions to support the self-determination of health, well-being and quality of life for women throughout the normal life stages of peri-menopause and menopause. Co led by chief investigators Professor Rhonda Wilson (University of Newcastle, Australia) and Dr Camille Cronin (University of Essex, UK). Co investigators and Collaborators: Professor Marja Kaunonen (Tampere University, Finland) Dr Kerri-Ann Hughes (Massey University, New Zealand) Dr Janene Carey (University of Newcastle, Australia) Gemma Bidwell (University of Essex, UK) Professor Catherine Hungerford (Federation University, Australia).
Project
Menopause is a workplace issue

Featured research (2)

The rates of mental health hospitalisations in Australia are rising. This paper presents the findings of a study undertaken in a regional mental health unit. The aim of the study was to obtain user perspectives to inform the redesign of the unit, which provides inpatient mental health services to rural and regional adults. A qualitative descriptive study with data collected via focus groups and in‐depth interviews was undertaken with 38 participants, including current inpatients, carers and 27 staff members of a single regional inpatient mental health unit. The 25‐bed mental health inpatient unit accommodates adults from 18+ years of age. The mental health unit sits within a referral hospital precinct and is associated with community‐based mental health services within a large regional and rural Australian public health service. The analysis of interviews and focus groups with patients, carers and mental health professionals revealed three major themes congruent with the literature These were: Firstly, Theme 1: Rooms should be designed to promote physical security. Next, Theme 2: Purposeful planning to support interactions between users and systems will promote relational security. And finally, Theme 3: Optimizing service integrity should promote procedural security. Based on the themes arising from the study, a list of recommendations was produced to inform the design of a new build for a regional mental health unit. In particular, all users of the space should expect that the built environment will promote their physical security and psychological safety and accommodate a wide range of diversity and acuity. The aesthetics should align with the promotion of recovery in the context of person‐centred and trauma‐informed models of care. Designers should plan to alleviate boredom and accommodate meaningful wayfinding. Mental health nurses should have spaces that support their work without compromising their relational security with consumers. Building designers should optimize therapeutic environments to facilitate dignified intensive and stabilizing treatments and eliminate vicarious stigma associated with caring for people with mental illness. This study provides valuable insights from a community of users who have experienced receiving and delivering mental health care within a regional and rural mental health unit.
Background Nurses and other professionals working in mental health care, and those utilising it, will likely be aware that the sector has been the subject of scrutiny through numerous public inquiries and Royal Commissions over the years. Aim The aim of this paper is to understand the total number of high-profile public inquiries undertaken in relation to mental health in Australia over the last 30 years. Importantly, we then seek to quantify the likely contributions by the community, including by people with experience of mental illness and their supporters, to those inquiries and to consider the personal impacts and outcomes of those contributions. Methods Information available in the public domain (online) on Royal Commissions, parliamentary inquiries, and federal Commission inquiries held in Australia between 1991 and August 2021, relating to mental health, is drawn on, collated, and compared. Findings No less than 55 high-profile public inquiries relevant to mental health have been held over the last 30 years, involving more than 55,000 public submissions and 9,000 witnesses, among other contributions made by the community. A significant proportion of these include contributions made by people who use mental health services, who share their personal stories in a process that is acknowledged as being potentially traumatic. Discussion Despite this enormous effort by the community generally, and by people with experience of mental health care specifically, to effect change in the mental health sector through formal inquiry processes, analysis shows that key recommendation themes identified for mental health care 30 years ago remain current issues today. Conclusion We see a role for mental health nurses together – to call on the Federal and State Governments to fund and implement the meaningful change required to improve the mental health system, as identified in the long-line of inquiries to date. With major budget announcements for mental health care recently made in Australia, now is the time to influence policy direction and implementation into the future.

Lab head

Rhonda Lynne Wilson
Department
  • School of Nursing and Midwifery
About Rhonda Lynne Wilson
  • Professor of Nursing, University of Newcastle, NSW, Australia. Professor of Nursing, Massey University, New Zealand. Mental health and digital health researcher Credentialed Mental Health Nurse and Registered Nurse Twitter: @RhondaWilsonMHN Facebook: www.facebook.com/EMentalHealthNurse Facebook: www.facebook.com/ResearchReady Wordpress: https://rhondawilsonmhn.com LinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/in/assocprofrhondawilson

Members (6)

Janene Carey
  • The University of Newcastle, Australia
Oliver Higgins
  • The University of Newcastle, Australia
Cathy Francis
  • The University of Newcastle, Australia
Elizabeth Hove
  • The University of Newcastle, Australia
Judye Margetts
  • The University of Newcastle, Australia
Eman Alsolami
  • King Abdulaziz University
Erin Joanne Rooney
Erin Joanne Rooney
  • Not confirmed yet
Jacob Mabil Atem
Jacob Mabil Atem
  • Not confirmed yet
Cathy Francis
Cathy Francis
  • Not confirmed yet
Darrin Riggon
Darrin Riggon
  • Not confirmed yet
Jacob Atem
Jacob Atem
  • Not confirmed yet
Eric Agyemang-Duah
Eric Agyemang-Duah
  • Not confirmed yet
Katrina Ward
Katrina Ward
  • Not confirmed yet
Peter Rae
Peter Rae
  • Not confirmed yet

Alumni (2)

Jette Marcussen
  • University of Southern Denmark
Anders Møller Jensen
  • VIA University College