Lab

Research and Educational Center Functional Nanomaterials

About the lab

REC Functional Nanomaterials (FN) brings together a unique set of scientific and laboratory equipment for the nanomaterials synthesis and studying their critical properties (physical and chemical parameters, structural, magnetic, optical, etc. properties). This enables the REC FN to develop a wide variety of nanotechnology-based products: from novel materials for nanoelectronics and spintronics which is a material science problem to R&D work on hardening coatings for construction, metal, pharmaceutical, and other industries.
The research team works in an interdisciplinary science and technology field studying the properties of materials and development the devices with basic building blocks of only a few tens of nanometres in size.

Featured projects (2)

Project
X-ray Reflectometry and Diffraction experiments.
Project
Multilayer structures for X-ray standing wave technique. Multilayer structures as X-ray monochromators and mirrors.

Featured research (19)

Two new operation modes, “pink beam” excitation, which has the energy bandwidth defined by X-ray mirrors and filters, and “broadband beam”, where the energy bandwidth is defined by the reflection from a multilayer monochromator, were implemented at the SuperXAS beamline of the Swiss Light Source (SLS). These setups allow measuring non-resonance X-ray emission spectra (XES) with 2-3 orders of magnitude higher incident flux than non-resonant XES measurements with a monochromatic incident beam. For the broadband beam mode, a Mo/Si multilayer structure was designed, with which the energy can be tuned in the 5-17 keV range. The multilayer demonstrates a relatively large energy bandwidth of 4±0.2 % through the whole energy range and a reflectivity of 23-60 % which increases with energy. We show that by using pink beam mode one can investigate the electronic structure of photocatalytic intermediates through time-resolved core-to-core XES experiments of diluted samples with a concentration of the element of interest of ∼1 mM. Broadband beam mode is optimal for valence-to-core XES experiments and allow to avoid the excitation of additional KLβ satellites that can complicate the interpretation of spectra.
This review summarizes Raman scattering data for different stable and metastable phases of vanadium oxides. We analyze literature data on crystal structures existing in the binary vanadium‐oxygen system. If available, we combine these data with experimental Raman spectra and relations of vibrational modes with the atomic arrangements and motions in crystals. Further, we employ arc sputtering to produce vanadium oxide films, including α and β‐vanadium, V14O6, VO, V2O3, V3O5, several phases of VO2, V6O13, V3O7, and V2O5, as confirmed by X‐ray diffraction analysis. All the films are studied using Raman spectroscopy: low‐ and high‐temperature V3O5 and VOx (1.67 < x < 2) are investigated for the first time. We demonstrate that a significant change in the V3O5 spectrum takes place along the phase transition occurring at approximately 140 °C. Moreover, we describe differences between the spectra of VO2 polymorphs produced without doping impurities, VO2 (M1), VO2 (M2), and VO2 (T). Finally, we analyze conflicting data on V7O16 and V3O7 and provide an explanation of the observed spectra. Overall, 21 spectra are identified for 53 known phases. Our work is aimed at laying the groundwork for easy identification of vanadium oxide phases in thin films, using Raman spectroscopy. We review the available data on the structures and Raman spectra of vanadium oxides, VOx. We also present our own results concerning such phases as α‐ and β‐vanadium, V14O6, VO, V2O3, V3O5, several polymorphs of VO2, V6O13, V3O7, and V2O5, produced by arc sputtering in the form of thin films. In total, 21 spectra are distinguished among 53 known phases.
Periodical multilayer (ML) structures can be used as generators of X-ray standing waves (XSW) for investigation of objects and processes on solid/liquid and solid/gas interfaces. In this paper, we investigate the specific requirements to the structural properties of the multilayer structures for XSW application. We consider the effect of typical defects in the ML structure on the X-ray standing wave formation and show that the X-ray standing wave is very robust against the random imperfection in the multilayer structure. In contrast, the roughness of the topmost layer will have a strong influence on the XSW experimental results, as the ML serves as a support for the investigated objects, so that the surface geometry gets directly translated into the objects. In the experimental part of this work, we have used the ion-beam deposition to grow Ni/Al metal- and metal oxide-based multilayers and investigate with AFM their surface quality. The presented results demonstrate that metal oxides can be successfully used as basic material for X-ray multilayer standing wave generators.
We report here the growth and functional properties of silicon-based nanowhisker (NW) diodes produced by the vapor–liquid–solid process using a pulsed laser deposition technique. For the first time, we demonstrate that this method could be employed to control the size and shape of silicon NWs by using a two-component catalyst material (Au/Cu ≈ 60:1). During the NW growth, copper is distributed on the outer surface of the NW, whereas gold sticks as a droplet to its top. The length of NWs is defined by the total amount of copper in the catalyst alloy droplet. The measurements of the electrical transport properties revealed that in contact with the substrate, individual NWs demonstrate typical I–V diode characteristics. Our approach can become an important new tool in the design of novel electronic components.
The effect of heat treatment on the structural and magnetic properties of bilayered FeOx/Fe thin films grown by pulsed laser deposition on pre-oxidized amorphous SiO2/Si substrates has been studied. Post-deposition vacuum thermal annealing leads to remarkable changes in the structural and magnetic properties of the FeOx layer, which has been investigated by the combination of scanning electron and atomic force microscopy, Raman scattering spectroscopy and conversion electron Mössbauer spectroscopy. FeOx layer deposited at room temperature on top of the polycrystalline Fe underlayer is amorphous with the smooth surface (root mean square roughness ∼0.5nm). Vacuum thermal annealing of the FeOx/Fe stack at T=500°C leads to the formation of a polycrystalline Fe3O4/Fe thin film structure with the magnetite nucleation centers of an average size of 100nm. The formation of the exact magnetite phase depends on the annealing conditions as shown by in-situ Raman and Mössbauer spectroscopy investigations.

Members (12)

Vadim V. Sikolenko
  • Karlsruhe Institute of Technology
Evgeny Clementyev
  • Immanuel Kant Baltic Federal University
Dmitrii Serebrennikov
  • Immanuel Kant Baltic Federal University
Olga Dikaya
  • Immanuel Kant Baltic Federal University
Oksana Yurkevich
  • CIC nanoGUNE Consolider
Uliana Koneva
  • Immanuel Kant Baltic Federal University
Alexey Grunin
  • Immanuel Kant Baltic Federal University
Anatoly Kozlov
  • Immanuel Kant Baltic Federal University
Petr Shvets
Petr Shvets
  • Not confirmed yet
Ksenia Maksimova
Ksenia Maksimova
  • Not confirmed yet

Alumni (4)

Svetlana Lyatun
  • Immanuel Kant Baltic Federal University
Ivan Lyatun
  • Immanuel Kant Baltic Federal University
Nataliya Klimova
  • Immanuel Kant Baltic Federal University