Lab

O. A. T. Ebuehi's Lab

Featured research (3)

Alafia barteri (Apocynaceae) is a climbing shrub having white or pink flowers. Traditionally, it has been used to treat diseases like malaria, sickle cell anemia, and eye infections. This research is focused on investigating the antioxidant and anti-arthritic activities of the aqueous and ethanol leaf and root extract of Alafia barteri plant in vitro. In-vitro antioxidant methods used were 2, 2 -diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl assay, reducing power activity and hydrogen peroxide scavenging assay while the anti-arthritic activity was studied using the assay method of protein denaturation. Results revealed that aqueous and ethanol root extracts scavenge free radicals, thus inhibiting damage caused by oxidative stress in arthritis while the ethanol extracts of both the leaf and roots had good anti-arthritic activities as seen in its ability to decrease protein denaturation.
Alafia barteri leaves are valued for its efficacy in the traditional medicine system in Nigeria. It has been used over the years for the treatment of various diseases some of which include malaria, sickle cell anaemia, and eye infections. This has necessitated the evaluation of its chemical composition to ensure its safety for human use. This study was undertaken to evaluate the phytochemical constituents, proximate and elemental composition of Alafia barteri leaf. The phytochemicals and proximate analyses were carried out using standard methods. The mineral elements were analyzed using atomic absorption spectrophotometry. The proximate analysis of the leaves showed it contained moisture 8.6%, crude fibre 48.29%, protein 15.84%, carbohydrate 13.13%, lipids 7.23% and ash 6.75%. The mineral analysis of the leaves revealed the presence of the following minerals: calcium (96.2 mg/100 g), manganese (74.8 mg/100 g), iron (46.2 mg/100 g), magnesium (31.05 mg/100 g), potassium (3.3 mg/ 100 g), sodium (2.9 mg/100 g). The phytochemical screening indicated the presence of flavonoids, phenols, tannins, anthraquinones, phlobatannins, cardiac glycosides and steroids. The study revealed the leaves of Alafia barteri to be a potential source of minerals and nutrients needed for human nutrition.

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Members (1)

Ikeoluwapo Olanike Kolawole
  • Mountain Top University
O.S. Odesanmi
O.S. Odesanmi
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O. A. T. Ebuehi
O. A. T. Ebuehi
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Esther Ayomide Awoyera
Esther Ayomide Awoyera
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Osaretin Ebuehi
Osaretin Ebuehi
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Omolola Odesanmi
Omolola Odesanmi
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Jimoh Yusuf
Jimoh Yusuf
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Ibrahim Badmus
Ibrahim Badmus
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