Lab

Nabil Fakhre's Lab

Featured projects (1)

Project
Analytical chem.

Featured research (17)

The use of macrocyclic compounds to remove organic dyes is fascinating because they have a wide surface area range and can be used for different things. new (14E, 34E)-7-Hydroxy-7, 8, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27-Octahydro-6H, 16H, 33H Tetrabenzo[f,k,u,z][1,5,13,20]Tetraoxacycloheptacosine-16,33-Dione (HOTTD) was obtained by a simple high-dilution method, and characterized by FTIR, ¹ H-NMR, FESEM, EDX, and XRD. It worked well in removing organic dyes from aqueous solutions. Contact time, pH, dosage, initial concentration and temperature were studied. The optimum conditions were achieved by using 20 mg/L dye concentration, 50 mg dose of adsorbent and pH 9.0 at room temperature. The adsorption process was remarkably fast and reached equilibrium within 10 min for both Brilliant Green and Malachite Green while 70 min for Safranin. The batch adsorption experiments followed a pseudo 2 nd order and Langmuir model with maximum adsorption capacity 19.26 mg/g, 18.28 mg/g, and 14.35 mg/g for Brilliant Green, Malachite green and Safranin respectively. The process was endothermic and spontaneous in nature. Adsorbent regeneration test provides an excellent value 5 times.
A new aldehyde 2,2’-[propane-1,3-diylbis(oxy)] dibenzaldehyde was synthesized from refluxing 2-hydroxy acetophenone and 2-hydroxy 1,3-dichloropropanean in an alcoholic medium. The compositions and properties of the new aldehyde compound were characterized by elemental analysis, FTIR, and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy studies. The extracted chitosan was made to react with a new aldehyde to form a Schiff base by a suitable method. The effects of initial concentration of metal ions, exposure time, imine weight, and pH on the adsorption of Cu(II), Cr(III), and Zn(II) metal ions were examined. An adsorption batch experiment was conducted. The adsorption process followed a second-order reaction and Langmuir model with qe 25 mg/g, 121 mg/g, and 26.31 mg/g for Cu(II), Zn(II), and Cr(III) respectively. The Gibbs free energy showed a negative value and the adsorption/desorption tests provided a high value 5 times.
The new adsorbent was prepared by mixing cellulose with dicyclohexyl-18- crown-6 via microwave irradiation method and it was used to remove lead ions from aqueous solution. In contrast to the traditional way (in which grafted polymers are produced by using chemical-free radical producers), this method is rapid, reproducible, and gives a high quality product. Different physicochemical techniques such as FTIR, SEM, and XRD and TGA were used for the characterization of the produced adsorbent. Based on the ANOVA statistical value, the adsorption of Pb2+ ion onto grafted cellulose has been found to be significant, with very low probability (p) values (<0.001). The pH and initial concentration were observed to be the most significant factors that affected the Pb2+ ion removal from the analysis of variance. Pseudo-second-order and Langmuir equations were applied to the adsorption of Pb2+ ion and under the optimized conditions, the maximum absorption capacity in modified cellulose of Pb2+ was 58.3 mg/g. Various factors which affect metal ion adsorption, including temperature, power of hydrogen, shaking time, adsorbent quantity, and metal ions concentration were studied. More importantly, the adsorbent could be reused by using 0.1 M nitric acid.
Polymers of Intrinsic Microporosity (PIMs) constitute another class of amorphous microporous polymers. PIMs display high SSA (specific surface area) (due to their rigid and contorted molecular structure (Fig. 1a), which prevents efficient packing. In particular, PIMs do not possess rotational freedom along the polymer backbone, which ensures that the macromolecular components cannot rearrange their conformation. Several proposed methods for synthesizing different polymers have been recorded due to their potential properties and wide applications in recent years. This review will cover the origin of the early work on PIMs, their synthesis and structural characterization, properties, and potential applications that are broadly recognized as a potential next-generation membrane material for gas separations due to their ultra-permeable characteristics. This mini-review aims to provide an overview of these materials, from science of its chemistry to applications. PIMs-based gas separation membranes applications of this type cover a wide spectrum including their gas diffusion mechanisms and separation performance, and many other fields such as using PIM membrane in water purification from chemical pollutants. Membrane separation process is cost-effective and environmentally friendly with small physical footprints. Interests of membrane technology have been growing increasingly in past two decades. Key areas that membranes are at play include carbon dioxide (CO2) capture, nitrogen generation, hydrogen/helium recovery, natural gas sequestration, and biogas purification (Bernardo, Drioli, & Golemme).
Among inorganic anions, cyanide is a potent toxicant in environment. Its species are historically known as the most harmful chemical pollutants of the environment to directly affect human health and some aquatics activity, even at minimum levels. Cyanide compounds are widely available with various chemical compositions and are applied in many industrial fields. This mini-review focused on the cyanide species and their measurement utilizing several analytical techniques. Detailed information on an indirectly determined cyanide species in various environmental samples was also reviewed using a flame atomic absorption spectrometer equipped with a flow injection system (FIA-FAAS). Obtained various analytical performance properties of an indirectly measured free cyanide ion in various samples using FAAS investigated from this study.

Lab head

Nabil Fakhre
Department
  • Department of Chemistry
About Nabil Fakhre
  • 1- Adsorption and removal of metal ions and dyes. 2- Using various derivative spectroscopic techniques for determination of organic and inorganic species.

Members (26)

Hemn A. Qader
  • Hawler Medical University
Tamathir Abbas Hamoudi
  • Ninevah University
Nehmat K.Ahmed
  • Salahaddin University - Erbil
Bnar Ibrahim
  • University of Raparin
Mohammad Salim Abdullah
  • Salahaddin University - Erbil
Mohammed Abdullah Ahmed
  • Erbil Technical College
Hawraz Sami Khalid
  • Salahaddin University - Erbil
Sarmad Bahjat Dikran
Sarmad Bahjat Dikran
  • Not confirmed yet
Bnar Ibrahim
Bnar Ibrahim
  • Not confirmed yet
S.A. Rahim
S.A. Rahim
  • Not confirmed yet
Dashty K. Ali
Dashty K. Ali
  • Not confirmed yet
Ahmed Anwar
Ahmed Anwar
  • Not confirmed yet
Ahmad Abdulhassan
Ahmad Abdulhassan
  • Not confirmed yet
Chinar M Rished
Chinar M Rished
  • Not confirmed yet
Hussain Abid
Hussain Abid
  • Not confirmed yet