Lab

NGALAB

About the lab

NGALAB (Next Generation Agronomics Laboratory) own cutting edge technology in this fields:

Metagenomics
We are specialized in microbiome analysis related to the agricultural environment, which include rhizosphere and phyllosphere. We carry out metagenomic analyses of the 16S rRNA gene for bacteria and 18S rRNA gene for fungi, offering end-to-end microbiome research services. Instrument used: Illumina miSeq

Metabolomics
NGALAB centre its efforts on plant and microbial metabolome: by quantifying the changes taking place inside cells at specific times and under specific environmental conditions, we offer an unbiased view of the complex changes and interactions that take place in functioning biochemical networks. Instrument used: New Agilent UHPLC-ESI-QTOF

Featured projects (1)

Project
The project is a collaborative effort to characterise microbial communities across different agricultural environments. We investigate the influence of our microbial inoculants on the soil microbiome of tomato, grapevine, peach and pepper plants. We aim to shed light on the metabolomic response of the plants derived by the application of mycorrhiza, Trichoderma and PGPR. By integrating metabolomic and microbiome analysis, the information from this coordinated effort could help provide missing links between soil taxonomic and functional diversity on plant health and productivity. NGALAB has received support from the CDTI (Centro para el Desarrollo Tecnológico Industrial) and ERDF (European Regional Development Fund) (Grant IDI-20170913)

Featured research (3)

Microbial-based biostimulants can improve crop productivity by modulating cell metabolic pathways including hormonal balance. However, little is known about the microbial-mediated molecular changes causing yield increase. The present study elucidates the metabolomic modulation occurring in pepper (Capsicum annuum L.) leaves at the vegetative and reproductive phenological stages, in response to microbial-based biostimulants. The arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi Rhizoglomus irregularis and Funneliformis mosseae, as well as Trichoderma koningii, were used in this work. The application of endophytic fungi significantly increased total fruit yield by 23.7% compared to that of untreated plants. Multivariate statistics indicated that the biostimulant treatment substantially altered the shape of the metabolic profile of pepper. Compared to the untreated control, the plants treated with microbial biostimulants presented with modified gibberellin, auxin, and cytokinin patterns. The biostimulant treatment also induced secondary metabolism and caused carotenoids, saponins, and phenolic compounds to accumulate in the plants. Differential metabolomic signatures indicated diverse and concerted biochemical responses in the plants following the colonization of their roots by beneficial microorganisms. The above findings demonstrated a clear link between microbial-mediated yield increase and a strong up-regulation of hormonal and secondary metabolic pathways associated with growth stimulation and crop defense to environmental stresses.
Microbial-based biostimulants can improve crop productivity by modulating cell metabolic pathways including hormonal bal-ance. However, little is known about the microbial-mediated molecular changes causing yield increase. The present studyelucidates the metabolomic modulation occurring in pepper (Capsicum annuum L.) leaves at the vegetative and reproductivephenological stages in response to microbial-based biostimulants containing the arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi Rhizoglomus irreg-ularis and Funneliformis mosseae as well as Trichoderma koningii. Application of endophytic fungi significantly increased totalfruit yield by 23.7% compared to that of untreated plants. Multivariate statistics indicated that the biostimulant treatmentsubstantially altered the shape of the metabolic profile of pepper. Compared to the untreated control, the plants treated withmicrobial biostimulants presented with modified gibberellin, auxin, and cytokinin production and distribution. The biostimu-lant treatment also induced secondary metabolism and caused carotenoids, saponins, and phenolic compounds to accumulatein the plants. Differential metabolomic signatures indicated diverse and concerted biochemical responses in the plants followingthe colonisation of their roots by beneficial microorganisms. The above findings demonstrated a clear link between microbial-mediated yield increase and a strong up-regulation of hormonal and secondary metabolic pathways associated with growthstimulation and crop defence to environmental stresses.

Members (1)

Veronica Cirino
Veronica Cirino
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