Lab

Giovanni Peri's Lab

About the lab

Giovanni Peri at the Global MIgration Center
doing research on economics of migration

Featured research (5)

Using United States Census data between 1970 and 2017, we analyze the economic assimilation of subsequent arrival cohorts of Mexicans and Central Americans by comparing their earnings and employment probability to those of natives with similar age and education. We find that, on average, these immigrants started with an earnings gap of 40–45% and eliminated half of it within 20 years of arrival. Recent cohorts that arrived after 1995 performed better than earlier cohorts in that they had smaller initial earnings gaps and faster convergence. Additionally, the most recent cohorts entered the United States without an employment rate disadvantage, and they surpassed natives within 10 years. We also find that Mexicans and Central Americans working in the construction sector and those living in nonenclave and urban areas had faster earnings convergence than the others.
We examine the consequences of a significant return-migration episode, during which at least 400,000 Mexicans returned to Mexico between 1929 and 1934, on U.S. workers’ labor market outcomes. To identify a causal effect, we instrument the county-level drop in Mexican population with the size of the Mexican communities in 1910 and its interaction with proxies of repatriation costs. Using individual-level linked Census data from 1930–1940, we find that Mexican repatriations resulted in reduced employment and occupational downgrading for U.S. natives. These patterns were stronger for low-skilled workers and for workers in urban locations.
International migration is an important channel of material improvement for individuals and their offspring. The movement of people across country borders, especially from less developed to richer countries, has a substantial impact in several dimensions. First, it affects the migrants themselves by allowing them to achieve higher income as a result of their higher productivity in the destination country. It also increases the expected income for their offspring. Second, it affects the destination country through the impact on labor markets, productivity, innovation, demographic structure, fiscal balance, and criminality. Third, it can have a significant impact on the countries of origin. It may lead to loss of human capital, but it also creates a flow of remittances and increases international connections in the form of trade, FDI, and technological transfers. This chapter surveys our understanding of how migration affects growth and inequality through the impact on migrants themselves as well as on the destination and origin countries.

Lab head

Giovanni Peri
Department
  • Department of Economics

Members (4)

Michel Beine
  • University of Luxembourg
Zachariah Rutledge
  • Michigan State University
Mette Foged
  • University of Copenhagen
Jongkwan Lee
  • Korea Development Institute
Francesco D'Amuri
Francesco D'Amuri
  • Not confirmed yet
Vasil Yasenov
Vasil Yasenov
  • Not confirmed yet
Janis Kreuder
Janis Kreuder
  • Not confirmed yet
Agnese Romitii
Agnese Romitii
  • Not confirmed yet