Lab

FRIC - Fire Research and Innovation Centre

About the lab

The main objective of FRIC is to increase knowledge within the field of fire science in order to support decisions and develop better solutions providing increased fire safety in buildings. FRIC shall strengthen cooperation and lead to a long-term increase of competence and dissemination of knowledge within the fire safety field. The research is organized into four work packages:

1. Evidence-based decision-making within fire safety
2. Fire dynamics and modeling
3. Building Technology and design
4. Fire safety measures and new technology.

FRIC is led by RISE Fire Research in Trondheim, with NTNU and SINTEF as research partners. FRIC has partners from both private and public sector.

Full info and more details:
https://fric.no/en
@FRICfirecentre

Featured projects (10)

Project
The project aims to increase the fundamental state-of-the-art knowledge on smouldering fire dynamics, in particular, how smouldering is affected by cooling. Smouldering is non-flaming combustion with substantial potential for toxic gases. Extinguishing such fires is a severe challenge. Field and laboratory studies show limited success using water or gas, and manual removal of the fuel is often necessary to obtain complete extinguishment. Recently, cooling has been demonstrated at a small scale as a potential new method. By using a water purged cooling pipe, direct fuel-water contact is avoided, swelling of the fuel is avoided as well as channeling of extinguishing agent, scattering of glowing embers and water run-off to the environment. Cooling on the outside of the sample will also be of interest.
Project
The aim of this project is to collect and systematize information and data from real fires to increase the knowledge about fire development, direct and underlying causes of fires, fire risks and the effect of fire safety measures. Collecting and learning from experiences from fires of specific interest will be a continuous process, and a system for registration of data will be developed.
Project
The project will explore possibilities of efficient fire extinguishing by fixed systems for buildings and by equipment to be used by fire brigades during firefighting. The project will focus on extinguishing system and methods using small amounts of water, and mainly for residential buildings and buildings in densely built areas. Methods for documentation of extinguishing effect will be investigated and a proposal for documentation of alternative systems to regular sprinkler systems will be developed. The project will also explore possibilities for external extinguishing systems for wood buildings in densely built areas, possibly by modification and adaption of methods and equipment used in other applications (e.g. in the offshore industry, maritime applications) to develop innovative solutions for buildings.
Project
The project will build on findings from earlier projects on characteristics of vulnerable groups and fire fatalities, and on fire safety measures for these groups and for dwellings in general. Communication of existing knowledge will be an important part of this project, but also development of innovative new solutions.collaboration with the fire service is crucial. Input from parties with an interest in fire safety in dwellings (e.g. health care, social service, relevant industry, building owners etc.) will be collected and possibilities for innovations explored.
Project
The project addresses the dual challenge that firefighters meet, consisting of exposure to toxic smoke and inadequate metabolic heat dissipation in the line of duty, both able to cause serious health problems. The project uses a cross scientific approach including work physiology, user-centred design, material science and garment manufacturers. Test facilities at RISE Fire Research and the Work Physiology laboratory at SINTEF will be used. The aim is to develop methods and criteria for evaluating the performance of fire fighter's clothing.

Featured research (12)

Fires are devastating events that may harm humans, properties and the environment. Authorities, organisations, companies and societies should be able to learn from fire incidents to reduce the probability and impact of future fires. To achieve a reduction in fires and their consequences, an effort is needed from multiple actors and both technical, organisational and individual changes would be necessary. Importantly, we therefore consider change as a prerequisite for learning. So how can we as a society change or modify our efforts for prevention and mitigation of fires? A learning approach often starts with some form of inquiry about the occurred accidents – an investigation. This investigation can take many forms: the fire services’ own evaluations of the response to a fire, an authority’s assessments of the compliance and fit of their regulations, a company’s analysis of internal rules and organisation, and the police’s investigation of criminal issues. Investigations require highly skilled professionals using often multidisciplinary skills such as knowledge in human behaviour, fire dynamics, electrical systems, mechanical processes and many more. A fire investigator may use many different techniques and tactics, to figure out how the fire started, what fault led to the fire, what made the fire develop the way it did and, also what factors and measures that worked well in the fire. The investigator can work for the fire service, the police, insurance companies, hired private fire investigators or in larger companies, to mention a few. However, not all fires are investigated in Norway, and there is also a large number of incidents that is concluded with an unknown fire cause. The aim of our research has been to increase the society’s capacity to learn from fires. We have two main objectives contributing to the aim: 1. Obtain knowledge on the preconditions for learning from fires in Norway. 2. Provide recommendations to increase learning from fires in Norway.
This is the abstract from Nordic Fire and Safety Days conference, from the FRIC project "Learning from fires in Norway". This abstract focuses on the investigation phase of that process.
Modern buildings are being built with increasingly complex technical installations and energy systems. The introduction of renewable energy production, like photovoltaic (PV) panels on building roofs and facades and an increasing number of connected electric appliances, changes the way the electric power is distributed from production to end-user. The difference in production and demand for energy over time also gives incentives for installing energy storage systems. Electric energy can be stored in batteries, transferred into hydrogen gas via electrolysis or stored as thermal energy for use later. The current work presents an overview of an ongoing study in the Fire Research and Innovation Centre (FRIC), on fire safety implications related to implementing new technology for energy storage and production. The focus is on the built environment such as dwellings and office buildings situated in the Nordic countries. This study builds on previous studies of related topics.
Based on an experimental study of self-sustained smol-dering in a granular biomass fuel bed [1], a compre-hensive three-dimensional numerical model was developed. The model (computational fluid dynamics - discrete element method solver) considers the com-plex heterogeneous bed structure of wood pellets storage (Fig. 1), describing the interaction between the granular fuel itself and the transfer of heat and oxy-gen. It includes a Lagrangian descrip-tion of the fuel bed (instead of the com-monly employed volume averaged continuum assump-tion), which allows the individual treat-ment of particle shrinkage and, hence, the model-ling of the changing fuel bed structure. Results and discussion Preliminary results show that the newly developed model, is able to simulate self-sustained smoldering after 6 h, when external heating is turned off (see Fig. 2). Furthermore, the model has shown the poten-tial to describe the most important characteristic of smoldering in granular fuel beds, including localized hotspots, and its random nature (see Fig 3). Since the particles are not resolved a coarse grid for the fluid flow can be employed reducing the numerical costs significantly compared to micro-scale models. The promising initial results motivated ongoing and future model improvements and validations focusing on: • different convective heat transfer correlations, • the overlap between different stages (drying, de-volatilization , fuel oxidation and char oxidation), • heat of reaction (devolatilization, fuel oxidation,and char oxidation), • kinetics (devolatilization, fuel oxidation, and charoxidation) and • a parameter study of numerical parameters.

Lab head

Anne Steen-Hansen
Department
  • Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering

Members (12)

Ragni Fjellgaard Mikalsen
  • RISE Fire Research AS
Nina K. Reitan
  • RISE Fire Research AS
Christoph Meraner
  • RISE Fire Research
Reidar Stølen
  • RISE Fire Research AS
Edvard Aamodt
  • RISE Fire Research Norway
Ivar S. Ertesvåg
Ivar S. Ertesvåg
  • Not confirmed yet
Reidar Stølen
Reidar Stølen
  • Not confirmed yet
erik westbye jacobsen
erik westbye jacobsen
  • Not confirmed yet

Alumni (4)

Karolina Storesund
  • Norwegian University of Science and Technology
Christian Sesseng
  • RISE Fire Research AS
Are Brandt
  • RISE Fire Research AS
Ragnar Wighus
  • SP Fire Research