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Esther Oluwakemi Oluwole's Lab

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Background: Diarrhoea is a leading cause of death among children under five years old globally. It remains a major cause of morbidity and mortality among this age group in Nigeria. Using simple home management, mothers play important roles in the prevention and control of diarrhoea among these children. Aim: This study aimed to assess mothers’ knowledge, attitude and practice in the prevention and home management of diarrhoeal diseases among children under five years old in Lagos, Nigeria. Setting: This study was conducted within the communities of Kosofe local government area of Lagos State, Nigeria. Methods: A descriptive cross-sectional study design was conducted using a multistage sampling technique. Data were collected using a structured interviewer-administered questionnaire and analysed using EPI info version 7.2.1. Chi-square statistic was used to test the association between variable at the level of significance of 5%. Results: A total of 360 respondents participated in this study. The mean age of the respondents was 32.5 ± 5.5 years. About 59.2% of respondents had good knowledge, 59.2% of them had positive attitude, and 53.1% of them had good practice towards prevention and home management of diarrhoea. Age (p = 0.007), occupation (p = 0.008) and level of education (p = 0.001) were significantly associated with practice of home management of diarrhoea among children under five years old. Conclusion: Educated, employed, and married mothers were more likely to have good prevention and home management practices towards diarrhoea in their children under five years old.
The increased intention of healthcare workers to leave the health sector is one of the many negative impacts of job dissatisfaction and poor working conditions among healthcare workers in Nigeria. This study assessed the level of job satisfaction and the intention of leaving the country or medical practice among primary healthcare workers in Lagos, Nigeria. The study was a descriptive cross-sectional among 235 respondents, selected using a multistage sampling method. An adapted self-administered questionnaire from the Minnesota questionnaire short form and the Job Description Index (JDI) was used for data collection. Data were analyzed with Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS) version 22.0. Descriptive statistics were performed while Chi-square was used to determine the association between categorical variables and the level of significance was set at p <0.05. About half (50.6%) of the healthcare workers were satisfied with their jobs. Highest score 37.00 (32-40) for job satisfaction was found in the domain of management process; while the lowest score 16.00 (13-20) was found in the salary domain. The majority of the healthcare workers 201(85.5%) had the intention of leaving Nigeria for a better opportunity abroad. Healthcare workers were satisfied with the management process but dissatisfied with pay. Targeted interventions to improve the morale of healthcare workers at the primary healthcare level is recommended.
Anti-retro viral therapy (ART) is a lifelong treatment and its effectiveness depends critically both on the efficacy of the antiretroviral drugs against the virus and achieving a very high level of adherence (> 95%) to the medications. This study evaluated the relationship between medication beliefs, locus of control and adherence to ART among people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA) in Lagos. A cross-sectional descriptive study was conducted on 302 HIV/AIDS clients receiving Highly Active Anti-Retroviral Therapy in the outpatient ART clinics of the 3 selected public health facilities in Lagos State. Only respondents confirmed and diagnosed to be HIV positive and had met the eligibility criteria for initiating ART, and were 18 years and above on Highly Active Anti-Retroviral Therapy (HAART) for not less than a year. A total of 302 HIV positive persons on HAART completed the study. They were mostly females (n=202; 66.9%) with a mean age of 39 ± 10 years. About a third (30%; n=90) of respondents were adjudged non-adherent. Those who were adjudged adherent were significantly younger than the non-adherents (P=0.001). However, there was no significant difference in the mean score for medication beliefs (Concern or Necessity) and locus of control (Internal, Powerful Others or Chance) between those who were adjudged adherent or non-adherent. There was no direct relationship observed between the locus of control, medication beliefs and adherence to medication among patients on HAART in Lagos, Nigeria. Interventions targeting these socio-cognitive parameters may not yield a further increase in adherence. Key words: Locus of control, medication belief, adherence, highly active anti-retroviral therapy (HAART), HIV/AIDS.
Background of the Study: Low adherence is an essential element responsible for impaired effectiveness and efficiency in the pharmacological treatment of hypertension. Patient satisfaction is an important measure of healthcare quality and is a crucial determinant of patients’ perspective on behavioural intention. Aims: This study determined the association between medication adherence and treatment satisfaction among hypertensive patients attending hypertension outpatient clinic in Lagos University Teaching Hospital (LUTH), Nigeria.
BACKGROUND Ebola Virus Disease (EVD) epidemics are associated with significant social stigma which is capable of disrupting the quality of life of the affected both directly and indirectly. Stigma is a major factor preventing access to health care services, which leads to late detection and treatment with further spread of EVD. Good knowledge is a critical component in increasing the likelihood of individual to adopt the prevention and health seeking behaviors. This research assessed the knowledge, factors affecting knowledge of EVD and victim's stigmatization in Lagos Nigeria. METHODS A descriptive cross-sectional study among 1982 respondents aged 18 years and above from five Local Government Areas (LGAs) in Lagos State was conducted using semi-structured and interviewer administered questionnaire. Data obtained was collated and analyzed using Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS) version 22. Chi square was used to test for association between variables with level of significance set at p< 0.05. RESULTS The mean age of respondents was 32.4±9.9 years. Most 1936 (97.7%) of the respondents had heard about EVD. About half 1092 (55.1%) of the respondents had secondary level of education. Majority of the respondents (97.9 %) had good knowledge. About half (47.0%) and (51.0%) of the respondents believed EVD can be prevented by drinking salt water and bathing with salt water respectively. More than half of the respondents 1350 (69.3%) were not willing to live in the same house with someone who had been cured of EVD while 1405 (72.1%) would not work in the same office with someone who had been cured of EVD and 1357 (70.8%) were not willing to allow their children to attend a school where student had died of EVD. Education was found to be statistically significant with level of knowledge. (p< 0.001) CONCLUSIONS Most of the respondents had good knowledge of EVD but misconceptions and stigmatization towards EVD survivors and contacts exists. Knowledge was found to be statistically significant with education and stigmatization of EVD's survivors and contacts. Hence, we suggest community-based education on EVD to correct misconceptions among the publics with emphasis on reduction of stigmatization towards EVD survivors and contacts.

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Akin Osibogun
  • College of Medicine University of Lagos/Lagos University Teaching Hospital
Kikelomo Ololade Wright
  • Lagos State University College of Medicine & Lagos State University Teaching Hospital
Olatokunbo Osibogun
  • Florida International University
Adebola Adejimi
  • University of Lagos
Olumuyiwa Odusanya
  • College of Medicine University of Lagos
Adeyinka Adeniran
  • Lagos State University
Olayinka Goodman
  • Lagos State University
Omowunmi Bakare
  • Lagos State University
Esther O. Oluwole
Esther O. Oluwole
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O O Fisher
O O Fisher
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T Ashipa
T Ashipa
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Okunade
Okunade
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OlumuyiwaOmotola Odusanya
OlumuyiwaOmotola Odusanya
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Olutoyin O. Sekoni
Olutoyin O. Sekoni
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Olufemi Thomas-Ogodo
Olufemi Thomas-Ogodo
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Faith E. Momoh
Faith E. Momoh
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