Lab

Eduardo Lopez Collazo's Lab

Featured research (3)

Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the second most deadly and third most commonly diagnosed cancer worldwide. There is significant heterogeneity among patients with CRC, which hinders the search for a standard approach for the detection of this disease. Therefore, the identification of robust prognostic markers for patients with CRC represents an urgent clinical need. In search of such biomarkers, a total of 114 patients with colorectal cancer and 67 healthy participants were studied. Soluble SIGLEC5 (sSIGLEC5) levels were higher in plasma from patients with CRC compared with healthy volunteers. Additionally, sSIGLEC5 levels were higher in exitus than in survivors, and the receiver operating characteristic curve analysis revealed sSIGLEC5 to be an exitus predictor (area under the curve 0.853; cut-off > 412.6 ng/mL) in these patients. A Kaplan–Meier analysis showed that patients with high levels of sSIGLEC5 had significantly shorter overall survival (hazard ratio 15.68; 95% CI 4.571–53.81; p ≤ 0.0001) than those with lower sSIGLEC5 levels. Our study suggests that sSIGLEC5 is a soluble prognosis marker and exitus predictor in CRC.
The ‘cancer cell fusion’ theory is controversial due to the lack of methods available to identify hybrid cells and to follow the phenomenon in patients. However, it seems to be one of the best explanations for both the origin and metastasis of primary tumors. Herein, we co-cultured lung cancer stem cells with human monocytes and analyzed the dynamics and properties of tumor-hybrid cells (THC), as well as the molecular mechanisms beneath this fusion process by several techniques: electron-microscopy, karyotyping, CRISPR-Cas9, RNA-seq, immunostaining, signaling blockage, among others. Moreover, mice models were assessed for in vivo characterization of hybrids colonization and invasiveness. Then, the presence of THCs in bloodstream and samples from primary and metastatic lesions were detected by FACS and immunofluorescence protocols, and their correlations with TNM stages established. Our data indicate that the generation of THCs depends on the expression of CD36 on tumor stem cells and the oxidative state and polarization of monocytes, the latter being strongly influenced by microenvironmental fluctuations. Highly oxidized M2-like monocytes show the strongest affinity to fuse with tumor stem cells. THCs are able to proliferate, colonize and invade organs. THC-specific cell surface signature CD36⁺CD14⁺PANK⁺ allows identifying them in matched primary tumor tissues and metastases as well as in bloodstream from patients with lung cancer, thus functioning as a biomarker. THCs levels in circulation correlate with TNM classification. Our results suggest that THCs are involved in both origin and spread of metastatic cells. Furthermore, they might set the bases for future therapies to avoid or eradicate lung cancer metastasis.
Sepsis is a global health priority. Despite thorough studies in mice models, its molecular and cellular basis remain unclear and there is no pharmacological effective treatment other than antimicrobial and supportive therapy. During sepsis, T cells exhaustion compromises patients outcome, and immune checkpoints (ICs) become crucial players in disease management. Here, a total of 425 patients with systemic inflammatory response criteria and 127 controls were studied. Soluble SIGLEC5 (sSIGLEC5) levels in plasma were higher in patients with sepsis compared to the other groups and even higher in those patients with septic-shock. sSIGLEC5 plasma levels were higher in non-survivors than in survivors and ROC curves analysis revealed sSIGLEC5 as a survival marker (cut-off ≤ 523.6 ng/mL). In vitro experiments illustrated how SIGLEC5 impaired CD8+ proliferation through binding to PSGL1. Blocking the SIGLEC5/PSGL1 axis reverted the latter effect. Mechanistically, SIGLEC5 overexpression was driven by HIF1α. Exogenous sSIGLEC5 accelerated death and magnified acute lung injury in mice models. Our data demonstrates how plasma sSIGLEC5 level on admission predicts death and stratifies patients with sepsis. This molecule exhibits the hallmarks of an IC ligand.

Lab head

Members (15)

Luis Madero
  • Hospital del Niño Jesús
Eduardo Lopez-Granados
  • Hospital Universitario La Paz
Juan Carlos Ruiz-Rodríguez
  • University Hospital Vall d'Hebron
Ana Sastre
  • Hospital Universitario La Paz
Alejandro Martin Quiros
  • Hospital Universitario La Paz
Jaime Valentín
  • Hospital Universitario La Paz
José Avendaño Ortiz
  • Hospital Universitario La Paz
Esther Aleo Luján
  • Hospital Clínico San Carlos
Roser Ferrer
Roser Ferrer
  • Not confirmed yet
Charbel Maroun-Eid
Charbel Maroun-Eid
  • Not confirmed yet
Maria Del Carmen Mendez Diaz
Maria Del Carmen Mendez Diaz
  • Not confirmed yet