Lab

ECOSPHERE

About the lab

The ECOSPHERE research group aims to study both aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems that are continuously challenged by natural and anthropogenic stressors. Its research focuses on acquiring fundamental and applied knowledge at different levels of structural and functional organisation in order to underpin environmental management decisions.

Featured research (3)

Water pollution may be a serious environmental problem for Lake Hawassa, an important fishing and recreational site as well as a drinking-water source in Ethiopia. The present study aims at determining the distribution of metals and metalloids in the lake's water, sediment and fish tissues and assessing the resulting human health and ecological risks. Metals were detected in both abiotic and biotic samples. In water, only the Hg concentration was significantly different among sampling sites. The average concentration of As, Cd, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb, and Zn in water were below the environmental quality thresholds, thus not having potentially adverse effect on aquatic life. In sediment, significant differences in metals concentration among sites were found for As, Cd, Pb, Co, Zn and Hg (p < 0.05). Exceedances of As, Cr, Cu, Hg, Ni and Zn were found in sediment, with Cr, Ni and Zn above the probable effect concentration and being potentially toxic to aquatic life. Fish stored more metals in their liver than in their muscle. The concentration of metals in carnivorous fish (Barbus intermedius) was not higher in muscle and liver than those in herbivores fish (Oreochromis niloticus). The Bioaccumulation Factor of Cr in all fish species muscle was >1. The Biota-Sediment Accumulation Factor of all metals in all fish species muscle were <1. Positive correlations among metals in water and correlations among metals in sediment were found, indicating a potential common pollution source. Positive correlation of total organic carbon with Cd, Co and Se and clay content with Pb, As and Hg was found and may imply that metals are easily adsorbed by the organic matter and fine sediment. With respect to the measured metals no potential health risk due to consumption of fish from Lake Hawassa was observed.
Mangroves are widely recognised as key ecosystems for climate change mitigation as they capture and store significant amounts of sediment organic carbon (SOC). Yet, there is incomplete knowledge on how sources of SOC and their differential preservation vary between mangrove sites in relation to environmental gradients. To address this, sediment depth profiles were sampled from mangrove sites ranging from river-dominated to marine-dominated sites and including old and young mangrove sites in the Guayas delta (Ecuador). The stable carbon isotope ratios (δ13C) and the elemental composition (OC %, C : N) of sediment profiles, local vegetation (i.e. autochthonous carbon) and externally supplied suspended particulate matter (i.e. allochthonous carbon) were obtained to assess variations in the amount and sources of SOC at different locations throughout the delta. In general, across all sites, we found that increasing SOC contents and stocks are associated with decreasing δ13C and increasing C : N ratios, indicating that SOC stocks and sources are intrinsically related. The SOC stocks (down to 0.64 m depth profiles) are significantly lower in young mangrove sites (46–55 Mg C ha−1) than in old sites (78–92 Mg C ha−1). The SOC in the young mangrove sites is mainly of allochthonous origin (estimated on average at 79 %), whereas in the old sites there is a slight dominance of autochthonous OC (on average 59 %). Moreover, from river- to marine-dominated sites, a pattern was found of increasing SOC stocks and increasing autochthonous SOC contribution. These observed differences along the two studied gradients are hypothesised to be mainly driven by (1) expected higher sedimentation rates in the river-dominated and lower-elevation younger sites, thereby `diluting' the SOC content and decreasing the relative autochthonous contribution, and (2) potential differences in preservation of the different SOC sources. Our finding of high contributions of allochthonous SOC, especially in young mangroves, implies that this carbon is not originating from CO2 sequestration by the mangrove ecosystem itself but is externally supplied from other terrestrial, marine or estuarine ecosystems. We argue that accounting for lower SOC stocks and higher contribution of allochthonous SOC in young and river-dominated mangrove sites, as compared to old and marine-dominated sites, is particularly relevant for designing and valuing nature-based climate mitigation programmes based on mangrove reforestation.
Although estuaries are considered important pathways in the global carbon cycle, carbon dynamics in tropical estuaries is relatively understudied. Here, the tidal, seasonal and spatial variability of particulate organic carbon (POC), dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC), carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4), among other biogeochemical variables related to carbon cycling, were studied in the Guayas river delta (Ecuador) to document the sources, processing and fluxes of these carbon forms. All variables were studied during a semi-diurnal (13 h) tidal cycle and along river transects at low and high tides, all carried out during one dry and rainy season. POC and total suspended matter (TSM) strongly covaried and peaked at high tidal flow velocities during a tidal cycle and at high river discharge during the rainy season, suggesting that resuspension of bottom sediments and/or surface erosion in the river catchment were a dominant source of particulate matter in the water column. The δ¹³C of POC, (from ∼-22‰ to ∼ -27‰) showed an increasing contribution of marine phytoplankton to the POC pool as moving downstream along the delta during the dry season. Upstream DIC concentrations (∼1200 μmol L⁻¹) were high in the Guayas river delta as compared to other tropical estuarine systems, and the δ¹³C of DIC revealed a shift from a more phytoplankton dominated source in the dry season and downstream (∼-4‰) to a relatively more terrestrial source in the rainy season and upstream (∼-12.5‰). Both DIC and its δ¹³C showed slight but consistent deviations from conservative mixing that hint at inputs of ¹³C depleted DIC from mineralization along the delta. High values of the partial pressure of CO2 (pCO2) observed upstream and in the rainy season (∼5250 μatm), associated with O2 undersaturation (∼60%) and low δ¹³CDIC, suggest a strongly heterotrophic system, and resulted in high CO2 efflux to the atmosphere. CH4 concentrations were also higher during the rainy than dry season (93.5 ± 62.5 vs. 61.3 ± 39.5 nmol L⁻¹), but unlike pCO2, showed tidal variations similar to TSM and POC, thus alluding to potential CH4 release from sediments during resuspension events at high tidal flow velocities. This explorative survey revealed complex drivers and biogeochemical processes acting upon various spatio-temporal scales which are necessary to consider for a complete understanding of the carbon biogeochemistry in estuarine systems. Similar surveys on estuarine carbon in data scarce regions are encouraged to constrain uncertainties in coastal zone carbon budgets.

Lab head

Gudrun De Boeck
Department
  • Department of Biology
About Gudrun De Boeck
  • Our research group ECOSPHERE (https://www.uantwerpen.be/en/research-groups/ecosphere/) studies aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems that are continuously challenged by natural and anthropogenic stressors. My research focuses on effects of environmental factors (hypoxia, temperature, salinity, heavy metals, stress hormones...) on energy metabolism and iono- and osmoregulation of different marine and freshwater fish and more recently we started using transcriptomics, proteomics and metabolomics.

Members (29)

Jonas Schoelynck
  • University of Antwerp
Stefan Van Damme
  • University of Antwerp
Katrien Van der Biest
  • University of Antwerp
Dirk Vrebos
  • University of Antwerp
Victoria Matey
  • San Diego State University
Maarten De Jonge
  • University of Antwerp
Olivier Gourgue
  • University of Antwerp
Thimo Groffen
  • University of Antwerp
Robby Stoks
Robby Stoks
  • Not confirmed yet
W. Gary Anderson
W. Gary Anderson
  • Not confirmed yet
Raewyn M. Town
Raewyn M. Town
  • Not confirmed yet
Amit Kumar Sinha
Amit Kumar Sinha
  • Not confirmed yet
C.M. Nawata
C.M. Nawata
  • Not confirmed yet
Marion Pillet
Marion Pillet
  • Not confirmed yet
Giovanni Castaldo
Giovanni Castaldo
  • Not confirmed yet
Marjan Diricx
Marjan Diricx
  • Not confirmed yet