Lab

Dr Wael Sadaqa's Lab

Featured research (4)

Endoscopic procedures and stent technology innovations have significantly developed their usage in gastrointestinal illnesses. The use of stents in the GI tract has expanded to encompass a wide range of malignant and benign diseases and anatomical sites. However, whether covered self-expanding stents can help control postoperative small bowel leaks and fistulas is still not answered. Stent's utility in managing bowel leaks and fistulas is rarely reported, and no adequate evidence in the literature concerning its benefits and limitations. A 63-year-old patient had numerous surgeries for recurrent adhesive intestinal obstruction. The patient repeated laparotomies were complicated with multiple minor bowel injuries, high output complex enterocutaneous fistulas, extensive leaks, nutritional depletion, and major wound and skin breakdown. This report describes our approach for deploying covered self-expanding metallic stents (SEMS) in the small bowel to manage high output complex enterocutaneous fistulas in this patient. The clinical benefits and drawbacks of such clinical applications are described, and the problems and difficulties experienced.
Background Resilience has emerged as a concept that could explain and predict good academic and well-being of students in stressful and traumatic situations. This study was conducted to assess resilience and identify predictors of high resilience scores among nursing students in Palestine. Methods This cross-sectional study adhered to the Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology statement. Undergraduate nursing students in all academic years were recruited and asked to complete a questionnaire the contained the trait and state resilience scales. Results In this study, 290 students completed the questionnaire (response rate = 92.4%). The mean combined resilience score was 134.1 (SD: 12.8). Higher combined resilience scores were predicted by being in first academic year (p-value < 0.003), living in Israeli seized areas (p-value < 0.044), absence of chronic diseases (p-value = 0.035), experiencing addiction issues (p-value = 0.031), living in a house with enough number of rooms per siblings (p-value = 0.015), and having a study routine on daily basis (p-value < 0.001). Conclusions Undergraduate nursing students in Palestine reported relatively high trait and state resilience. Higher resilience scores were predicted by favorable living and study conditions. More studies are still needed to investigate the relationship between resilience scores, perceived well-being, willingness to care, and future success of nursing students in Palestine.
Background Resilience has emerged as a concept that could explain and predict good academic and well-being of students in stressful and traumatic situations. This study was conducted to assess resilience and identify predictors of high resilience scores among nursing students in Palestine. Methods This cross-sectional study adhered to the Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology statement. Undergraduate nursing students in all academic years were recruited and asked to complete a questionnaire the contained the trait and state resilience scales. Results In this study, 290 students completed the questionnaire (response rate = 92.4%). The mean combined resilience score was 134.1 (SD: 12.8). Higher combined resilience scores were predicted by being in first academic year (p-value < 0.003), living in Israeli seized areas (p-value < 0.044), absence of chronic diseases (p-value = 0.035), experiencing addiction issues (p-value = 0.031), living in a house with enough number of rooms per siblings (p-value = 0.015), and having a study routine on daily basis (p-value < 0.001). Conclusions Undergraduate nursing students in Palestine reported relatively high trait and state resilience. Higher resilience scores were predicted by favorable living and study conditions. More studies are still needed to investigate the relationship between resilience scores, perceived well-being, willingness to care, and future success of nursing students in Palestine.

Lab head

Dr Wael Sadaqa
Department
  • Anesthesia and Intensive care
About Dr Wael Sadaqa
  • Ass Prof /Anesthesia and Intensive care / Faculty of medicine / An-Najah National University. Head of Anesthesia and SICU department / An-Najah National University Hospital \ Nablus \ Palestine. Member of anesthesia and intensive care high committee /palestinian medical council. Member of pain management subcommittee / WFSA. Member of ICU board committee / Arab board of Anesthesia and Intensive care.

Members (9)

Murat Topbas
  • Karadeniz Technical University
Aidah Alkaissi
  • An-Najah National University
Mahmoud Mustafa
  • An-Najah National University
Khaled Demyati
  • An-Najah National University
Omer Kutlu
  • Anadolu University
Shurouq Ghalib Qadous
  • An-Najah National University
Iyad Maqboul
  • An-Najah National University
Abdelbaset Nazzal
  • An-Najah National University
Umit Cobanoglu
Umit Cobanoglu
  • Not confirmed yet
Huseyin Eren
Huseyin Eren
  • Not confirmed yet
Ersagun Karaguzel
Ersagun Karaguzel
  • Not confirmed yet
Yusuf Onder Ozsagir
Yusuf Onder Ozsagir
  • Not confirmed yet
Abdullah Sivrikaya
Abdullah Sivrikaya
  • Not confirmed yet
Ahmet Onur Yuksel
Ahmet Onur Yuksel
  • Not confirmed yet
Obaida Weld Ali
Obaida Weld Ali
  • Not confirmed yet
Abdelkarim Barqawi
Abdelkarim Barqawi
  • Not confirmed yet