About the lab

Research Group CTS267 "Psicología de la Salud y Medicina Conductual" / "Health Psychology & Behavioural Medicine"

Featured research (53)

Based on the transactional and salutogenic perspectives, we explored individual profiles that integrate psychosocial factors and compositional elements of the built home environment. Adults with different socio-demographic characteristics completed several self-report measures on psychological factors (personality traits, self-efficacy, mental health, and happiness) and architectural elements constituting the ideal home environment. Adopting an individual-centered perspective, three distinct intra-individual psycho-architectural (person-environment) profiles were found with different compositional preferences and psychosocial characteristics in terms of functioning, health, and well-being: endopathic (characterized by higher levels of psychosocial resources and well-being indicating a highly adapted and successful profile, and architectural preferences corresponding to their identities and experiences—expression through spaces), assimilative (characterized by average levels in all regulatory parameters indicating moderately adaptive individuals, and architectural preferences of spaces created in interactive processes—introjection of spaces), and additive individuals (characterized by a comparatively dysfunctional, poorer psychosocial profile, and architectural preferences in line with provoking a restorative effect—change with spaces). An awareness of the psychosocial features of the users for whom the homes are built can help in designing spaces to inhabit that are adapted to them for an enhancement of their overall well-being. Therefore, a better understanding of the interconnections between psychology and architecture will help in designing healthy spaces.
This study explored intraindividual multidimensional profiles integrating psychosocial factors, namely, body image and satisfaction, weight-related self-stigma, positivity, and happiness, and behavioural-lifestyle factors, namely, adherence to a healthy diet, among Spanish adults with overweight or obesity. We further aimed to investigate the association of excess weight (i.e., measured body mass index, BMI) with the abovementioned multidimensional configurations. A convenience sample of 100 adult individuals (60% females) with excessive weight (69% overweight; 31% obesity) was recruited. They completed self-reports regarding the study variables, and their weight and height were measured. With a perspective centered on the individual, a cluster analysis was performed. Three distinct intraindividual psychosocial and diet-related profiles were identified: a group of healthy individuals with excess weight (46%); a group of individuals who were negatively affected by their excessive weight and showed the most distressed profile (18%); and a group of dysfunctional individuals who seemed to be excessively unrealistic and optimistic regarding their excessive weight and unhealthy lifestyles, but were troubled by their weight (36%). Furthermore, individuals in the affected cluster had higher obesity (mean BMI ± SD = 32.1 ± 3.7) than those in the clusters of healthy (28.0 ± 3.0) and dysfunctional individuals (28.1 ± 3.3) (p < 0.05). The results showed that there are specific psychosocial and lifestyle profiles in the adult population with excess weight and that there are relationships among psychological, behavioural, and body-composition factors. For clinical application purposes, it is important to account for the heterogeneity within individuals who are obese and to individualize the interventions, with a focus from weight change to the individual’s overall well-being.
With prevalence of obesity increasing worldwide, understanding body image in individuals with excessive weight is important, as unawareness of weight excess can prevent weight loss attempts. We explored the associations among measured and self-reported body mass index (BMI), body image and body satisfaction among Spanish females and males with overweight or obesity, with a special focus in discriminating individuals who are and are not satisfied with their body and wish or not to change their appearance. Just unifying all individuals with excessive weight may lead to uncover or deny different realities and to develop unfitted clinical management options. Updating findings for the Spanish population, we found that most participants correctly estimated their weight, but 3 in 10 underestimated it. Similarly, their body images corresponded to adults with overweight or obesity who desired to be thinner, but in average they reported a perceived body just slightly overweight and a moderate satisfaction with their body. Complementing the existing evidence, BMI and sex-gender interacted for influencing body weight estimation and desired weight change. In addition, three different subgroups were found for desired change of weight and size, depending on their BMI and body satisfaction. Discovering and considering different subjective realities and corporeal experiences among individuals with weight excess will help professionals to develop appropriate therapeutic interventions. Thus, the personal experiences that individuals have with obesity, instead of obesity itself, should be considered for disentangling management efforts.
We explored possible paths from physical and mental health-related quality of life, self-efficacy, optimism, and social support to happiness in older adults, considering hedonic balance and life satisfaction as mediators. A total of 154 Spanish male and female (50%) older adults (65–96 years old, M = 77.44, SD = 8.03; 64% noninstitutionalized elderly) voluntarily participated in this correlational, cross-sectional study. The participants completed self-reports on their perceived health status, self-efficacy, social support, optimism, and global subjective well-being (SWB) as well as its dimensions. Path analysis was used to examine direct and indirect relationships. The final model had an excellent fit with the data (χ2(10) = 11.837, p = .296, χ2/df = 1.184; SRMR = 0.050, CFI = 0.994, RMSEA = 0.035), revealing the unique causal effects of all the included predictors on happiness. With the exception of self-efficacy, the psychosocial resources predicted older adults’ current happiness, and this relationship was fully mediated by hedonic balance and life satisfaction, which were found to be putative intermediary factors for SWB. Self-efficacy in turn predicted the remaining psychosocial resources. Our findings extend the existing evidence on the influences of health-related quality of life, self-efficacy, optimism, and social support on SWB. Furthermore, they support the proposal of hedonic balance and life satisfaction as dimensions of SWB, thus supporting the tripartite hierarchical model of happiness. These results may inform future interventions seeking to improve happiness in late adulthood.
Although previous evidence suggests that happiness is lower among individuals with obesity, research on the correlates of subjective well-being (SWB) is warranted to increase our knowledge. We aim to explore excess weight (i.e., measured and self-reported body mass index (BMI)), body image and satisfaction, self-stigma, positivity, and happiness among Spanish adults with overweight or obesity. We further aim to investigate the predictors of SWB in this sample. A convenience sample of 100 individuals with excess weight completed self-reports on the study variables and were weighed and their height measured. On average, the participants reported body perceptions revealing minor excessive weight, moderate body satisfaction, low-to-moderate weight-related stigma, and elevated positivity and happiness. BMI and gender/sex independently affected these variables, but there were no significant interaction effects. Furthermore, individuals with overweight or obesity with higher body satisfaction and elevated positivity were more likely to report being happy, independent of their age, gender/sex, weight, and weight-related stigma. Mediation effects were found for body satisfaction and positivity in the relationship between weight and happiness. Moreover, positive orientation suppressed the pervasive influence of stigma on SWB. Our findings confirm the key role of body image dimensions and weight-related stigma for happiness and add support to the relevance of positivity for overall well-being of individuals with excess weight. These results may inform obesity management actions focused on inclusive aesthetic models, combating social stigmatization and enhancing positivity for a flourishing and fulfilling life.

Lab head

Débora Godoy-Izquierdo
Department
  • Department of Personality, Evaluation and Psychological Treatment

Members (10)

Juan Gonzalez Hernandez
  • University of Granada
Juan F Godoy
  • University of Granada
Francisco Araque
  • University of Granada
María J. Ramírez Molina
  • University of Granada
Mercedes Vélez
  • Universidad de Huelva
Raquel Lara Moreno
  • University of Granada
Adelaida Irene Ogallar-Blanco
  • University of Granada
Estefanía Navarrón Vallejo
  • University of Granada
Alejandra Rodríguez-Tadeo
Alejandra Rodríguez-Tadeo
  • Not confirmed yet
Mª Luisa Vázquez
Mª Luisa Vázquez
  • Not confirmed yet
maría luisa vázquez pérez
maría luisa vázquez pérez
  • Not confirmed yet
adelaida irene ogallar blanco
adelaida irene ogallar blanco
  • Not confirmed yet
mercedes vélez toral
mercedes vélez toral
  • Not confirmed yet
manuel jiménez torres
manuel jiménez torres
  • Not confirmed yet
juana garcía garcía
juana garcía garcía
  • Not confirmed yet
mark hurn
mark hurn
  • Not confirmed yet