Lab

AudioLab: York

Featured projects (4)

Project
This research aims to investigate synchronization between singers during vocal ensemble performances. Specifically, the study observes: i) the role of the presence or absence of visual contact between singers on interpersonal synchronization; ii) the effect of the instruction to act as leader or follower on interpersonal synchronization; iii) the leader-follower relationships; iv) the development of synchronization during a first term of study, following a newly formed semi-professional SAATB a cappella ensemble; v) the perceptibility of the effects of altered visual contact and degree of rehearsal on temporal synchronization during singing duo and quintet performances, for listeners with different levels of musical expertise; and, vi) whether the performed asynchronies are connected with the asynchronies that listeners can perceive.
Project
The creation of a numerically and acoustically valid mesh of KEMAR for use within BEM simulaton.

Featured research (2)

Ambisonics has enjoyed a recent resurgence in popularity due to virtual reality applications. Low order Ambisonic reproduction is inherently inaccurate at high frequencies, which causes poor timbre and height localisation. Diffuse-Field Equalisation (DFE), the theory of removing direction-independent frequency response, is applied to binaural (over headphones) Ambisonic rendering to address high-frequency reproduction. DFE of Ambisonics is evaluated by comparing binaural Ambisonic rendering to direct convolution via head-related impulse responses (HRIRs) in three ways: spectral difference, predicted sagittal plane localisation and perceptual listening tests on timbre. Results show DFE successfully improves frequency reproduction of binaural Ambisonic rendering for the majority of sound source locations, as well as the limitations of the technique, and set the basis for further research in the field.
Natural channel separation (NCS) refers to the level of acoustic isolation which exists naturally between the ears for a single sound source. To the authors’ knowledge, no systematic study has been undertaken to identify source positions which can produce the required level of NCS for binaural reproduction to be achieved without using crosstalk cancellation. The transfer functions of 655,214 loudspeaker positions were simulated using the boundary element method and the NCS calculated for each. For loudspeaker positions under 0.5 m from the head there is a clear inverse relationship between NCS and distance. Close to the head, many positions exceed the 20 dB NCS required. Results suggest that near-field binaural reproduction may be implemented without crosstalk cancellation, subject to further perceptual testing.

Lab head

Members (18)

Andy Hunt
  • The University of York
Gavin Kearney
  • The University of York
Helena Daffern
  • The University of York
Tony Tew
  • The University of York
Thomas McKenzie
  • The University of Edinburgh
Sara D'Amario
  • Universität für Musik und darstellende Kunst Wien
Chris Pike
  • The University of York
Michael Lovedee-Turner
  • The University of York
Joe Rees-Jones
Joe Rees-Jones
  • Not confirmed yet
Huan Mi
Huan Mi
  • Not confirmed yet
Hongbo Hu
Hongbo Hu
  • Not confirmed yet

Alumni (9)

David M Howard
  • Royal Holloway, University of London
Alex Southern
  • Aalto University
Aglaia Foteinou
  • University of Wolverhampton
Jeremy Wells
  • The University of York