Zoosystema

Online ISSN: 1638-9387
Publications
-Average and range of base content of variable sites across all available taxa (59 for 28S, 25 for mtDNA genes). Left pair for each base: the 28S rDNA for Megascolecidae and outgroup taxa. Right pair for each base: megascolecid 12S rDNA and 16S rDNA.
-Primers employed. Position numbers are from the Lumbricus terrestris mtDNA (accession number U24570).
-GTR-Γ model parameter estimates for the 25 taxa of Megascolecid 28S, mtDNA, and combined data-sets. Alpha = 0.196/0.295/0.254. 28S to the left, mtDNA middle, and combined data right (T-G rate is normalised to 1). Four discrete rate catego- ries for gamma, empirical base content.
-Semistrict consensus trees for the Megascolecid 28S and mtDNA data-sets; A, consensus of 28S and mtDNA maximum likelihood trees; B, consensus of SUM model reverse constraint tree showing conflict between 28S and mtDNA partitions (see Table 4); C, COMBO model partition conflict consensus.
— Effect of model design on likelihood support surface across reverse constraint trees. Relative lnL of a selection of near parsimonious reverse constraint trees compared to the best: SUM model tree score for the SUM model; the SUM GTR-Γ models with fixed parameters; same but with extra invariant sites parameter; SUM GTR-Γ models with optimized parameters for each topology; COMBO model fixed parameters. Line joining individual ∆lnL values is to aid visualization.  
Article
Analysis of megascolecoid oligochaete (earthworms and allies) nuclear 28S rDNA and mitochondrial 12S and 16S rDNA using parsimony and likelihood, partition support and likelihood ratio tests, indicates that all higher, suprageneric, classifications within the Megascolecidae are incompatible with the molecular data. The two data-sets (nuclear and mitochondrial) may have historical or methodological incompatabilities therefore we explore the effect on measures of support and conflict at three levels: 1) separate analysis; 2) combining the data with single model; and 3) combining the relative support for competing topologies using separate models. Resolving power is identified via partition support, consensus and four competing likelihood ratio tests. Combined analysis identifies hidden support and conflict; more complex models reduce this conflict, possibly owing to removal of dynamic heterogeneity, and give a more resolved consensus. This is incompatible with morphological classifications, rejection of which varies among likelihood ratio tests. Both congruence and combined power support our conclusions: most of the groupings are based on homoplasies, for instance, multiple origin of racemose prostates or of « dichogastrin » meronephridia. The widely used classification of the non-ocnerodrilin Megascolecidae into three groups (Acanthodrilidae, with tubular prostates and holonephridia; Octochaetidae, with tubular prostates and meronephridia; and Megascolecidae, with racemose prostates) is not supported by molecular data. Monophyly of the Crassiclitellata Jamieson, 1988, oligochaetes with a multilayered clitellum, is confirmed. The results provide support for including the branchiobdellids and leeches in the Oligochaeta.
 
Article
Four new skates of the genus Notoraja Ishiyama, 1958 are described from the rarely accessed, deep waters off New Caledonia, Vanuatu and Fiji islands, and the Norfolk Ridge. Three of these (N. alisae n. sp., N longiventralis n. sp. and N fijiensis n. sp.) are "velcro skates" which are characterised by their velvety dorsal and ventral surfaces, covered with fine denticles. Although similar in shape, they differ by their colour pattern, dermal armature, development of the lateral tail folds, and size of the pelvic-fin anterior lobe and nasal curtain. The description of the fourth species, Notoraja inusitata n. sp., is based on a juvenile male exhibiting some unusual features resembling those of other skate genera.
 
Article
Nomenclatural changes in neotropical Arctiinae (Insecta, Lepidoptera, Erebidae); second part.In order to update the neotropical Arctiinae catalogue, 38 synonymies, 52 genus changes, 10 species revalidations and 4 status changes are proposed. A lectotype is designated and the new genus Pseudepimolis n. gen. is described. These modifications are supported by morphological and molecular data.Dans la perspective de l'actualisation de la liste des Arctiinae néotropicales, 38 synonymies, 52 changements de genre, 10 revalidations et 4 changements de statut sont proposés. Un lectotype est désigné et le nouveau genre Pseudepimolis n. gen. est décrit. Ces modifications s'appuient sur des données morphologiques et moléculaires.
 
Article
In the Figure 10 where the Gryllinae (Gryllidae) genera present in New Caledonia are illustrated, the letters of the two species of the genus Lepidogryllus Otte & Alexander, 1983 have been inverted, while they are correctly indicated in the legend and in the text of the paper. The figure is published here with the correct letters: Figure 10C shows L. comparatus (Walker, 1869), largely distributed in the Region, and Figure 10D shows L. darthvaderi Desutter-Grandcolas & Anso, 2016, recently described from the South of Grande Terre, with its distinctive very dark coloration. © Publications scientifiques du Muséum national d'Histoire naturelle, Paris.
 
Article
The Mercuria Boeters, 1971 species living in the coastal zones of France are reviewed. In the Atlantic zone the genus Mercuria comprises four species: M. Anatina (Poiret, 1801), M. Baudoniana (Gassies, 1859), M. Bayonnensis (Locard, 1894) and M. Sarahae (Paladilhe, 1869); in the Mediterranean zone we discriminate three species: M. Meridionalis (Risso, 1826), M. Similis (Draparnaud, 1805), and M. Corsensis n. Sp. Mercuria sarahae is represented by two subspecies, M. S. Sarahae and M. S. Vindilica (Paladilhe, 1870). Mercuria corsensis n. Sp., a close sister species to the Sardinian M. Zopissa (Paulucci, 1882) lives only in the extreme South of Corsica. Amnicola emiliana Paladilhe, 1869, does not belong to the genus Mercuria but must be attributed to Pseudamnicola Paulucci, 1878. Lectotypes for Bythinia [sic] bayonnensis Locard, 1894, Bythinia [sic] baudoniana Gassies, 1859, Amnicola lanceolata Paladilhe, 1869, Amnicola sarahae Paladilhe, 1869, Amnicola vindilica Paladilhe, 1870 and Bithynia meridionalis Risso, 1826 are designated. For Amnicola emiliana a neotype is designated. In addition the systematic position of the genus Mercuria is discussed which results in the introduction of a new monotypic subfamily, Mercuriinae n. Subfam. The new Corsican species M. Corsensis n. Sp. Is with an average heigth of 3.10 mm and a diameter of 2.20 mm slightly larger and more inflated than M. Zopissa, which is reflected by a ratio of height of aperture to total height of c. 52% instead of 42-44%. In M. Corsensis n. Sp. The last whorl before the aperture does neither descend nor ascend, while it clearly descends in M. Zopissa. Further, the identity of the following nominal taxa is discussed: Bithinia [sic] moutonii Dupuy, 1849, Amnicola spirata Paladilhe, 1869, Paludestrina brevispira Paladilhe, 1870, Paludina cerulea Massot, 1872 and Amnicola lutetiana Locard, 1893. Finally, ecological preferences and the endangerment of the species mentioned for France are discussed. © 2017. Publications scientifiques du Muséum national d'Histoire naturelle, Paris.
 
Article
After a summarized list of the great French expeditions around the world in the 19th century and of the naturalists who took part in them, the type specimens of 38 Pteroclididae and Columbidae taxa are reviewed and commented. The Muséum national d'Histoire naturelle, Paris, owns the holotypes by monotypy of the following taxa: Pterocles simplex Roux in Lesson, 1831, Phalacrotreron delalandii Bonaparte, 1854, Vinago calva Verreaux & Verreaux, 1851, Columba leucotis Temminck in Temminck & Laugier, 1823, Columba gularis Quoy & Gaimard, 1830, Kurukuru nebouxii Des Murs & Prévost, 1855, Ptilopus greyi Bonaparte, 1857, Columba dupetithouarsii Néboux, 1840, Ptilinopus mariae Hombron & Jacquinot in Jacquinot & Pucheran, 1853, Ptilopus apicalis Bonaparte, 1854, Ptilopus pictiventris Elliot, 1878, Omeotreron batilda Bonaparte, 1854, Kurukuru mercierii Des Murs & Prévost, 1855, Globicera tarrali Bonaparte, 1854, Globicera pacifica Bonaparte, 1854, Carpophaga griseipectus Gray in Bonaparte, 1854, Columba rufigaster Quoy & Gaimard, 1830, Serresius galeatus Bonaparte, 1855, Columba pinon Quoy & Gaimard, 1824, Columba zoeae Lesson in Dumont, 1826, Ducula pistrinaria Bonaparte, 1854, Carpophaga ochropygia Bonaparte, 1854 as well as syntypes of the following taxa: Sphenurus apicauda laotianus Delacour, 1926, Sphenurus apicauda lowei Delacour & Jabouille, 1924, Columba cyanovirens Lesson & Garnot in Dumont, 1826, Columba roseicapilla Lesson, 1831, Ptilinopus flavicollis Gray in Bonaparte, 1854, Columba luteovirens Hombron & Jacquinot, 1841, Columba nitidissima Scopoli, 1786, Columba pulcherima Scopoli, 1786, Columba puella Lesson, 1827, Columba oceanica Lesson & Garnot in Dumont, 1826, Carpophaga microcera Bonaparte, 1854, Globicera sundevalli Bonaparte, 1854, Columba luctuosa Temminck in Temminck & Laugier, 1825, Globicera rubricera Gray in Bonaparte, 1854, Columba rosacea Temminck in Temminck & Laugier, 1835. A lectotype is designated for Columba virens Lesson, 1831.
 
Article
The types of eight taxa of Columbidae in the Museum national d'Histoire naturelle, Paris are reviewed and commented upon. The MNHN holds three paralectotypes of Ptilinopus flavicollis Bonaparte, 1854, and the holotypes by monotypy of the following taxa: Ptilopus (Rhamphiculus) Marchei Oustalet, 1880, Trerolqma leclancheri Bonaparte, 1855 and Columba radiata Quoy & Gaimard, 1830. In addition, the MNHN holds syntypes of the following taxa: Columba oxyura Temminck, 1823, Carophaga microcera Bonaparte, 1854, Crossophthalmus reichenbachi Bonaparte, 1854 and Chamaepelia godina Bonaparte, 1854.
 
Article
In this catalogue, the types of taxa of Psittacidae in the collections of the Muséum national d'Histoire naturelle, Paris are revised and commented upon. One lectotype is designated for Conurus weddellii Deville, 1851. The Muséum national d'Histoire naturelle also holds the paralectotypes of three taxa, the holotypes by monotypy of 40 taxa and the syntypes of 28 taxa. © Publications Scientifiques du Muséum national d'Histoire naturelle.
 
Article
Paul Philippe Sanguin de Jossigny était un militaire qui commença sa carrière à l'Isle de France (aujourd'hui île Maurice) comme aide de camp du gouverneur et la termina comme capitaine et ingénieur, avant de rentrer à regret à Paris. Sa renommée est fondée uniquement sur son oeuvre de dessinateur pour Philibert Commerson ; après la mort de celui-ci il apporta au futur Muséum d'Histoire naturelle de Paris les collections et les manuscrits du voyageur naturaliste. Parmi ces documents figuraient plus d'un millier de dessins exécutés par Jossigny lui-même ou par Pierre Sonnerat, représentant essentiellement les plantes et les animaux des Mascareignes et de Madagascar que l'on pouvait y observer en 1770. Nous nous intéressons particulièrement aux vingt-deux planches figurant des reptiles, plus précisément des tortues (10), des lézards (8) et des serpents (4), reproduites pour la première fois dans leur ensemble.Paul Philippe Sanguin de Jossigny (1750–1827), artist of Philibert Commerson. The drawings of reptiles from Madagascar, Rodrigues and Seychelles.Paul Philippe Sanguin de Jossigny was a trooper who began his career at the Isle de France (presently Mauritius) as an aide-de-camp to the governor and ended as captain and engineer before returning reluctantly to Paris. His fame is solely based on his work as artist for Philibert Commerson; after the death of the latter, he brought to the upcoming Muséum d'Histoire naturelle de Paris the naturalist traveller's collections and manuscripts. These documents included more than one thousand drawings made by Jossigny himself or by Pierre Sonnerat, mostly depicting the plants and animals that could be observed in 1770 in the Mascarenes and Madagascar. We pay special attention to the twenty-two plates depicting reptiles, precisely tortoises and turtles (10), lizards (8) and snakes (4), the whole here reproduced for the first time.
 
Article
The apparent absence of the medicinal leech Hirudo medicinalis Linnaeus, 1758, in Ireland has been noted for over 150 years. Furthermore, not a single native Irish specimen has been preserved to prove its existence. The status of the Irish medicinal leech has been subject to several retrospective interpretations which need to be put into perspective in view of new thinking and research. The predominant view that this leech was never indigenous to Ireland is based predominantly on the assumption that Ireland was once totally glaciated, and this leech did not naturally colonise the island in the post-glacial period. Recent genetic evidence that the common frog survived in an Irish glacial refugium invites re-examination of some of this argument. Another widely held view is that within historic times, leeches imported into Ireland for medicine established itself in the wild but disappeared in the 19th century. In fact, Hirudo medicinalis was notoriously difficult to transplant (hence its threatened status). In spite of the millions of leeches imported into the British Isles and North America in the 19th century not a single example of an escaped population has been demonstrated. A third interpretation that the medicinal leech was indeed indigenous to Ireland is, in the author's view, most compatible with a re-assessment of the historical and more recent evidence detailed in this paper. The author leaves open as a real biological possibility that the medicinal leech may be rediscovered in Ireland, but points out the historical precedent in mainland Britain that premature proclamation of extinction may delay potential rediscovery by decades.
 
Article
A skull of Procavia capensis (Pallas, 1766) (Hyracoidea, Mammalia), currently on display in the Galerie de Paléontologie et d'Anatomie comparée (Paleontology and comparative Anatomy Gallery) of the Muséum national d'Histoire naturelle, Paris, is here identified as the one Daubenton described in 1767 in the catalog of the viviparous quadruped collections of the King's Cabinet he wrote for Buffon's Histoire naturelle (Natural History). While Daubenton clearly recognized in this skull from Sidon, Lebanon, the most remarkable characters of hyracoids, especially the teeth, he could not identify the animal, since the first precise description of the species was published by Pallas at the same time (at the end of 1766). In subsequent volumes of the Histoire naturelle, Buffon repeatedly dealt with the hyrax, on the basis of new data, but he failed to assign the skull of Sidon to this species, although Pallas recognized the nature of this skull as early as 1776. In a volume of the Histoire naturelle published in 1789, after Buffon's death, this skull was illustrated on a plate and considered as belonging to a primate, the Bengal slow loris (Nycticebus bengalensis (Lacépède, 1800)). Fifteen years later, it was one of the specimens which enabled Cuvier to remove the hyrax from the order Glires or Rodents, in which it was generally placed since Pallas, to assign it to the Pachydermes. © Publications scientifiques du Muséum national d'Histoire naturelle, Paris.
 
Article
Augosoma centaurus Fabricius, 1775 (Melolonthidae: Dynastinae), one of the largest Scarabaeoid beetles of the Ethiopian Region, is classified in the tribe Dynastini MacLeay, 1819, principally on the basis of morphological characters of the male: large frontal and pronotal horns, and enlargement of fore legs. With the exception of A. centaurus, the 62 species of this tribe belong to ten genera grouped in Oriental plus Australasian and Neotropical regions. We performed cytogenetic studies of A. centaurus and several Asian and Neotropical species of Dynastini, in addition to species belonging to other sub-families of Melolonthidae Leach, 1819 and various tribes of Dynastinae MacLeay, 1819: Oryctini Mulsant, 1842, Phileurini Burmeister, 1842, Pentodontini Mulsant, 1842 and Cyclocephalini Laporte de Castelnau, 1840. The karyotypes of most species were fairly alike, composed of 20 chromosomes, including 18 meta- or sub-metacentric autosomes, one acrocentric or sub-metacentric X-chromosome, and one punctiform Y-chromosome, as that of their presumed common ancestor. Among the Dynastinae we studied, the karyotypes of the two species of Oryctes Illiger, 1798 and A. centaurus deeply differ from others: they look alike and are composed of 18 chromosomes only, many acrocentric autosomes and neo-sex chromosomes resulting from an X-Y-autosome translocation. The reassessment of their morphologies, in particular of female specimens, exhibits many shared characters. The genetic proximity of Augosoma and Oryctes is confirmed by the comparison of DNA sequence data separately found in the literature. Thus, the genera Augosoma and Oryctes should be grouped together, and not split into two different tribes. These results challenge the separation of the tribes Dynastini and Oryctini and the traditional use male exaggerated characters for establishing a systematic classification.
 
-Schematic representation of the antennular segmentation in the females of Cyclops O. F. Müller, 1776. Asterisks mark the aesthetascs on the ancestral XXI segment. Proximal is left.
— Interspecific variability of the aesthetasc on the ancestral XXI antennular segment, female; A, Cyclops singularis Einsle, 1996 (Germany, paratype); B, C, C. heberti Einsle, 1996; B, Poland, Wigry (Cyclops strenuus strenuus Fischer, 1851 sensu Koźmiński, 1933); C, Germany (paratype); D, C. insignis Claus, 1857 (Norway, Frognertjern); E, C. alaskaensis Lindberg, 1956 (Alaska); F, C. canadensis Einsle, 1988 (Alaska, Point Barrow); G, C. scutifer Sars, 1863 (Norway, Lønavatn). Scale bar: 50 µm.  
— Spinule ornamentation on the caudal surface of the antennal coxobasis, female; A, B, Cyclops singularis Einsle, 1996; A, Hungary, Tiszavasvári; B, Germany (paratype); C, D, C. alaskaensis Lindberg, 1956 (Alaska); E, F, C. kolensis Lilljeborg, 1901 (Poland, L. Wigry); G, H, C. canadensis Einsle, 1988 (Alaska, Point Barrow). Scale bars: 50 µm.  
— Ornamentation of the maxillular palp, and setulation of the palp setae, female; A, Cyclops strenuus Fischer, 1851 (Russia, Peterhof); B, C, C. canadensis Einsle, 1988; B, Alaska, Point Barrow; C, Alaska, Chatanika; D, C. abyssorum Sars, 1863 (Norway, Lønavatn); E, C. furcifer Claus, 1857 (Germany, Baden); F, C. singularis Einsle, 1996 (Germany, paratype). Scale bars: 50 µm.  
— Setulation of the medial spine and ornamentation of the frontal surface of P1 basipodite, female; A, Cyclops abyssorum Sars, 1863 (Norway, Lønavatn); B, C. kolensis Lilljeborg, 1901 (Poland, L. Wigry); C, C. furcifer Claus, 1857 (Germany, Baden); D, C. alaskaensis Lindberg, 1956 (Alaska). Scale bar: 50 µm.  
Article
The morphology of the cephalothoracic appendages is compared among 12 taxa of Cyclops O. F. Müller, 1776: C. strenuus strenuus Fischer, 1851, C. strenuus landei Koźmiński, 1933, C. abyssorum Sars, 1863, C. furcifer Claus, 1857, C. heberti Einsle, 1996, C. singularis Einsle, 1996, C. scutifer Sars, 1863, C. kolensis Lilljeborg, 1901, C. insignis Claus, 1857, C. canadensis Einsle, 1988, C. columbianus Lindberg, 1956, and C. alaskaensis Lindberg, 1956. Diagnostic microcharacters found to be new or rarely mentioned in the earlier descriptions are: the relative length of the aesthetascs on the ancestral XXI antennular segment; the spinule ornamentation on the caudal surface of the antennal coxobasis; spinule ornamentation of the maxillular palp, and setulation of the maxillular palp setae; spinule ornamentation on the frontal surface of the maxilliped syncoxopodite; setulation of the medial spine and spinule ornamentation on the frontal surface of leg 1 basipodite. Hypothetical roles of the elongate aesthetascs on the ancestral XXI antennular segment in the pelagic Cyclops species, and long pinnate setae on the maxillular palp are discussed. C. strenuus landei is synonymized with C. strenuus strenuus, and C. strenuus strenuus sensu Koźmiński, 1933 is found to be conspecific with C. heberti. Refined morphological delimitation of the taxa resulted in obtaining new data on the geographical distribution of C. heberti (southern France, central Italy, northern Germany and Poland) and C. singularis (Hungary and Slovakia). Nearctic occurence of C. strenuus has not been confirmed.
 
Article
A new species of monogenean Protoancylodiscoides katii n. sp., recovered from the gills of Malapterurus electricus (Gmelin, 1789) (Siluriforme, Malapteruridae) from Ivory Coast, is described. This species can be distinguished from other species of the genus by the size of sclerotised part of the haptor: dorsal gripus, dorsal and ventral bar, uncinuli I and IV and the structure of the accessory piece of the genitalia.
 
Article
A preliminary investigation of the genus Eucereon Hübner, [1819] has revealed that two of its species have been historically misidentified, one of them being its type species, E. archias (Stoll, 1790). The neotype designated by Travassos (1959) for this species is invalidated, and its original concept is reestablished based on the original description and illustrations. The original concept of Eucereon punctatum (Guérin- Méneville, [1844]) is also found to be different than that established in the literature. This discovery is based on a type specimen found at the Natural History Museum, London. Eucereon punctatum is the valid name of Theages quadricolor Walker, 1855, n. syn., E. quadricolor boreale Rothschild, 1912 n. syn and E. quadricolor meridionale Rothschild, 1912 n. syn. The authors' concept of E. punctatum is henceforth to be referred to by its oldest incorrect synonym, Eucereon mitigatum Walker rev. stat. Following the synonymic history for this species, this name here is considered to be the valid name for E. reticulatum Butler, 1877 n. syn., E. cribrum Möschler, 1877 n. syn., and E. ruficollis Lathy, 1899 n. syn. The true concepts of E. archias, E. punctatum, and E. mitigatum are redescribed, discussed and illustrated. © Publications scientifiques du Muséum national d'Histoire naturelle, Paris.
 
Article
During two cruises to Vanuatu, MUSORSTOM 8 (September–October 1994) and SANTO 2006 (September–October 2006), numerous specimens of deep-sea galatheids belonging to the genus Galathea Fabricius, 1793 were collected. The specimens were caught at stations at depths between 180 and 702 m. These collections contain five new species (G. barbellata n. sp., G. echinata n. sp., G. profunda n. sp., G. raventosae n. sp. and G. sanctae n. sp.), all of which are also found in other collections obtained by French cruises to New Caledonia. Galathea barbellata n. sp., G. echinata n. sp. and G. profunda n. sp. are closely related to G. robusta Baba, 1990, from Madagascar, G. raventosae n. sp. resembles G. consobrina De Man, 1902, from Indonesia, the Philippines, South China Sea and SW Australia, and G. sanctae n. sp. is very close to G. multilineata Balss, 1913, from Japan, East China Sea, Taiwan and the Philippines.
 
-Simplified map of northern India showing localities mentioned in the text. Thanks to Roger Bour, Paris.
Article
Alfred Duvaucel, stepson of Georges Cuvier, collected animals for the Muséum d'Histoire naturelle de Paris, France, during visits to India and South-East Asia from 1817 to 1824. In early 1823, he set out from Chandernagor traveling upstream on the Ganges, intending to reach Nepal or Tibet. During a short stop near Sakrigali in the Rajmahal Hills of Bihar, he was attacked by a rhinoceros and badly hurt on 24 January 1823. After receiving medical treatment in Bhagalpur, he reconsidered his plans and returned to Calcutta. He succumbed to his wounds aggravated by attacks of dysentery on his homeward journey, in Madras in August 1824. His letters written in the Rajmahal Hills were published by Jean-Jacques Coulmann in 1862. The zoological material collected was reviewed by his uncle Frédéric Cuvier, who inserted many details in the Histoire naturelle des mammifères, to which he added biographical notices. The presence of rhinoceros in the Rajmahal Hills (until about 1850) is often recorded, but the specific identity of these animals is uncertain in the absence of any surviving specimens. A mounted rhinoceros in the Zoological Museum of Strasbourg was said to be the one which killed Duvaucel, but as it is a two-horned Sumatran rhinoceros, unknown anywhere near Bihar, this needs further investigation.
 
Article
Three species of the neogastropod genus Columbella Lamarck, 1799 are recognised from the northeastern Atlantic and the Mediterranean. One is the common Mediterranean C. Rustica (Linnaeus, 1758), with paucispiral protoconch, extending its range in the Atlantic South to Senegal and North to Portugal. Columbella adansoni Menke, 1853, with multispiral protoconch is restricted to the Macaronesian archipelagoes. A third species, also with multispiral protoconch, from West Africa is recognised through molecular methods, and the name C. Xiphitella Duclos, 1840 is employed by correcting the original erroneous locality ("Californie") to Gabon. Except for protoconch features, no major morphological characters are available to separate the three species; however diagnostic species-level differences in specific positions in the cytochrome c oxidase I (COI) sequences are present between all three species. © 2017. Publications scientifiques du Muséum national d'Histoire naturelle, Paris.
 
Article
A reappraisal of the taxonomy of the brachyuran crabs belonging to the family Goneplacidae MacLeay, 1838 sensu lato has resulted in the revision of the subfamily Goneplacinae, which combines the subfamilies Goneplacinae MacLeay, 1838 and Carcinoplacinae H. Milne Edwards, 1852. Most of the 66 species of Goneplacinae sensu stricto that are listed herein inhabit relatively deep water and are infrequently collected. The subfamily Goneplacinae sensu stricto now consists of 17 genera of which 10 are being described as new: Carcinoplax H. Milne Edwards, 1852, with 18 species of which four are new; Entricoplax n. gen., monotypic; Exopheticus n. gen., with two species; Goneplacoides n. gen., monotypic; Goneplax Leach, 1814, with four species; Hadroplax n. gen., monotypic; Menoplax n. gen., monotypic; Microgoneplax n. gen., with five species of which four are new; Neogoneplax n. gen., with three species of which two are new; Neommatocarcinus Takeda & Miyake, 1969, monotypic; Notonyx A. Milne-Edwards, 1873, with three species; Ommatocarcinus White, 1852, with four species; Paragoneplax n. gen., monotypic; Psopheticus Wood-Mason, 1892, with four species; Pycnoplax n. gen., with five species of which one is new; Singhaplax Serene & Soh, 1976, with seven species of which four are new; and Thyraplax n. gen., with five species of which three are new. All goneplacine genera are exclusive to the Indo-West Pacific region (plus contiguous temperate areas) except Goneplax, which is so far known mostly from the Atlantic and Mediterranean regions. Four nominal species described by other authors were found to be junior subjective synonyms for other species: Carcinoplax verdensis Rathbun, 1914 and C polita Guinot, 1989 synonymous of C specularis Rathbun, 1914; Goneplax megalops Komatsu & Takeda, 2003 of Goneplacoides marivenae (Komatsu & Takeda, 2003) n. comb.; and Psopheticus insolitus Guinot, 1990 of P stridulans Wood-Mason, 1892.
 
Article
RÉSUMÉ 1802 : le tout jeune Muséum devient éditeur scientifique et publie les premières Annales. 2018 : presque 220 ans plus tard, les périodiques du Muséum sont publiés en flux continu, disponibles en accès libre diamant et au format XML. Cette modernisation technologique opérée par l'équipe des Publications scientifiques s'est étalée sur 20 ans. En 1997, les Bulletins du Muséum national d'Histoire naturelle changent de forme et prennent les noms des périodiques que nous connaissons aujourd'hui. La Section A, Zoologie, biologie et écologie animales devient Zoosystema ; la Section B, Adansonia : Botanique, Phytochimie devient plus simplement Adansonia ; enfin, la Section C, Sciences de la Terre, paléontologie, géologie, minéralogie devient Geodiversitas. La revue Anthropozoologica, quant à elle, rejoint les rangs des journaux scientifiques du Muséum en 2004, pour ses vingt années d'existence. Elle est suivie par l'European Journal of Taxonomy (EJT), lancée en 2011, qui jouera un rôle d'incubateur pour la mise en place de nouvelles technologies pour les revues du Muséum. Dès 1997, celles-ci entrent de plain-pied dans l'ère des revues scientifiques internationales. Car au-delà d'un simple changement de format, c'est leur mode de fonctionnement dans son intégralité qui vit une véritable révolution : alors que les Bulletins étaient gérés par l'assemblée des professeurs du Muséum, le processus d'acceptation des nouveaux périodiques s'appuie désormais sur une évaluation par les pairs, et chaque revue, gérée par un rédacteur en chef, est cautionnée par un comité scientifique composé d'experts internationaux reconnus. Alors que les Bulletins héritaient d'une longue tradition académique, les nouveaux journaux se dotent de titres courts, favorisant la citabilité des articles d'une part, le bon référencement de la revue sur internet et par le Journal Citation Report d'autre part, ainsi que d'une maquette commune. La parution régulière des articles — les derniers vendredis de chaque trimestre — sur papier et sur internet à partir de 2000, et l'ouverture des revues aux articles en langue anglaise finissent de les professionnaliser aux yeux de la communauté scientifique internationale. L'indexation par le Journal Citation Report et l'obtention d'un facteur d'impact pour Geodiversitas, Adansonia et Zoosystema d'abord, puis pour Anthropozoologica et, enfin pour le tout jeune EJT, consacreront ces efforts. L'élargissement régulier de la distribution des revues du Muséum ces vingt dernières années, via les échanges de la Bibliothèque centrale au départ, puis via le site des Publications scientifiques (en 1999, 2004 et 2015 pour la version actuelle) et le portail BioOne (en 2009), s'est aussi révélé une stratégie gagnante. Les articles publiés dans les revues du Muséum sont désormais distribués dans plus de 2 500 universités, et accessibles en ligne, gratuitement et librement, sur le site internet des Publications scientifiques. Les revues scientifiques du Muséum doivent accroître encore leur rayonnement et maintenir leur haute qualité technique et scientifique. Le passage à un flux de publication continu répond à une demande accrue de réactivité de la part des chercheurs. La conversion des articles au format XML permet, à la fois, l'archivage pérenne des articles et le renseignement des grandes bases de données de la recherche. La distribution des articles, d'un côté via le site des Publications scientifiques et de l'autre, via BioOne, ainsi que l'intégration des anciens numéros dans la Biodiversity Heritage Library permettront aux résultats scientifiques originaux confiés aux revues du Muséum de perdurer encore pendant des décennies.
 
Article
Two species of Eucocconotini Beier, 1960 were collected during the “Our Planet Revisited, Mitaraka 2015” survey in the Mitaraka Mountains belonging to Tumuc-Humac mountain chain in French Guiana: Gnathoclita vorax (Stoll, 1813) and Panoploscelis scudderi Beier, 1950. Calling songs of both species are described for the first time, as well as the mandibular and tegminal protest signals from P. scudderi males and females. The structures involved in these signals are described and illustrated. The peculiar acoustic and mate guarding behaviors of Gnathoclita vorax are described and illustrated. The synonymy of Panoploscelis scudderiBeier, 1950 and Panoploscelis angusticauda Beier 1950 n. syn. is discussed and proposed, based on specimens reared from samples collected in Mitaraka.
 
Article
Ten new species of Muricidae Rafinesque, 1815 are described from material collected during expeditions in Madagascar. Five species are described from the Extreme South: Vokesimurex rectaspira n. sp., Timbellus goniodes n. sp., Flexopteron akainakares n. sp., Murexsul mananteninaensis n. sp. and Typhinellus constrictus n. sp.; four from the Northwest: Vokesimurex aliquantulus n. sp., Timbellus pannuceus n. sp., Typhinellus laminatus n. sp. and Siphonochelus (Siphonochelus) aethomorpha n. sp.; and a single species, Bouchetia wareni n. sp., is described from both the Extreme South and the Northwest and is also reported from Mayotte. Similar species from Madagascar, Mozambique and from other regions of the Indo-West Pacific are compared. The radulae of Vokesimurex rectaspira n. sp., Flexopteron akainakares n. sp., Flexopteron primanova (Houart, 1985) and Bouchetia vaubanensis Houart, 1986 are illustrated.Nouvelles espèces de Muricidae Rafinesque, 1815 (Mollusca: Gastropoda) de l'océan Indien occidental.Dix nouvelles espèces de Muricidae Rafinesque, 1815 sont décrites à partir de matériel récolté au cours d'expéditions menées à Madagascar. Cinq espèces sont décrites de l'extrême-sud : Vokesimurex rectaspira n. sp., Timbellus goniodes n. sp., Flexopteron akainakares n. sp., Murexsul mananteninaensis n. sp. et Typhinellus constrictus n. sp. ; quatre sont décrites du nord-ouest de Madagascar : Vokesimurex aliquantulus n. sp., Timbellus pannuceus n. sp., Typhinellus laminatus n. sp. et Siphonochelus (Siphonochelus) aethomorpha n. sp. ; et une seule espèce, Bouchetia wareni n. sp., est décrite à la fois de l'extrême-sud et du nord-ouest et est aussi signalée à Mayotte. Des espèces similaires de Madagascar, du Mozambique et d'autres régions de l'Indo-Ouest Pacifique, sont comparées. Les radulas de Vokesimurex rectaspira n. sp., Flexopteron akainakares n. sp., Flexopteron primanova (Houart, 1985) et de Bouchetia vaubanensis Houart, 1986 sont illustrées.
 
Article
A catalogue of the subtribes Phaegopterina Kirby, 1892 (151 genera, 1720 species, 97 subspecies and 252 synonyms), Arctiina Leach, [1815] (7 genera, 89 species, 3 subspecies and 26 synonyms), Spilosomina Seitz, 1910 (23 genera, 244 species, 22 subspecies and 71 synonyms), Callimorphina Walker, [1865] (1 genus, 6 species, 1 subspecies and 12 synonyms) and Pericopina Walker, [1865] (38 genera, 360 species, 30 subspecies and 126 synonyms) of the Neotropical Region (from Mexico to the southern end of South America) is presented. Under each species name, data on the type specimen, type locality and the acronym of the institution where the type specimen is deposited are provided. Forty-three not available infrasubspecific names and 32 not available manuscript names are also listed. The bibliographical references of all the original descriptions are provided. Lectotypes are designated for the following 51 taxa: Idalus fasciipuncta (Rothschild, 1909); Idalus bicolorella (Strand, 1919); Aphyle affinis Rothschild, 1909; Zatrephes rufescens Rothschild, 1909; Zatrephes subflavescens Rothschild, 1909; Symphlebia fulminans (Rothschild, 1910); Symphlebia hyalina (Rothschild, 1909); Amaxia pulchra Rothschild, 1909; Araeomolis persimilis Rothschild, 1909; Eriostepta fulvescens Rothschild, 1909; Hyponerita similis Rothschild, 1909; Hyponerita persimilis Rothschild, 1909; Coiffaitarctia ockendeni (Rothschild, 1909); Trichromia polyxenoides (Rothschild, 1909); Trichromia sithnides lavendulae (Rothschild, 1909); Trichromia postrosea (Rothschild, 1917); Trichromia inequalis (Rothschild, 1909); Trichromia triangularis (Rothschild, 1909); Trichromia persimilis (Rothschild, 1909); Rhipha subflammans (Rothschild, 1909); Ormetica luteola (Rothschild, 1909); Ernassa cruenta (Rothschild, 1909); Cresera affinis (Rothschild, 1909b); Melese drucei Rothschild, 1909; Melese nigromaciclata Rothschild, 1909; Pachydota drucei Rothschild, 1909; Pachydota punctata Rothschild, 1909; Baritius eleutheroides Rothschild, 1909; Baritius grandis Rothschild, 1909; Pelochyta brunnescens Rothschild, 1909; Elysius conjunctus Rothschild, 1910; Amastus flavicauda Rothschild, 1909; Amastus affinis Rothschild, 1909; Amastus muscosa (Rothschild, 1909); Amastus mossi (Rothschild, 1922); Turuptiana affinis Rothschild, 1909; Lophocampa subvitreata (Rothschild, 1922); Lophocampa meridionalis obsolescens (Rothschild, 1910); Lophocampa major (Rothschild, 1910); Lophocampa walkeri (Rothschild, 1910); Lophocampa aenone (Butler, 1878); Lophocampa maroniensis buchwaldi (Rothschild, 1910); Lophocampa sobrinoides (Rothschild, 1910); Leucanopsis liparoides (Rothschild, 1909); Leucanopsis nonagrioides (Rothschild, 1910); Leucanopsis pseudomanda (Rothschild, 1910); Leucanopsis stipulata (Rothschild, 1909); Leucanopsis subnebulosa (Strand, 1919); Leucanopsis nebulosa (Rothschild, 1909); Leucanopsis luridioides (Rothschild, 1917); Leucanopsis falacroides (Rothschild, 1909). All these lectotypes are housed in BMNH. The type species of each valid genus in the subtribes Phaegopterina, Arctiina, Spilosomina and Callimorphina are illustrated with their type specimens, when available; otherwise, a non type specimen of the type species is figured.Catalogue des Arctiini Leach, [1815] néotropicaux (hors Ctenuchina Kirby, 1837 et Euchromiina Butler, 1876) (Insecta, Lepidoptera, Erebidae, Arctiinae). Un catalogue des sous tribus Phaegopterina Kirby, 1892 (151 genres, 1720 espèces, 97 sous-espèces et 252 synonymes), Arctiina Leach, [1815] (7 genres, 89 espèces, 3 sous-espèces et 26 synonymes), Spilosomina Seitz, 1910 (23 genres, 244 espèces, 22 sous-espèces et 71 synonymes), Callimorphina Walker, [1865] (1 genre, 6 espèces, 1 sous-espèce et 12 synonymes) and Pericopina Walker, [1865] (38 genres, 360 espèces, 30 sous-espèces et 126 synonymes) de la région néotropicale (du Mexique au sud de l'Amérique du Sud) est présenté. Pour chaque nom d'espèce, des données sur le spécimen type, la localité type et l'acronyme de l'institution où le specimen type est déposé, sont fournies. Quarante-trois noms infra-subspécifiques non disponibles et 32 noms manuscrits non disponibles sont également considérés. Les références bibliographiques de toutes les descriptions originales sont fournies. Un lectotype est désigné pour les 51 taxons suivants : Idalus fasciipuncta (Rothschild, 1909) ; Idalus bicolorella (Strand, 1919) ; Aphyle affinis Rothschild, 1909 ; Zatrephes rufescens Rothschild, 1909; Zatrephes subflavescens Rothschild, 1909 ; Symphlebia fulminans (Rothschild, 1910) ; Symphlebia hyalina (Rothschild, 1909) ; Amaxia pulchra Rothschild, 1909 ; Araeomolis persimilis Rothschild, 1909 ; Eriostepta fulvescens Rothschild, 1909 ; Hyponerita similis Rothschild, 1909 ; Hyponerita persimilis Rothschild, 1909 ; Coiffaitarctia ockendeni (Rothschild, 1909) ; Trichromia polyxenoides (Rothschild, 1909) ; Trichromia sithnides lavendulae (Rothschild, 1909) ; Trichromia postrosea (Rothschild, 1917) ; Trichromia inequalis (Rothschild, 1909) ; Trichromia triangularis (Rothschild, 1909) ; Trichromia persimilis (Rothschild, 1909) ; Rhipha subflammans (Rothschild, 1909) ; Ormetica luteola (Rothschild, 1909) ; Ernassa cruenta (Rothschild, 1909) ; Cresera affinis (Rothschild, 1909) ; Melese drucei Rothschild, 1909 ; Melese nigromaculata Rothschild, 1909 ; Pachydota drucei Rothschild, 1909 ; Pachydota punctata Rothschild, 1909 ; Baritius eleutheroides Rothschild, 1909 ; Baritius grandis Rothschild, 1909 ; Pelochyta brunnescens Rothschild, 1909 ; Elysius conjunctus Rothschild, 1910 ; Amastus flavicauda Rothschild, 1909 ; Amastus affinis Rothschild, 1909 ; Amastus muscosa (Rothschild, 1909) ; Amastus mossi (Rothschild, 1922) ; Turuptiana affinis Rothschild, 1909 ; Lophocampa subvitreata (Rothschild, 1922) ; Lophocampa meridionalis obsolescens (Rothschild, 1910) ; Lophocampa major (Rothschild, 1910) ; Lophocampa walkeri (Rothschild, 1910) ; Lophocampa aenone (Butler, 1878) ; Lophocampa maroniensis buchwaldi (Rothschild, 1910) ; Lophocampa sobrinoides (Rothschild, 1910) ; Leucanopsis liparoides (Rothschild, 1909) ; Leucanopsis nonagrioides (Rothschild, 1910) ; Leucanopsis pseudomanda (Rothschild, 1910) ; Leucanopsis stipulata (Rothschild, 1909) ; Leucanopsis subnebulosa (Strand, 1919) ; Leucanopsis nebulosa (Rothschild, 1909) ; Leucanopsis luridioides (Rothschild, 1917) ; Leucanopsis falacroides (Rothschild, 1909). Tous ces lectotypes sont conservés au BMNH. L'espèce type de chaque genre valide des sous tribus Phaegopterina, Arctiina, Spilosomina et Callimorphina est illustrée par un spécimen type, si ce dernier a été localisé. À défaut, un spécimen non typique de l'espèce type est figuré.
 
Article
ABSTRACT Hornera Lamouroux, 1821, a genus which includes large, rigidly erect, ramified and highly calcified cancellate cyclostome species, is represented in the Mediterranean Sea by two species, H. frondiculata (Lamarck, 1816), the type species of the genus, and a species previously left unnamed or wrongly attributed to the northern H. lichenoides (Linnæus, 1758), and classified under this name as threatened in the Mediterranean (Barcelona Convention, Annex II). On the basis of abundant material including large, well-preserved colonies collected by diving, the distinctive morphological and ecological features of these two species are detailed, leading to the description of a new species, H. mediterranea n. sp., and to a better characterization of H. frondiculata. The current state of knowledge of the range of the two Hornera species suggests that they are endemic to the Mediterranean. Their depth and habitat distributions span from 30 to 100 m on both dimly lit rocky walls and flat bottoms with coarse elements for H. frondiculata, and from 55 to 200 m only on flat sandy bottoms for H. mediterranea n. sp., but both species can coexist in the same microhabitat. The distribution of H. frondiculata in two separate habitats is reflected in a remarkable plasticity of colony shape and branching design which optimizes food particle capture according to local flow conditions. https://doi.org/10.5252/zoosystema2020v42a27. http://zoosystema.com/42/27
 
-Callopistria Hübner, 1821 habitus : A, B, C. longipilosa n. sp., Guyane, mâle (A), femelle (B) ; C, C. leucotoma (Druce, 1908) mâle (Guyane). Échelle : 10 mm.
-Callopistria Hübner, 1821 genitalia : A, C. longipilosa n. sp., armature génitale mâle languette du sacullus (1), bras coudé du sacullus (2) ; B, Callopistria longipilosa n. sp., édéage male ; C, C. leucotoma (Druce, 1908) armature génitale mâle, languette du sacullus (1), bras coudé du sacullus (2) ; D, C. leucotoma édéage ; E, C. longipilosa n. sp., genitalia femelle ; F, C. longipilosa n. sp., segment 7 et 8 mâle ; G, C. leucotoma, segment 7 et 8 mâle. Échelle : 10 mm.
Article
Une nouvelle espèce du genre Callopistria Hübner, 1821, C. longipilosa n. sp., est décrite sur une série de cinq spécimens de Guyane. Elle est comparée à C. leucotoma (Druce, 1908) décrite du Pérou mais également présente en Guyane. L'habitus et les genitalia sont illustrés. Deux nouvelles combinaisons et deux nouvelles synonymies sont proposées: Phuphena plinthobaps (Zerny, 1916) n. comb., Elaphria carmioli (Schaus, 1911) n. comb., Callopistria orses (Schaus, 1914) mis en synonymie avec C. panamensisDruce, 1889, et Callopistria trinidensis (Hampson, 1908) mis en synonymie avec C. floridensis (Guenée, 1852).
 
-A-I, photographs of the median areas of the interambulacra, showing the variation in characters that occur: A, Diadema antillarum; B, D. mexicanum; C, D, D. savignyi; E, D. setosum; F, Echinothrix calamaris (brown colour morph); G, E. calamaris (white colour morph); H, E. diadema; I, D. palmeri; J, D. palmeri (whole specimen). Scale bars: A-I, 5 mm; J, 50 mm. 
-MDS plots of taxonomic similarity based on 28 test characters. 
-Cluster analysis based on 28 test characters (zero Euclidean distance = greatest similarity). Abbreviations: b, brown colour morph; w, white colour morph. 
-Test measurements, proportions and features for Echinothrix calamaris (Pallas, 1774). Abbreviations: na, not applicable; SD, standard deviation.
Article
Test morphologies were examined for both living and denuded specimens of all established species of Diadema Gray, 1825 and Echinothrix Peters, 1853, including two colour morphs of Echinothrix calamaris (Pallas, 1774). Twenty-eight morphological characters were measured and analysed using ordination by multi-dimensional scaling (MDS) and cluster analysis. Specific test features were found which differentiated the species. Of these the apical systems, markings on the genital plates, features of the median areas of the interambulacra and distribution of iridophores were particularly useful forms of taxa distinction. Well defined associations in test morphologies were found between Diadema antillarum Philippi, 1845, D. ascensionis Mortensen, 1909, D. mexicanum A. Agassiz, 1863, D. savignyi Michelin, 1845 and D. paucispinum A. Agassiz, 1863. Diadema setosum (Leske, 1778) and particularly D. palmeri Baker, 1967 appeared to be outlying species within the genus; D. palmeri being the only species within the genus Diadema to have a monocyclic apical system. Test morphologies of Echinothrix diadema (Linnaeus, 1758) and E. calamaris were distinctly different, with marked differences in test size and shape, plate arrangements, features of the apical system and structures of the median areas of the interambulacra. The different colour morphs of E. calamaris demonstrated similar test features; however, differences were found which suggest that the brown colour morph may be a separate species or subspecies. © Publications Scientifiques du Muséum national d'Histoire naturelle.
 
Article
The Planches de Seba were published in 48 issues (livraisons) between 1827 and 1831 under the direction of Guérin-Méneville. Livraison 13 contains two sheets (eight pages) of text dealing with plates 1 to 48 of volume 3 of Seba's Locupletissimi rerum naturalium Thesauri (1759). Plates 23 through 34 depict fishes. No types are known for these specimens. Examination of the text published in the Planches de Seba reveals the presence of 94 specific names of fishes. The present status of each of them is reported. In particular, we found that 16 binomina represent original combinations and all but one (Anampses moniliger) have never been recorded in the ichthyological literature, with Planches de Seba as reference, Except for one name (Amphiprion albiventris), which is completely unknown in the literature, all other names bear the date of the original description of well established fish names, Based on the current status of these names, the predated names found in the Planches de Seba are here regarded either as junior synonyms (Agonus europaeus, Amphisilia velitaris, Chaetodon sebanus, Diagramma lineatum, D. pica, D. poecilopterum, Holocentrus orientale, Mesoprion annular is, Pomacanthus cingulatus, Premnas trifasciatus, P. unicolor and Serranus taeniops) or senior synonyms (Chaetodon sebae and Caranx fallax) of well known fish species. For these two latter names, in accordance with the International Code of Zoological Nomenclature, an action was undertaken to set aside the automatic application of Principle of Priority to allow prevailing usage of the current names to be maintained. © Publications Scientifique» du Muséum national d'Histoire naturelle.
 
Article
Article 23.9 of the Code, introduced in its last 1999 version, allows the validation, in some cases, of a well known junior synonym or homonym as opposed to a senior synonym or homonym that had been ignored in the literature after 1899. In such cases, the junior nomen qualifies as a nomen protectum and the senior one as a nomen oblitum, a formula redefined in a new sense in this edition. The implementation of this Article requires one to follow strictly several conditions: the invalidation can concern only senior synonyms or homonyms (a junior one cannot be a nomen oblitum); it must have been published in the sense given to this term in the Code (i.e., it cannot have been proposed online in an unpublished electronic document); and evidence must be published that the junior synonym or homonym has been used as valid for the same taxon in at least 25 works published by at least 10 authors in the immediately preceding 50 years and encompassing a span of not less than 10 years. A nomen oblitum remains an available nomen and can be revalidated subsequently, for example in the case of re-evaluation of a subjective synonymy. Since the implementation of this new Article, some authors have used it without respecting these conditions or some of them: in such cases, the nomenclatural act supposed to have been effected under Article 23.9 is null and void, and the regular Rules of the Code must be applied (e.g., through validation of the senior synonym or homonym). A few examples concerning amphibian nomina of the family Hylidae illustrate these statements. The statuses of the nomina, spellings, emendations and combinations Hyla fulva, Hyla gaimardi, Hyla lesueurii, Hyla lesueuri, Hyla prasina, Hyla quoyi, Hyla septentrionalis, Hyla suerii, Hyla sueurii, Rana gaimardii, Istriurus lesueurii, Istriurus sueurii and Trachycephalus marmoratus are discussed. A lectophoront (lectotype) is designated for Hyla septentrionalis and Trachycephalus marmoratus and neophoronts (neotypes) are designated for Hyla fulva, Hyla gaimardi and Hyla sueurii. © Publications scientifiques du Muséum national d'Histoire naturelle, Paris, 2018.
 
-Pontonia panamica n. sp.: A, B, anterior part of carapace, dorsal view; C, D, anterior part of carapace, lateral view; E-G, distal rostrum; A, E, ♀ holotype, pcl 7.4 mm (MNHN-Na 16392); B, ♂ allotype, pcl 5.5 mm (MNHN-Na 16393); C, F, ♀ paratype, pcl 6.0 mm (MNHN-Na 16394); D, G, ♂ paratype, pcl 4.8 mm (MNHN-Na 16394). Scale bars: 1 mm.
-Pontonia panamica n. sp., ♀ paratype, pcl 6.0 mm (MNHN-Na 16394): A, right fi rst pereiopod, lateral view; B, left second pereiopod, major cheliped, mesial view; C, same, distal chela; D, right second pereiopod, minor cheliped, mesial view; E, same, distal chela; G, left third pereiopod, mesial view. Scale bars: 1 mm.
-Pontonia panamica n. sp., ♂ paratype, pcl 4.8 mm (MNHN-Na 16394): A, left second pereiopod, major cheliped, mesial view; B, same, distal chela; C, right second pereiopod, minor cheliped, mesial view; D, same, distal chela. Scale bars: 1 mm.
-Pontonia panamica n. sp., ♂ paratype, pcl 4.8 mm (MNHN-Na 16394): A, third pereiopod dactylus; B, second pleopod, lateral view; C, same, detail of appendix masculina; D, endopod of fi rst pleopod, mesial view. Scale bars: A, D, 0.1 mm; B, 0.3 mm.
Article
Pontonia panamica n. sp., is described on the basis of 14 specimens from the Pacific coast of Panama. The new species associates with sea squirts, Ascidia cf. interrupta Heller, 1878 (Ascidiidae) attaching underneath rocks partly submerged in silty sand in the lower intertidal. Pontonia panamica n. sp. is closely related to P. longispina Holthuis, 1951 from the Gulf of California, but can be distinguished from the latter species by the absence of a subdistal tooth on the ventral margin of the rostrum; the more developed distolateral tooth on the first antennular segment; the longer proximal segments in the endopod of the second maxilliped; the dactylus of the minor cheliped with one simple triangular tooth on the cutting edge; and the comparatively longer carpi of both minor and major chelipeds. The recently proposed phylogeny of Pontonia (Fransen 2002) and the association of P panamica n. sp. with an ascidian host suggest a host switch from Ascidiacea to Mollusca relatively early in the evolutionary history of this genus. © Publications Scientifiques du Muséum national d'Histoire naturelle.
 
-Comparison of Anasser n. subgen. to similar Olivella Swainson, 1831 subgenera.
-Subgenus Olivina d'Orbigny, 1841; A-C, Olivella hyphala n. sp., holotype (MNHN); A, apertural view, 7.4 mm length; B, apex detail; C, plicae detail; D, E, Olivella klappenbachi n. sp., holotype (MNHN); D, apertural view, 5.5 mm length; E, apex detail. Scale bars: B, C, E, 500 µm.
Article
Anasser n. subgen., a new subgenus of Olivella Swainson, 1831, is proposed based on the absence of any kind of pillar structure and the presence of a parietal callus reaching the apertural end but not above it. Three new species are described from Brazilian deep waters: Olivella (Anasser) careorugula n. sp. is medium sized, oblong outline, whorls strongly convex and with a large subsutural white band; Olivella (Olivina) hyphala n. sp. is large, relatively big-belled and presents a milk-white subsutural belt; and Olivella (Olivina) klap-penbacbi n. sp. is medium sized, roughly obconic, resembling a whirligig with protoconch large and rounded.
 
-A, C, Cerambycobius mandrakae Risbec, 1952, ♂ paralectotype (A) and lectotype ♀ (C); B, Fanamokala perineti Risbec, 1960, lectotype. 
Article
The present contribution is a catalogue of the Jean Risbec collection, including specimens mounted on microscope slides and belonging to Eupelmidae Walker, 1833 or originally described in Eupelmidae, as well as the point-mounted or card mounted specimens originally on these slides. Lectotypes are designated for 19 species. Eleven new combinations are proposed. The genus Fanamokala Risbec, 1960 described in Pteromalidae Dalman, 1820 is treated as a junior synonym of Eupelmus Dalman, 1820, subgenus Episolindelia Girault, 1914 n. syn. The following seven specific or subspecific synonymies are made: Anastatus aliberti var. bruniptera Risbec, 1951, Anastatus nezarae Risbec, 1951, and Anastatus rhynchitidi Risbec, 1951 n. syn. of Anastatus (Anastatus) aliberti Risbec, 1951, Brasema leersiae var. garouae Risbec, 1955 n. syn. of Eupelmus (Episolindelia) australiensis (Girault, 1913), Brasema leersiae Risbec, 1956 n. syn. of Eupelmus (Episolindelia) testaceiventris (Motschulsky, 1863), Bruchocida batataephila Risbec, 1951 n. syn. of Eupelmus (Eupelmus) elongatus Risbec, 1851, and Macreupelmus australis Risbec, 1952 n. syn. of Eupelmus (Eupelmus) fissicollis Risbec, 1952. Specific status is proposed for Anastatus pseudocreobotrae Risbec, 1951 n. stat., Eupelmus (Macroneura) psychephagus Risbec, 1951 n. stat., Neanastatus bicolor Risbec, 1951 and Neanastatus platygasteri Risbec, 1956 n. stat., all described originally as varieties. Vignalia halyomorphae Risbec, 1951 is removed from synonymy under Anastatus nezarae Risbec, 1951 as Anastatus (Anastatus) halyomorphae (Risbec, 1951) rev. stat. and n. comb.
 
Article
A review of the morphology among members of the Dromiacea (and among other members of the Podotremata) revealed that the present classification of the Dromiidae does not reflect the wide variation of morphological patterns within the family. The Dromiidae are for the first time subdivided into three subfamilies: Dromiinae de Haan, 1833 n. status (type genus: Dromia Weber, 1795); Hypoconchinae n. subfam. (type genus: Hypoconcha Guerin-Meneville, 1854); and Sphaerodromiinae n. subfam. (type genus: Sphaerodromia Alcock, 1899). Thirty-eight dromiid genera are recognized herein: 34 in the Dromiinae n. status, five of which are new: Lamarckdromia n. gen. (type species: Dromia globosa Lamarck, 1818), Lewindromia n. gen. (type species: Cryptodromiopsis unidentata Ruppell, 1830), Mclaydromia n. gen. (type species: Mclaydromia colini n. gen., n. sp.), Moreiradromid n. gen. (type species: Dromidia antillensis Stimpson, 1858), and Stebbingdromia n. gen. (type species: Dromidiopsis plumosa Lewinsohn, 1984); one in the Hypoconchinae n. subfam. (Hypoconcha Guerin-Meneville,1854); and two in the Sphaerodromiinae n. subfam. (Sphaerodromia, Eodromia McLay, 1993). The diagnoses of the following four dromiine genera are emended: Austrodromidia McLay, 1993; Cryptodromiopsis Borradaile, 1903; Dromidia Stimpson, 1858; and Dromidiopsis Borradaile, 1900. The monotypic Platydromia Brocchi, 1877 (type species: Dromia spongiosa Stimpson, 1858) is resurrected. Seven dromiine genera are discussed in detail: Conchoecetes Stimpson, 1858; Desmodromia McLay, 2001; Epipedodromia Andre, 1932; Fultodromia McLay, 1993; Hemisphaerodromia Barnard, 1954; Homalodromia Miers, 1884; and Pseudodromia Stimpson, 1858. Sphaerodromia, Eodromia, Hypoconcha and the enigmatic Frodromia are analyzed in detail. Special reference is made to the morphology of the thoracic sternum, spermathecae at the extremity of sternal sutures 7/8, uropods, vestigial male pleopods on abdominal somites 3-5, coxa of the fifth pereopod and the penis. A key to the families of the Dromiacea and the subfamilies of the Dromiidae is provided.
 
Article
A new family Leptograpsodidae n. fam. is erected to include an unusual genus of grapsoid crabs, LeptograpsodesMontgomery, 1931, represented by a burrowing species from South Australia L. octodentatus (H. Milne Edwards, 1837), with setal pouches on the coxae of pereiopods 2 to 4 that are evidence of a high degree of terrestrial adaptation. With nearly 600 extant species, the superfamily Grapsoidea MacLeay, 1838 encompasses a diverse range of morphologies and ecologies. Genetic data question its monophyly, whereas the inter- and intrarelationships of included taxa have not been recently examined through a morphological review using a reliable complex of characters (primarily, proepistome, thoracic sternum, male pleon, male genital region, male gonopore, and penis). The reevalution of the morphological characters of L. octodentatus in order to reappraise its proper taxonomical status has afforded us the opportunity to review most of grapsoids and, in particular, the Gecarcinidae H. Milne Edwards, 1837 (see Appendix), Grapsidae MacLeay, 1838, Varunidae H. Milne Edwards, 1853 (especially Cyclograpsus H. Milne Edwards, 1837), and Xenograpsidae N. K. Ng, Davie, Schubart & Ng, 2007. The discovery that Leptograpsodes shares some characters with Gecarcinidae, especially a stridulatory apparatus similar to that of Discoplax A. Milne-Edwards, 1867, a feature not previously recorded in either genus, has revealed the need to re-examine the taxonomy of Gecarcinidae. This resulted in an unexpected outcome. Discoplax must be restricted to its three troglobitic species: D. longipes A. Milne-Edwards, 1867 (type species), D. gracilipesNg & Guinot, 2001, and D. michalisNg & Shih, 2015. Cardisoma Latreille, 1828 sensu stricto only accommodates C. guanhumi Latreille, in Latreille, Le Peletier, Serville & Guérin, 1828 (type species), C. armatum Herklots, 1861, C. carnifex (Herbst, 1796), and C. crassum Smith, 1870. A new genus, Tuerkayana n. gen. is hereby established to include two species previously assigned to Cardisoma: T. rotundum (Quoy & Gaimard, 1824) n. comb. (type species), T. hirtipes (Dana, 1851) n. comb., plus two others previously regarded as Discoplax: T. celeste (Ng & Davie, 2012) n. comb. and T. magnum (Ng & Shih, 2014) n. comb. Compared to Varunidae, Leptograpsodes bears a superficial resemblance to Cyclograpsus H. Milne Edwards, 1837, a paraphyletic genus that must be restricted to its type species C. punctatus H. Milne Edwards, 1837 and only its closest congeners. The validity of the subfamilial taxon Heliceinae Sakai, Türkay & Yang, 2006 is recognised. The putative sister-group relationship of Leptograpsodes and Xenograpsus supported by molecular analyses of Schubart (2011) and Ip et al. (2015) is not confirmed by morphology, even if the two families share some traits. The synapomorphies of Leptograpsodes justify its separation from all grapsoid lineages as currently conceived. The use of previously overlooked traits, notably related to the thoracic sternum, proves to represent an optimal support for the brachyuran systematics and phylogeny, and presently to redefine the grapsoid taxonomical categories. The complete fusion of thoracic sternites 3 and 4 without any visible suture, even laterally, is proposed as a synapomorphy of Grapsoidea; this character state could be extented to other Thoracotremata in the future. Species of three genera Leptograpsodes, Discoplax and Epigrapsus are reported to exhibit stridulating structures (suborbital pars stridens and plectrum on inner margin of P1 merus). Some nomenclature issues, notably the authorship of the family-group name Gecarcinidae that is here credited to H. Milne Edwards, 1837, are addressed in the Appendix.
 
Article
The current knowledge of the fauna of Cholevinae Kirby, 1837 is scarce and fragmentary. A synthesis of our knowledge of the Cholevinae fauna of the Maritime Alps is presented in the form of an annotated and updated checklist, based on both published and new records. Biogeographical and taxonomic remarks are provided, stressing the presence of five endemic species in the areas less impacted by the last glaciation.Les Cholevinae (Coleoptera, Leiodidae) des Alpes-Maritimes.Une synthèse de la faune des Cholevinae Kirby, 1837 des Alpes-Maritimes est présentée, sous la forme d'une liste revue et annotée des 21 espèces connues à ce jour de la région, établie à partir des données de la littérature et de collectes inédites. Des remarques biogéographiques et taxonomiques sont proposées en conclusion du travail, soulignant la présence de cinq espèces endémiques dans les zones les moins impactées lors de la dernière glaciation.
 
Article
Based on bibliographic data, material from coll. E. Angelier and own field work of the author done in the late 20th century, a survey is given on the diversity and distribution of spring- and stream-dwelling water mites of the genus Atractides Koch, 1837 on Corsica and Sardinia. Published information on presence of Atractides in the area covered was restricted to Corsica (Angelier 1954a, b; Santucci 1965, 1971, 1977; Giudicelli 1970; Gerecke & Di Sabatino 2013). Redescriptions are given of the incompletely documented species Atractides gracilipes (E. Angelier, 1951) (no more documented by type material) and A. corsicus E. Angelier, 1954 (of which six syntypes could be detected in NHMB). Published records (in brackets) are referred to the species A. robustus (Sokolow, 1940) and A. acutirostris Motaq & Angelier, 1928. In total, 24 Atractides species are now known from the two islands, 50% of them recorded here for the first time: Atractides allgaier Gerecke, 2003, A. clavipes Lundblad, 1954, A. fonticolus (K. Viets, 1950), A. graecus K. Viets, 1950, A. inflatus (Walter, 1925), A. loricatus Piersing, 1898,A. macro laminatus Lash, 1956,A. orghidani Motaq &Tanasachi, 1960, A. polyporus (K. Viets, 1922), A. protendens K.O.Viets, 1955, A. spinipes Koch, 1837, A. valencianus K. Viets, 1930. Of the 20 species known from Corsica, nine are first records from Sardinia all 19 Atractides species are recorded for the first time. Concerning the national faunas, six species are new for Italy (A. allgaier, A. corsicus, A. giustinii Gerecke & Di Sabatino, 2013, A. gracilipes, A. orghidani, A. valencianus), three for France (A. graecus, A. macrolaminatus, A. protendens).
 
Article
The genus Amphithectus Hartig, 1840 is reviewed and differentiated from Sarothrus Hartig, 1840. The type species Amphithectus areolatus Hartig, 1840 is redescribed and a new species, Amphithectus coriaceus n. sp., is described. This new species is the first Amphithectus species described since the description of the type species in 1840. Amphithectus coriaceus n. sp. is characterised by having fine coriaceous sculpture in the head and mesoscutum. Both species are fully illustrated with SEM pictures.Révision du genre Amphithectus Hartig, 1840 (Hymenoptera: Cynipoidea: Figitidae: Figitinae), avec la description de Amphithectus coriaceus n. sp.Le genre Amphithectus Hartig, 1840 est révisé et différencié de Sarothrus Hartig, 1840. L'espèce type Amphithectus areolatus Hartig, 1840 est redécrite et Amphithectus coriaceus n. sp. est décrite. Cette nouvelle espèce est la première depuis la description de l'espèce type en 1840. Amphithectus coriaceus n. sp. est caractérisée par de fines sculptures présentes sur la tête et le mésoscutum. Les deux espèces sont entièrement illustrées par des images obtenues par Microscope Électronique à Balayage.
 
Article
A revision of the genus Cerobates Schoenherr, 1840 (Coleoptera, Brentidae) is proposed, including four synonymisations: C. puerilis Kleine, 1936 = C matanganus Damoiseau, 1987 n. syn.; C. birmanicus Senna. 1894 = C. collectivus Kleine, 1925 n. syn., C usambaricus Senna, 1896 = C punctulatus Senna, 1898 n. syn,; C. cingulatus Kleine, 1939 = C. nigrothorax Damoiseau, 1987 n. syn. The females of two species (C. maai Damoiseau, 1987, and C. pasteuri Senna, 1898) are reported for the first time, and a new species (C zazae n. sp.) is described from New Guinea. It differs from the other known species of the genus by the strong Carinae under the prothorax of the males and by the form of the male and female genitalia, An identification key, including all the species of the genus, is provided, as well as sonic original biogeographical datas. At last, the systematic positions of the different species within the genus are assessed upon suspected synapomorphies, and the monophyly of the subgenera Cerobates s.s. and lonthocerus Lacordaire, 1866 is discussed. The last one seems to be monophyletic if the species C (I.) curtus Damoiscau, 1967 is excluded.
 
Article
The Neotropical genus Teramocerus Schoenherr, 1840 is redefined on the basis of a taxonomic revision and of a phylogeny. In addition to several other characters of the external morphology, detailed examination of sclerites and ornamentation of the internal sac of aedeagus was used for the first time in Brentidae Billberg, 1820, providing several new characters, with also potential interest for the study of the tribe Acratini and possibly the family. Two new synonymies are proposed at generic level: Acratus Lacordaire, 1865, n. syn. for Teramocerus and Proteramocerus Kleine, 1921, n. syn. for Teramocerus. Five new species are described from Amazonian Basin and French Guiana: Teramocerus amazonicus n. sp., T. brulei n. sp., T. curtirostris n. sp., T. pulchriformis n. sp. and T. trichosternon n. sp. Because of the synonymy between Proteramocerus and Acratus with Teramocerus, seven new combinations are proposed: Teramocerus appendiculatus (Soares & Scivittaro, 1972) n. comb., T. badius Boheman, 1840, comb. rev., T. forficula (Soares & Scivittaro, 1972) n. comb., T. opacus (Perty, 1832) n. comb., T. pulcher (Soares & Dias, 1971) n. comb., T. suturalis (Lund, 1800) n. comb., and T. zellibori (Soares & Dias, 1971) n. comb. Several new synonymies are given at specific level: Acratus fidelis Kleine, 1927, n. syn. for Teramocerus badius, Proteramocerus aeneus Soares & Dias, 1971, n. syn for T. eletus Kleine, 1927, P. oliveirai Soares & Dias, 1971, n. syn. for T. eletus Kleine, 1927, P. emendatus Kleine, 1927, n. syn. for T. janthinus Boheman, 1840, P. eminens Kleine, 1927, n. syn. for T. janthinus, P. villens Soares & Dias, 1971, n. syn. for T. janthinus, Brenthus acutipennis Boheman, 1833, n. syn. for T. opacus, T. obscurus Perroud, 1853, n. syn. for T. opacus. Trachelizus helmenreichii Redtenbacher, 1868 is removed from synonymy with Teramocerus suturalis and transferred to the genus Nemobrenthus Sharp, 1895, giving the new combination Nemobrenthus helmenreichii (Redtenbacher, 1868) n. comb. Maps are provided for examined specimens of each species. An identification key is given for males and females. In a second part, a phylogenetic analysis is made to test monophyly and species assemblage of the newly defined genus Teramocerus. Maximum parsimony and Bayesian analysis were performed on a matrix of 40 morphological characters of the adults and 25 taxa; 19 were supposed to belong to Teramocerus in the meaning given here, the six others to various Acratini and Trachelizini. Both analyses show that type species of all the genera synonymized are indeed completely included in Teramocerus, this genus being then monophyletic in its new definition.
 
Article
Investigation of the types of Columbella albina Kiener, 1841 indicate that this species is a junior synonym of Graphicomassa ligula (Duclos, 1840), leaving the species typically identified as Graphicomassaalbina (Kiener, 1841) without a name. The species is quite variable and has inspired a number of synonyms over the years; the oldest of these, Colombella adiostina Duclos, 1840, now becomes the basis for the valid name for this species. In this paper, Graphicomassa ligula and G. adiostina n. comb. are both discussed comparatively. © Publications scientifiques du Muséum national d'Histoire naturelle, Paris.
 
Mesoscutum in dorsal view of: A, Xyalaspis armata (Giraud, 1860); B, Xyalaspis hyalina Belizin, 1951; C, Xyalaspis laevigata Hartig, 1843; D, Xyalaspis petiolata Kieffer, 1901; E, G, Xyalaspis pseudolaevigata Mata-Casanova & Pujade-Villar, n. sp.; F, Xyalaspis rugosa Hartig, 1843. Scale bars: A–D, F, 200 µm; E, G, 100 µm.
Mesoscutum sculpture variability in: A, B, Xyalaspis petiolata Kieffer, 1901; C, D Xyalaspis laevigata Hartig, 1843. Scale bars: 200 µm.
Metasoma of: A, Xyalaspis armata (Giraud, 1860); B, Xyalaspis petiolata Kieffer, 1901; arrows marking the petiole. Scale bars: 200 µm.
Article
Révision du genre Xyalaspis Hartig, 1843 (Hymenoptera: Figitidae: Anacharitinae) dans le Paléarctique occidental.Le genre Xyalaspis Hartig, 1843 (Hymenoptera: Anacharitinae) est révisé pour le Paléarctique occidental. Xyalaspis spinigera Reinhard, 1860 et Xyalaspis subulifera (Thomson, 1862) sont mis en synonymie avec Xyalaspis laevigata Hartig, 1843 et Xyalaspis rugosa Hartig, 1843 respectivement, et l'aire de distribution de ces espèces est étendue. Une nouvelle espèce est décrite pour la France : Xyalaspis pseudolaevigata n. sp. Xyalaspis laevis (Hedicke, 1914), est transféré au genre Aegilips Haliday, 1835. Les caractéristiques diagnostiques plus importantes sont illustrées. Des données sur la biologie, la distribution et la variabilité morphologique des espèces sont discutées. Une clé pour différencier les espèces ouest paléarctiques est rédigée.
 
Article
A review of species of the deep-sea sponge-associated shrimp genera Spongicola de Haan, 1844 and Pamspongicola de Saint Laurent & Cleva, 1981 (Decapoda, Stenopodidea) is presented on the basis of rich collections made by French expeditions in the Indo-West Pacific, supplemented by collections preserved in various institutions in the world. Seven species are recognized in Spongicola, of which three are new to science: S. venustus de Haan, 1844, S. andamanicus Alcock, 1901, S. levigatus Hayashi & Ogawa, 1987, S. parvispinus Zarenkov, 1990, 5. depressus n. sp. from Loyalty Islands, S. goyi n. sp. from Japan, Indonesia, New Caledonia and Vanuatu, and S. robustus n. sp. from Mauritius and Mozambique. Subspecific division of S. andamanicus Alcock, 1901, proposed by de Saint Laurent & Cleva (1981), is abandoned, since our morphological analysis strongly suggests that the division does not reflect a population structure of the species; S. holthuisi de Saint Laurent & Cleva, 1981, is also reduced to a junior synonym of S. andamanicus. Two species are recognized in Pamspongicola., both previously described, viz. P. pusillus de Saint Laurent & Cleva, 1981 and P. inflatus (de Saint Laurent & Cleva, 1981) n. comb., of which the latter is here transferred from Spongicola. Keys in aid for identification are provided for each genus. Geographic and bathymetric distributions of species are briefly discussed. Association with host sponges was verified for some species.
 
Article
Two species of scorpions were collected during the SANTO 2006 Expedition: Liocheles australasiae (Fabricius, 1775), family Liochelidae Fet & Bechly, 2001 and, Lychas santoensis n. sp., family Buthidae C. L. Koch, 1837. The new species is characterized by: moderate to small size for the genus (from 29 to 31 mm in total length); general colouration reddish-yellow to reddish-brown with intense blackish variegated pigmentation throughout body and appendages; pectines with 10 to 12 teeth; fulcra absent or inconspicuous; telson moderately elongated; aculeus moderately curved; subaculear tooth moderate and, between rhomboid and spinoid in shape; granules on the ventral surface inconspicuous; tibial spurs present on legs III and IV; pedipalp fixed and movable fingers with 6-7 (6) rows of granules, and with one very inconspicuous external accessory granule next to the most basal row of granules. © Publications Scientifiques du Muséum national d'Histoire naturelle, Paris.
 
Top-cited authors
Alain Dubois
  • Muséum National d'Histoire Naturelle
Daniele Guinot
  • Muséum National d'Histoire Naturelle
Jean-Lou Justine
  • Muséum National d'Histoire Naturelle
Barrie G. M. Jamieson
  • The University of Queensland
Walter Antonio Boeger
  • Universidade Federal do Paraná