The Slavic and East European Journal

Published by American Association of Teachers of Slavic and East European Languages
Online ISSN: 0037-6752
Publications
Article
"This book is the first study of the dynamics and individual character of the Russian reception of Rousseau. An earlier version of the manuscript was reviewed by the Harriman Institute in 1994, and was subseuqently revised and resubmitted. ""Although much has been written about Rousseau in Russia, there is nothing as comprehensive nor as sophisticated as Barran's book."" --Gitta Hammarberg, Macalester College "
 
Article
In 1833 Alexander Pushkin began to explore the topic of madness, a subject little explored in Russian literature before his time. The works he produced on the theme are three of his greatest masterpieces: the prose novella The Queen of Spades, the narrative poem The Bronze Horseman, and the lyric "God Grant That I Not Lose My Mind." Gary Rosenshield presents a new interpretation of Pushkin’s genius through an examination of his various representations of madness. Pushkin brilliantly explored both the destructive and creative sides of madness, a strange fusion of violence and insight. In this study, Rosenshield illustrates the surprising valorization of madness in The Queen of Spades and "God Grant That I Not Lose My Mind" and analyzes The Bronze Horseman’s confrontation with the legacy of Peter the Great, a cornerstone figure of Russian history. Drawing on themes of madness in western literature, Rosenshield situates Pushkin in a greater framework with such luminaries as Shakespeare, Sophocles, Cervantes, and Dostoevsky providing an insightful and absorbing study of Russia’s greatest writer.
 
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Thesis (Ph. D.)--Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures, Stanford University. Bibliography: leaves 282-299. Copyright.
 
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The dictionary covers phraseological fusions, units, and combinations; single words used figuratively; and colloquialisms. Each idiom or colloquialism, translated into English, is accompanied by a sentence in Russian showing its correct use. Approximately one-fifth of the illustrative text is drawn from the classics most frequently studied in undergraduate and graduate Russian courses. An index to writers quoted and a bibliography are included. The work presupposes knowledge of basic Russian grammar and a vocabulary of about 2,000 words. The native speaker of Russian will be able to use this book to develop greater sophistication in English. The advanced student, the teacher, and the specialist who reads Russian will find this an invaluable guide to the subtleties of Russian usage. The work presupposes knowledge of basic Russian grammar and a vocabulary of about 2,000 words. The native speaker of Russian will be able to use this book to develop greater sophistication in English. The advanced student, the teacher, and the specialist who reads Russian will find this an invaluable guide to the subtleties of Russian usage.
 
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Thèse--Paris. Includes bibliographical references.
 
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Thesis (Ph. D.)--Indiana University, 1973. Vita.
 
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Thesis (Ph. D.)--University of California, Los Angeles, 1991. Vita. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 219-226).
 
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"Winner of the 1993 PEN Book-of-the-Month Club Translation Prize Published in 1776 and considered the first Polish novel ever written, The Adventures of Mr. Nicholas Wisdom is a picaresque tale following the naïve title character's coming of age. Having conquered (and fled) sophisticated Warsaw, Nicholas enjoys many adventures across Europe, South America, and the high seas. He finally lands among the natives of an unknown isle who reject his allegedly superior European ways and instead tutor him for an ""enlightened"" existence. Resonant with Enlightenment ideas, The Adventures of Mr. Nicholas Wisdom provides a sly portrait of the era's Polish society and a fascinating perspective on the broader problems of eighteenth-century European culture. ""The book is a real find, not only in its dynamic synthesis of all the best literary models of the time--Fielding's Tom Jones, Rousseau's Emile, Voltaire's Candide, and Defoe's Robinson Crusoe--but also in the fleet Swiftian prose."" --Chicago Tribune"
 
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DISSERTATION (PH.D.)--THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN Dissertation Abstracts International,
 
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IF STATISTICS WERE AVAILABLE ON THE DROPOUT RATE AND UNSATISFACTORY ACHIEVEMENT OF COLLEGE STUDENTS TAKING RUSSIAN, THEY WOULD PROBABLY SUPPORT THE WIDELY HELD OPINION THAT RUSSIAN IS DIFFICULT. THE DIFFICULTY IS ATTRIBUTABLE LARGELY TO THE FACT THAT RUSSIAN IS NEITHER A GERMANIC NOR A ROMANCE LANGUAGE, AND STUDENTS THUS FIND IT HARD TO RECOGNIZE COGNATES AND TO ACQUIRE AN ACTIVE VOCABULARY. NEW TEXTBOOKS AND METHODS, BOTH AUDIOLINGUAL AND GRAMMAR-TRANSLATION ARE NEEDED THAT WILL FACE THE VOCABULARY PROBLEM. INSTEAD OF REQUIRING AN ACTIVE COMMAND OF GRAMMAR AND VOCABULARY FROM THE OUTSET, TEACHERS SHOULD AIM AT DEVELOPING IN THEIR STUDENTS AN ACCURATE PRONUNCIATION, A THOROUGH BUT PASSIVE COMMAND OF GRAMMAR, AND A LARGE READING VOCABULARY. THESE SKILLS, ADMITTEDLY, ARE GAINED AT THE EXPENSE OF A LIMITED AND DOUBTFUL ORAL FLUENCY. IN THE FIRST TERM OF COLLEGE WORK THE BASIC ELEMENTS OF GRAMMAR AND A 300-WORD VOCABULARY SHOULD BE COVERED. THE OTHER TERMS SHOULD BE DEVOTED TO DEVELOPING A LARGE PASSIVE VOCABULARY BY MEANS OF READERS WITH VISIBLE VOCABULARIES AND STIMULATING MATERIAL ON RUSSIAN CULTURE. AFTER 2 YEARS OF NONINTENSIVE COURSES THE STUDENT WILL HAVE A CORRECT PRONUNCIATION, A RELIABLE COMMAND OF GRAMMAR, UNUSUAL FLUENCY IN READING, INSIGHT INTO RUSSIAN CULTURE, AND THE DESIRE AS WELL AS THE SOLID BASIS FOR GOING ON TO ADVANCED COURSES. THIS ARTICLE IS PUBLISHED IN "THE SLAVIC AND EAST EUROPEAN JOURNAL, "VOLUME 10, NUMBER 1, SPRING 1966. (AUTHOR)
 
Article
THE TABLES AND ACCOMPANYING EXPLANATIONS IN THIS OUTLINE ARE INTENDED FOR THE NON-SPECIALIST IN SLAVIC LANGUAGES WHO WISHES TO LEARN THE APPROXIMATE PRONUNCIATION AND TRANSLITERATION OF WORDS WRITTEN IN THE SLAVIC ALPHABET. EACH ALPHABET TREATED (CZECH, RUSSIAN, UKRAINIAN, BIELORUSSIAN, BULGARIAN, SLOVENIAN, SERBO-CROATIAN, POLISH, CHURCH SLAVIC, AND MACEDONIAN) IS PRESENTED SEPARATELY IN TABLE FORM. A BRIEF HISTORY OF THE ADOPTION AND USE OF EACH ALPHABET IS GIVEN WITH APPROXIMATE ENGLISH EQUIVALENTS FOR SOME OF THE SOUNDS REPRESENTED BY THE CYRILLIC OR LATIN LETTERS. THIS DOCUMENT IS ALSO AVAILABLE FOR $0.75 FROM THE AUTHOR, UNIVERSITY OF PITTSBURGH, PITTSBURGH, PA. 15213. (JD)
 
Article
America's lag behind many countries in foreign language training, particularly the Soviet Union, is examined from the viewpoint of her ever-increasing need for foreign language proficiency in many areas. Differences between domestic and foreign curriculums are considered and a proposal is made, based on the specific assumption that what is needed is a required foreign language program beginning in the elementary school. In addition, the author argues that the program must be continuous through graduation from high school in order to guarantee mastery of the target language. (GK)
 
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An overview of the status of Russian and non-Western studies in American schools serves as a handbook for educators and administrators at all levels. Three major essays include: (1) "Graduate Study of Russian," (2) "Russian and Other Non-Western Areas in Undergraduate Education," and (3) "The Study of Russian in Secondary Education." Methods, teacher training, curriculum content, and placement are discussed in this appraisal of the achievements, problems, and shortcomings of the American approach to non-Western studies. Concrete suggestions for future development are similarly offered. Tables, largely covering the period from 1946 to 1958, include data concerning educational degrees and Columbia, Harvard, and Indiana Universities. (RL)
 
Article
"The author of several volumes of poetry in Russian and English, Ilya Kutik is also a consummate essayist in the Russian tradition: aphoristic, allusive, deploying unlikely juxtapositions and poetic measures to arrive at surprising and gratifying insights. In this first English-language collection of Kutik's essays, readers encounter one of the best and most original contemporary Russian stylists."
 
Top-cited authors
James Wertsch
  • Washington University in St. Louis
Henryk Baran
  • University at Albany, The State University of New York
Mikhail Molchanov
Stephen Hutchings
  • The University of Manchester
Ian Hancock
  • University of Texas at Austin