The Journal of Negro Education

Online ISSN: 0022-2984
Publications
Article
Researchers have called for innovative and culturally responsive intervention programs to enhance male, African American middle school students' academic achievement. Mentoring has received considerable attention as a novel remedy. Although anecdotal evidence supports the positive role of mentoring on academic achievement, these results are not consistent. The Benjamin E. Mays Institute (BEMI) builds on the ideals of mentoring to counter the effects academic underachievement among adolescent Black males by building a model that is Afro-centric, uses pro-social modeling, and emphasizes cultural strengths and pride, and single-sex instruction in a dual-sex educational environment. Sixty-one middle-school Black males were enrolled (BEMI: n=29; Comparison: n=32) in this study. Results revealed that students in the BEMI program had significantly greater academic attachment scores and academic success than their non-mentored peers. Additionally, racial identity attitudes of immersion/emersion and internalization and identification with academics were also significantly associated with standardized achievement tests and GPA. Policy and practice implications are discussed.
 
Article
Because the history of "day care" as a response to maternal employment patterns is so tightly interwoven with that of early childhood education, this monograph focuses first on the rise of a two-tier system for the care and education of the preschool child. On the one hand, for middle-income groups, there arose a nursery school and kindergarten system whose primary focus was to supplement the enrichment available at home. Diverse in their origins and purposes, nursery schools and kindergartens were held together as a system by their explicit aim of educating and socializing the growing child. On the other hand, for lower income groups, a childminding or day-care system was created in response to the necessity of maternal employment outside the home. Second, this report will examine some of the numerous consequences for poor children and their families of such a stratified system of preschool care and education. The most important of these was the stigmatization of child care as a tool or function of social welfare—a temporary, short-term, emergency system for dealing with the "crises" surrounding maternal employment and out-of-home care for the child. Further, as a result of various "suitable home" eligibility requirements established for applicants of social welfare benefits, minorities (especially Blacks) have consistently suffered from exclusion from the system. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved)
 
Article
Reviews over 120 published and unpublished studies on the relationship between desegregation and academic achievement and the effect of desegregation on self-confidence, aspiration, and racial prejudices in children. Methodological issues in the studies and the social costs of various desegregation options are examined, in addition to the thesis that school desegregation is a many-faceted problem, having both good and bad effects on different types of children. (29 p ref) (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved)
 
Article
"… there is a racial subgroup differential in the rates of first admissions to Ohio State mental hospitals which is inversely related to the factors of income, occupational prestige, education, and socio-economic status." The high prevalence of mental illness among Negroes as compared to Whites seems, therefore, to be a function of the low status of the Negro rather than some biological or genetic difference due to "race." (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved)
 
Article
"Field study number III." Thesis (Ed. D.)--Colorado State College of Education, Division of Education, 1944. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 46-49).
 
Article
The founding and development of private, primarily church-related, black colleges in Texas from 1865-1954 are reviewed, with focus primarily on 11 institutions that offered college-level work. Comparisons are made to public black colleges of Texas as well as to other black U.S. colleges and universities. Topical areas include: institutional mission and purpose, administrative and faculty development, academic and vocational curricula, finances, and student life. It is noted that mission statements are among the earliest descriptions of what these colleges stood for and what they hoped to accomplish. They also provide valuable clues to each school's priorities with respect to religious, professional, and vocational training. As a consequence of debate over the definition, purpose, and needs of black colleges, a dualistic type of liberal arts-vocational curriculum emerged in most of these institutions. Additional controversies and problems experienced by the institutions included poor financing, limited facilities, and shortages of teachers and equipment. Evidence is presented to support the revisionist view of these schools as valuable social institutions instead of the corrupt and inadequate imitations critics have described. Included are descriptions of black college presidents and administrators. (SW)
 
Article
Thesis (Ed. D.)--Indiana University, 1957. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 200-214). Photocopy.
 
Article
Typescript. Type C project. Includes tables. Thesis (Ed.D.)--Teachers College, Columbia University, 1953. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 141-143)
 
Article
This article presents the text of a lecture delivered by American Educational Research Association President Carol D. Lee at the 29th Annual Charles H. Thompson Lecture-Colloquium Series which was held on November 5, 2008. In her lecture, Lee discussed several points of similarities between W. E. B. Du Bois and President Barack Obama. These similarities in background, education, and in their ideas on politics and power are historically connected with implications for educating Black people though race consciousness.
 
Article
This volume presents the stories of 11 African American women working in higher education and confronting racist and sexist practices. The chapters have the following titles and authors: (1) "Mixed Blood, New Voices" (Kaylynn Sullivan Two Trees); (2) "Carrying On" (Joyce Scott); (3) "African Philosophy, Theory, and 'Living Thinkers'" (Joy James); (4) "American Studies: Melting Pot or Pressure Cooker?" (Elizabeth H. Freydberg); (5) "Teaching Comparative Social Order and Caribbean Social Change" (Helen E. Page); (6) "Making Room for Emancipatory Research in Psychology: A Multicultural Feminist Perspective" (Kim Vaz); (7) "Deconstructing, Reconstructing, and Focusing on our Literary Image" (Nagueyalti Warren ); (8) "Teaching Theory, Talking Community" (Joy James); (9) "The Revolution Within: Transforming Ourselves" (Patricia Coleman-Burns); (10) "African American Women Teachers Speak About Child Abuse" (Dianne Smith); (11) "Balancing the Personal and Professional" (Adrianne R. Andrews); and (12) "Place but not Importance: The Race for Inclusion in Academe" (Ruth Farmer). Also included are ten syllabi and proposals for audiovisual resources, a visitation workshop, teaching grant, curriculum study, and proposals for studies of black women in America, the Caribbean social order, the psychology of women, a survey of black women's fiction, black social and political thought, and women of the African Diaspora. Notes on the contributors are provided. (Contains a bibliography of over 400 items.) (JB)
 
Article
Typescript (photocopy). "Graduate Program Social and Philosophical Foundations of Education." Thesis (doctoral)--Rutgers University, 1984. Includes abstract. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 126-128).
 
Article
This study examined the link between family ethnic/race socialization and Black kindergarteners' and first graders' academic performance as measured by their general knowledge, math, and reading assessment scores. Drawing on identity theory, the authors predicted that repeated instances of family ethnic/race socialization would increase academic performance by affirming self-schemas and preparing young Black children for racialized experiences. Survey data used to address the prediction were nationally representative and longitudinal, and gathered as part of the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study, Kindergarten Cohort (ECLS-K). Results showed that routine family ethnic/race socialization was associated with high assessment scores from kindergarten to first grade. Overall identity theory was supported but certain results were unexpected. For example, there was evidence of a curvilinear relationship between family ethnic/race socialization and academic performance where too infrequent or frequent socialization had negligible impact. (Contains 8 tables.)
 
Article
In spite of repeated considerations and positive action to engage, retain and advance African Americans in executive positions, there are only a few African Americans in executive level administration posts in colleges and universities. An analysis of the status of African Americans in higher and post secondary education shows that legislation alone does not foster change, but requires key decision makers and leaders to focus on changing the institution culture in support of goals linked closely to theories like representative bureaucracy.
 
Article
This study examined the relationships among self-efficacy beliefs, intrinsic and extrinsic motivation, and academic adjustment among 111 African American women in college. Results revealed that self-efficacy beliefs predicted Motivation to Know, Externally Regulated motivation, Identified motivation, and academic adjustment. Furthermore, Motivation to Know partially mediated the relationship between self-efficacy beliefs and academic adjustment. Contrary to prediction, extrinsic motivation did not mediate the relationship between self-efficacy beliefs and academic adjustment. The implications of these findings for faculty, higher education administrators, and mental health counselors are provided, as well directions for future research. (Contains 2 figures and 1 table.)
 
Article
A relationship exists between an individuals' perception of his ability to learn and his academic achievement. This paper reports the findings of a study designed to identify the level of self-concept of academic ability of 121 students, comprised of 108 blacks (64 males and 44 females) and 13 whites (7males and 6 females), upon enrollment in and completion of a pre-college compensatory education program in New York State during 1968-1969. Enrollment in compensatory education constitutes one academic role, while completion constitutes another role. The Brookover Self-Concept-of-Academic-Ability Scale was administered to subjects upon entering and again upon completing the program. It was theorized that there would be a positive change in self-concept of academic ability of 1) each subject as a result of moving from one role to another; 2) black and white subjects from test 1 to test 2; and, 3) both male and female subjects from test 1 to test 2. It was concluded that changes in academic roles had a positive effect on the self-concept of academic ability of male and female black subjects; but only for white male subjects. The research indicates that compensatory education programs could positively affect self-concept improvement contributing to academic achievement. (Author/SJM)
 
Article
The academic performance of urban African American students continues to be a major concern. Academic achievement has been the main avenue to upward social mobility for African Americans. This study assesses the effect of attitudes, behavior, peers, and family on the academic performance of African American students living in urban public housing developments located in a large midwestern city. Results are presented from a sample of 238 African American adolescents aged 13-19 with a mean age of 15.6 years. Results suggested that youth with unfavorable attitudes toward deviance and who spend time involved in family activities are more likely to report above-average grades. As youth involvement in antisocial behavior and exposure to delinquent peers increased, they were less likely to report above-average grades. This investigation highlights the importance of examining family, peer, and individual correlates when assessing factors that influence academic performance among African American students living in public housing or similar urban settings. (Contains 1 table.)
 
Article
Learning communities continue to be at the heart of teaching and learning today. The purpose of this study is to examine the extent of the impact of the Freshman Academy/Learning Community program on student progress at a historically Black university. The authors also looked at the extent to which students engaged in their learning as a result of strategies developed and implemented based on the quality enhancement plan of "Strengthening the Quality of the Freshman-Year Experience through Student Engagement and Active Learning." Finally the extent of engagement and satisfaction with the program as reported by students were compared. The results showed some interesting differences in these core practices: active learning, integrated assignment, co-curricular and service learning activities. Performance was measured by analyzing student progression at the course, program, and university levels. The results are being used as feedback for program improvement. (Contains 6 tables.)
 
Article
Brown v. Board of Education (Brown I) was decided in 1954 by the United States Supreme Court to order the desegregation of students by race in public schools. Opposition to this order occurred in many of the states as well as from the Office of the President in the 1980s. Over time, alternatives to educating students have surfaced, some of which have the potential for under-mining the original ruling in the Brown decision. National support of education has come in the form of spending legislation that favors accountability and achievement over racial equity with newly funded schools virtually free to carry on the same discrimination as in the past. This article offers an analysis of these trends in American education, exposing the paradox of how an emphasis on supposed achievement trumps equality with quality. Within the current government activity, students of color will be doubtful recipients of either equality of opportunity or greater educator accountability.
 
Article
A research synthesis was conducted including three meta analyses, a review of the relevant literature, and supplemental analyses examining the relationship between personal faith and the reduction of the achievement gap. Personal faith included belief and adherence to any religion. The results of the three meta-analyses indicated that: (a) personal religious faith was one the two largest factors that consistently reduced the achievement gap: (b) personal religious commitment reduces the achievement gap by 50%; and (c) attending a religious school reduced the achievement gap by 25%. Supplemental analyses using a nationwide dataset added further significance to the findings. These analyses indicated that if an African American student was a person of faith and came from an intact family, the achievement gap disappeared entirely. (Contains 3 tables.)
 
Article
This article explores the ways in which race is implicated in efforts to address the achievement gap in U.S. schools. Through an analysis of the theoretical and historical issues that have framed the relationship between race and intellectual ability, the author explains why the effort to close the achievement gap is politically and socially significant. The efforts of two suburban school districts to address the achievement gap is presented to illustrate why some schools are making progress in closing the achievement gap while others are not. These cases are used to make a call for a new discourse about the role of race in student achievement and to clarify how and why race continues to be so controversial and confounding to educators who are working to ensure that all children, regardless of their backgrounds, receive a quality education and have the opportunity to experience academic success.
 
TAAS Reading, Gains From Preimplementation Year to 1998, SFA Schools vs. State of Texas, All Students, Grades 3-5 
TAAS Reading, Gains from Pre-implementation Year to 1998, SFA Schools vs. State of Texas, African-American Students, Grades 3-5 
Changes in African-American/White Gaps in Percent of Students Passing TAAS Reading, Grades 3-5, 1994-1998 
TAAS Reading, Gains from Pre-implementation Year to 1998, SFA Schools vs. State of Texas, Hispanic Students, Grades 3-5 
Article
Success for All is a comprehensive reform model that uses cooperative learning, tutoring, family support services, and extensive professional development to help high-poverty schools succeed with their students. This article reviews research on Success for All with African American students, focusing on evidence that Success for All reduces the achievement gap between African American and White students. More than 40 studies, including a national randomized experiment, have found positive effects of Success for All in schools serving many African Americans. Implications of these findings for policy and practice are discussed.
 
Article
Closing the racial achievement gap has been a cornerstone of recent education reform, especially as accountability measures are increasingly relied upon to drive academic performance standards. This article questions the term "achievement gap" and its implication that White students perform better on standardized tests due to greater effort and ability. The term "receivement gap" is offered as an alternative due to its focus on structures, not students, and inputs instead of outputs. Evidence is drawn from a qualitative project using a case study design with seven African American high school students in tracked mathematics and English classes. Results indicated differential treatment by differential treatment by school personnel as early as elementary school that influenced students' later school performance. Accordingly, research supports the recommended term "receivement gap," which is offered in the hope of inspiring a deeper and more nuanced discussion of factors that influence student achievement and distort the achievement of African American students.
 
Article
Typescript. Thesis (Ph. D.)--University of Wisconsin--Madison, 1944. Vita. Includes bibliographical references (leaves [155]-168).
 
Article
Thesis (Ph. D.)--Howard University, 1989. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 285-298).
 
Article
Research has repeatedly suggested that SES is a major factor in diminishing academic achievement of African American urban youth; however, there are other factors also influencing children’s achievement. In an effort to examine how other factors contribute to academic achievement, this study, investigated a subsample of 60 low-resource middle school parents and students (41 boys and 19 girls). Several questions addressed the relation of SES to achievement, support, social support and mother’s well-being, respectively. Additionally, the relations between mother’s well-being, and students’ perceived monitoring by their parents, and negative learning attitudes were examined as were the perception of parental monitoring and academic achievement, negative learning attitudes and achievement. The results revealed a significant relation between perceived social support and mother’s well-being but in a negative direction. Parents reporting lower levels of well-being reported higher levels of social support. The results also revealed that youth who perceived their parents to monitor their activities more had higher levels of achievement. These findings illustrate the importance of the perceptions of adolescents as well as the potential role of parental monitoring on adolescents’ academic achievement. Although several factors were examined, only those factors with significant relationships will be discussed.
 
Article
Leadership development has long been considered an important outcome of higher education, but the patterns of leadership development among students of color have not been widely studied. This article develops a theory of leadership as an outcome of engaged learning. Findings from this study of high-achieving, low-income students of color include: academic and social engagement were positively associated with holding leadership positions; compared to other minority groups, African Americans were more likely to be engaged academically and socially and to hold leadership positions as a consequence of engagement; and the amount of grant/scholarship aid was positively associated with holding leadership positions. (Contains 3 tables.)
 
Article
This book examines the policies and practices that create educational inequality in the United States and what can be done to reduce their influence. The introduction identifies children who are disadvantaged by the U.S. educational system, and documents the results of society's failure to serve them properly. Part One, which contains four chapters, describes the role governments play in causing education inequality and what they can do to help overcome it. Part two, in 12 chapters, examines the ways in which schools foster inequality and how they can be transformed into a force for educational equality, Part Three discusses the negative effects of university preparation of teachers and discusses how teacher education programs could be improved. (SLD)
 
Article
Using a critical race theory framework, this study examines the ways in which race and racialized ideologies are manifested in high-stakes college admissions, the debate over affirmative action, and the college choice behavior of Black high school students. This study allows for the voices of Black high school students in California to describe their lived experiences with Proposition 209, suggesting a deeper meaning to affirmative action than simply the ways in which it affected institutional practices related to admissions decisions. The results indicate that, following the end of affirmative action in California, Black students had altered perceptions of where they were welcome and where they belonged in higher education. The results of this study can help colleges and universities to create, maintain, or improve a positive and welcoming climate for students of color in the wake of such policy changes.
 
Article
Despite numerous recent events that have cast collegiate Black Greek-letter organizations (BGOs) in a negative light, many view these and other Greek organizations as important leadership development vehicles. This article reports on a study that examined the impact of BGO membership on Black students' involvement in campus-related activities and their leadership development. BGO members and students unaffiliated with BGOs attending historically Black and predominantly White institutions of higher education were compared. The results indicate that BGO members, regardless of campus type, evidenced greater student involvement and had more confidence in their leadership skills. They further suggest that BGO membership provides an important means by which to enhance student involvement and leadership development for Blacks in college and beyond.
 
Article
Thesis (M.A.)--Ohio State University, 1941. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 105-107).
 
Article
This bibliography provides an annotated list of 367 books and articles which address the subject of the education of black adults. The book is divided into five sections. The first includes resources on black education from 1619 to 1860. Education and training on the plantation, as well as in schools and special societies and through apprenticeships, is covered. The bibliography then lists literature covering the Civil War and Reconstruction period, 1860-1880. Included here are books which discuss the first efforts to reduce black illiteracy and the debate over the content and necessity of black education. The third section, covering the period from 1880 to 1930, lists sources concerned with the withdrawal of the Federal government from the realm of black education and black rights, and the implementation of the "separate but equal" doctrine. The fourth section, pertaining to the modern era, 1930 to the present, covers literature about the return of Federal support of black education and about various government programs. Finally, the fifth section lists "general resources," works which overlap the periods used to organize the bibliography. (KH)
 
Article
Data from the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction archive are used to assess the joint effect of race and gender on advanced academic (advanced placement and honors) course enrollment within a school district with an open enrollment policy. Using student SAT scores; the authors compare expected levels of advanced course enrollment for White and Black males and females to actual advanced course enrollment. The results generally reveal race to be a stronger predictor of class enrollment than gender. White students, regardless of gender, tend to enroll in advanced academic courses at a higher rate than do Black students. However, when comparing actual to expected enrollment based on average SAT scores, there does appear to be a gendered difference within each racial category. Theoretical and practical implications of these findings framed by an open enrollment policy are discussed. (Contains 2 tables and 1 figure.)
 
Article
This book presents affirmative strategies to rid schools of discrimination. Many of these strategies were developed as a result of research in four public high schools with large percentages of ethnic and language minority students in the deep south. The study, which consisted of 48 30-90 minute interviews, suggested that there is wide student resistance to both the formal and the hidden curriculum in public schooling in an urban context. This resistance is tied to students' perceptions of the lack of fairness and teacher stereotyping of minority students. Academic discrimination occurs when teachers explicitly display differences in the expectations they hold for academic achievement for students. Identity discrimination is a result of the hidden curriculum at urban schools and expresses itself when teachers identify low-income Latino and African American students with gangs and violence. At one urban school, where students were much more successful, the key difference seemed to be that the principal and teachers took deliberate affirmative steps to help make low-income black students academically and socially successful. Practices that promote success are detailed in these chapters: (1) "Discrimination--Subtle and Not-So-Subtle"; (2) "How Leaders Can Prepare for Action"; (3) "What Administrators Can Do"; (4) "How Teacher Inquiry Can Serve Community"; (5) "Deepening Student Governance"; (6) "Forging Community Partnerships"; (7) "Making City Government an Ally"; and (8) "Cultivating an Ethics of the Heart." (Contains 153 references and 23 resources.) (SLD)
 
Article
Thesis (Ed. D.)--University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, 1995. Includes abstract. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 207-218). Photocopy. s
 
Article
The preschool and early elementary years play a major role in transforming young African American boys from "brilliant babies" into "children placed at risk". A preschool to prison pipeline now exists that is becoming increasingly apparent. It runs from preschool settings through elementary and middle school, into the high schools from which young African American men continue to drop out in staggering numbers, and ultimately, into federal and state prisons. A number of critical factors affect the status of African American boys in early childhood education. They include quality of preschool setting; teacher beliefs, expectations, and behavior; acquisition of early literacy and school readiness skills; and curriculum quality and relevance. In order to address these issues and the broader context of early childhood education for African American boys, a wide range of recommendations are made for consideration by communities and policymakers. (Contains 1 table.)
 
Article
The role of remediation in higher education has generated much debate over the last two decades. While states have enacted policies that reduced or eliminated postsecondary remediation, many policy actors and analysts have not completely acknowledged the ways in which remediation affects college access and success for African American students. This review of research first explains why African American students are disproportionately underprepared for college-level work. Then, the authors summarize the debates concerning the role of remediation in higher education, synthesize the research on the effectiveness of postsecondary remediation, and discuss major and recent policy enactments. They draw implications for the ways in which postsecondary remediation affects Africans American students and offer recommendations for future research and policy.
 
Article
The research literature on families and educational achievement as it addresses African American populations is uniquely characterized by attention to educational failure rather than educational success (Slaughter, Nakagawa, et al., 1990). This orientation originated over 40 years ago with the "culture-as-social-class" conceptual model, which attempts to explain the behavior of lower income African American children and families in encounters with traditional schools (e.g., Davis, 1948). Even the most progressive of contemporary models addressing families and schooling in relation to this population such as those of Ogbu (1974, 1988), Brice-Heath (1988), and Clark (1983) have been compelled to account for the educational failures of urban African American children.
 
Article
This study examines whether participating in competitive policy debate influences high school completion, academic achievement, and college readiness for African American male students. The analysis examines data from the Chicago Debate League from 1997 to 2006. Debate participants were 70% more likely to graduate and three times less likely to drop out as those who did not participate, even after accounting for 8th grade test scores and grade point average. Debate participants were more likely to score at or above the ACT benchmarks for college readiness in English and reading, but not in science or mathematics, than those who did not participate. Recurrent participation in policy debate positively influences scholastic achievement among African American male students in this urban setting. (Contains 1 table and 3 figures.)
 
Article
This guide to rearing African American boys offers simple and effective strategies for problem-solving, improving communication, and instilling a positive racial identity. The book draws on strong African American family values and cultural and spiritual strengths. The chapters are: (1) "You Must Act As If It Is Impossible To Fail: Challenges in Raising African American Teenage Sons"; (2) "If We Stand Tall It Is Because We Stand on the Backs of Those Who Came Before Us: African American Families and the Man Child"; (3) "No One Can Uproot the Tree Which God Has Planted: Spirituality and Religion in Raising Our Sons"; (4) "The Bell Rings Loudest in Your Own Home: Positive Parenting, Love, Communication, and Discipline"; (5) "Education Is Your Passport to the Future, for Tomorrow Belongs to the People Who Prepare for It Today"; (6) "When I Discover Who I Am I'll Be Free: Black Kids in White Schools and Communities"; (7) "Our Future Lies Chiefly in Our Own Hands: The Journey to Manhood and Peer Pressure"; (8) "We Cannot Silence the Voices That We Do Not Like Hearing: Rap, Media Influences, and Hoop Dreams"; (9) "Children Make Foolish Choices When They Have Nothing To Lose: Sex and Sexuality"; (10) "A Man Who Stands for Nothing Will Fall for Anything: Drug and Alcohol Abuse"; (11) "Force against Force Equals More Force: Violence and Gangs"; (12) "If You Are on a Road to Nowhere, Find Another Road: Taking Our Sons Back from the Streets"; (13) "The One Who Asks Questions Doesn't Lose His Way: Getting Past the Fear of Counseling"; and (14) "Keep Your Eyes on the Prize. Hold On: A Parent's Survival Guide." Each chapter contains a list of resources. (SLD)
 
Article
This collection provides many insights into the condition of African American males, emphasizing educational attainment and achievement, and offers methodologies for documenting how the social and educational worlds of African American males intersect. The essays are: (1) "Teaching Black Males: Lessons from the Experts" (Michele Foster and Tryphenia B. Peele); (2) "The Information Rage: Computers and Young African American Males" (Bernard A. Carver); (3) "The Social Construction of High-Incidence Disabilities: The Effect on African American Males" (Beth Harry and Mary G. Anderson); (4) "Identifying Giftedness among African American Males: Recommendations for Effective Recruitment and Retention" (Donna Y. Ford, Tarek C. Grantham, and Deryl F. Bailey); (5) "Who Am I? The Development of the African American Male Identity" (Saladin K. Corbin and Robert L. Pruitt, II); (6) "Responsive Teaching for African American Male Adolescents" (Peter Murrell, Jr.); (7) "Combating Educational Neglect in Suburbia: African American Males and Mathematics" (Vernon C. Polite); (8) "An Absence of a Talented Tenth" (Joseph A. Hawkins); (9) "Ebony Men in the Ivory Tower: A Policy Perspective" (M. Christopher Brown, II); (10) "What Does Gender Have To Do with the Experiences of African American College Men?" (James Earl Davis); (11) "African American Achievement and Socioeconomic Collapse: Alternative Theories and Empirical Evidence" (Patrick L. Mason); (12) "African American Males and the Struggle toward Responsible Fatherhood" (Vivian Gadsden and Phillip J. Bowman); and (13) "A Cup That Runneth Over: Personal Reflections on the Black Male Experience" (Vernon C. Polite). (Contains 553 references.) (SLD)
 
Article
This article reports findings of a study of third-graders' perceptions of school climate, a key variable of the Comer School Development Program. A self-report survey was individually administered to 1,000 African American and 260 Latino children participating in an evaluation of the Comer process; data were factor-analyzed. African American children viewed teacher-child relations as the most important dimension of school climate. For them, besides acknowledging best efforts, caring teachers listened to children and were available to comfort and help with school and personal problems. Latino children stressed teacher fairness, caring, and praise for effort as well as the importance of moral order. Both groups emphasized following school rules and performing well, values consistent with the Comer process.
 
Article
Eighteen years after the Supreme Court rendered its decision in Fordice, many states have complied somewhat or not at all to its mandates. This has been particularly evident in Maryland, where the presidents of historically Black colleges and universities (HBCUs) are pressuring the state to fulfill its commitment with the Office of Civil Rights (OCR), stemming from Fordice, to make HBCUs comparable to their White peers. While Maryland has declared that it has complied with its OCR agreement by preventing unnecessary program duplication between HBCUs and White institutions, investing more money into HBCUs, and increasing racial diversity on all of its public campuses, leaders of the State’s HBCUs charge Maryland with not fully honoring its commitment. In this paper, we will discuss Maryland’s collegiate desegregation plan, stemming from the Supreme Court’s decision—U.S v. Kirk Fordice, and explain the tension resulting from the HBCUs leaders’ accusations of Maryland’s lack of commitment to this agreement.
 
Top-cited authors
Sonia Nieto
  • University of Massachusetts Amherst
Daniel Solorzano
  • University of California, Los Angeles
Donna Y. Ford
  • The Ohio State University
Miguel Ceja
  • California State University, Northridge
Tara J. Yosso
  • University of California, Riverside