The Journal of Marketing Theory and Practice

Published by Taylor & Francis (Routledge)
Online ISSN: 1069-6679
Publications
Article
This longitudinal research examines the impact of individual differences, organizational factors, and contextual influences on intention to adopt and adoption of sales force automation (SFA) technology, and the corresponding effect of adoption on sales performance. Data were collected prior to the introduction of SFA and six months later from 156 salespeople at a major manufacturing firm. In addition to demonstrating that training, customer pressure, and peer use play important roles in SFA adoption, this research is the first to indicate that one's goal orientation also affects adoption behaviors. Beyond examining factors that drive technology adoption, the longitudinal methodology employed in this study provides unique evidence that the adoption of sales technology tools enhances job performance.
 
Article
The study melds the relational view and the environment-strategy-performance perspective to develop a theoretical framework and hypotheses specifying how supply chain partnership strategy as a response to competitive intensity and product complexity may influence operational performance. Empirical findings support the conventional wisdom relating collaboration and operational performance. For firms in industries that market complex products, the study finds =evidence of a direct relationship with all three supply chain strategy factors, i.e., resource specificity, resource complementarity and collaboration. Interestingly, competitive intensity is positively associated with resource specificity, but is negatively associated with the need for resource complementarities. The findings provide an initial strategic response framework for appropriately aligning supply chain strategy with market context factors to achieve operational performance improvements.
 
Article
Businesses have used alliances to share knowledge and resources amongst themselves to achieve corporate goals, yet little is written in the literature on how non-profit organizations manage alliances and what makes these alliances effective. This paper examines how Australian environmental nongovernmental agencies (NGOs) perceive their alliances with other NGOs, profit- based organizations and governmental partners. To a large extent this paper replicates the work of Milne, lyer and (boding-Williams (1996) and includes measures of alliance effectiveness developed by Bucklin and Sengupta (1993). The findings suggest that Australian environmental NGOs use varying mechanisms to manage these alliance relationships, which is generally supported in the existing literature.
 
Path model of fairness-trust-loyalty relationships
Article
Relationship marketing plays a significant role in supply chain practice and academic studies. Using the resource advantage theory within the relationship marketing framework, we studied the mediating role of trust as a governance mechanism in the fairness–loyalty relationship under different types of interdependence structure between suppliers (wholesalers) and buyers (retailers). Our findings, based on data from retail pharmacies, demonstrate that only under conditions of symmetric independence, trust, as a governance mechanism, completely mediate the relationship between fairness and loyalty. Under conditions of both perceived independence (i.e., lack of interdependence) and asymmetric buyer dependence, however, trust does not mediate but fairness directly influences loyalty. Thus, fairness and trust influence loyalty, strengthening relationships in different ways under different conditions of interdependence. The implications for research and practice are discussed.
 
Means, Standard Deviations, and Reliabilities
Article
Ask sales managers and recruiters what they look for in a salesperson, and they will report that they seek competitive, hard-working professionals who match the culture of their company, and research would support the contention that such things generally help the sales organization. But could two of these factors — specifically, trait competitiveness and working long hours — be associated with counterproductive sales behavior? This research examines the effect of trait competitiveness, hours worked, and person–organization fit on the three forms of deviant salesperson behavior (organizational deviance, interpersonal deviance, and frontline deviance) and, in addition to testing these main effects, investigates whether managers can attenuate these relationships by investing time explaining the meaningfulness of the salesperson’s job to the salesperson. Using survey data collected from 160 business-to-business salespeople from multiple companies and multiple industries, results support five of seven hypothesized main effects as well as three of four hypothesized interactions. The research concludes with an analysis of the findings, a discussion of their managerial implications, and suggestions for future scholarly inquiry.
 
Article
This paper conceptualizes the notion of "consumer disposition toward satisfaction" (CDS), defined as the consumer's general tendency to be sufficiently satisfied with the purchase and consumption of the goods and services they utilize. Furthermore, the development and validation of the Consumer Disposition toward Satisfaction (CDS) Scale is detailed. The scale development process was carried out over three stages (item generation, scale purification, scale validation), which comprised of 8 separate data collections, involving a total of 1514 individual respondents. As such, the data provide evidence for face, content, criterion-related, discriminant and convergent validity, dimensionality, reliability and generalizability of the CDS scale. The CDS scale is a unidimensional, parsimonious scale that has the potential for significant usage in the development and testing of theory, as well as in practical applications.
 
Article
Despite the plethora of consumer behavior and social psychology literature on consumer involvement, no common conceptual or methodological framework is evident in either literature. The paper presents an exegesis of the consumer involvement construct through a meta-analysis of extant literature and an empirical investigation in five European countries, where food is selected as an appropriate application. The findings show that four of the five most commonly observed dimensions of involvement remain robust, suggesting the four-factor involvement model might have universal meaning. Finally, the conceptual and operational clarification of the construct proposes a more precise context in which it should be placed for predictive analysis.
 
Article
This research investigates relationships among organizational strategic orientations, namely, entrepreneurial, technological, and proactive market orientations and their effects on new product development (NPD) program performance. Employing a sample of 183 U.S. technology based companies, the study evaluates three possible models, and shows positive effects of technological and proactive market orientations on entrepreneurial orientation. Results also show a positive effect of entrepreneurial orientation on NPD program performance. This study explains the importance of various strategic orientations and underscores the importance of converting firm strategic orientations into NPD program performance.
 
Article
This study compares the ethical perceptions of White and Hispanic consumers (n=259) in two different urban areas in two different states in the Southwestern United States with regard to 14 questionable retail practices. In addition to examining the culture of the subjects and cultural proximity to the merchant, demographics of income and gender were included. ANOV A routines indicate that Hispanics, women, and those with lower incomes are less tolerant of the questionable practices Studiesd (p=.05 or lower). Cultural proximity to the merchant had no effect.
 
Article
The existing literature strongly supports the notion that consumer perceptions of service quality, consumer satisfaction, and service value are fundamentally linked to organizational strategies and performance. In continuing this important research stream, Quinn (1992) recently presents a paradigm of service-firm strategies which shows great promise for incorporation in marketing-based strategic research. However, a limitation in the applicability of Quinn’s (1992) paradigm involves how service quality is conceptualized and operationalized in the development of the paradigm. The outcome of this limitation may be an inability to adequately capture the domains of not only service quality, but also consumer satisfaction and value in marketing models based on Quinn’s paradigm. The following paper reconciles Quinn’s (1992) paradigm with the emerging marketing-based service quality and satisfaction literatures through the development of a conceptual model of consumer decision-making in service environments. Marketing researchers and practitioners are urged to consider Quinn’s (1992) paradigm in light of the proposed model.
 
Article
Cooke, Rayburn, and Abercrombie (1992) use historical definitions of marketing to define four major schools of marketing thought. These four schools include the (1) economic utility viewpoint, (2) consumer viewpoint, (3) societal viewpoint, and (4) managerial viewpoint. We suggest that the 2004 AMA definition of marketing creates an additional school of marketing thought, the stakeholder viewpoint. In addition, for over four decades, researchers have used market orientation scales to operationalize what it means for a firm to follow the marketing concept. While the conceptualisation of a market orientation has remained static, the definition of marketing has changed quite dramatically. Few authors have revisited original scale properties and none have addressed the central question of what it means for an organization to be market oriented in the context of the 2004 AMA definition of marketing. As a consequence, market orientation scales have been used sometimes with little consideration as to their relevance. Given changes in the AMA definition of marketing, changes to market characteristics, changes in our understanding of competitive behavior and advances in management theory and scale development, this paper calls for a new scale or scales to be developed that more fully captures the market orientation construct in the context of the 2004 AMA definition of marketing and the “stakeholder” perspective of marketing thought.
 
Article
This paper focuses on the perceived impact of two legislative changes (elimination of tariffs and intrastate deregulation) affecting the trucking industry that were signed by President Clinton in August of 1994. These legislative changes are generally seen as a completion of the 1980 Motor Carrier Act that deregulated interstate truck freight. Two surveys were conducted with a similar sample, one in the fall of 1994 and another in the fall of 1997 to determine the impact of this further deregulation on rural shippers. The results suggest that the impact on freight costs, service, and safety is viewed as being very positive. Deregulation permits carriers greater flexibility in meeting shippers needs, thus contributing in a positive way to achieving supply chain management goals.
 
Article
Consumer behaviors such as compUlsive buying and status consumption have potentially negative consequences for both individuals and society. This study represents are-inquiry of Rindfleisch, Burroughs, and Denton’s (1997) study concerning the impact of family structure on materialism and compUlsive buying. In addition to using a sample of Mexican adolescents and young adults, the present study further extends the work of Rindfleisch et al. by assessing the impact of other family environment variables that may mediate or moderate the effects of changes in family structure (due to divorce, separation, or death) on compulsive buying. We find strong direct relationships between family structure and compulsive buying. Support is also found for several variables that mediate the family structure - compulsive buying relationship: status consumption, intangible family resources, and parental yielding. The study’s findings have significant implications for furthering our understanding ofhow family structure impacts consumer behavior. Directions for future research in this nascent area of inquiry are offered.
 
Article
A descriptive history reveals the strategic interest in the young manifested by the cigarette industry from 1920 to the present. The tobacco and advertising trade presses, FTC records and recently disclosed corporate documents display and discuss the targeting of adolescents and collegians. They also document the rationale and results of media choices, the use of cartoons, and especially the use of images of independence to appeal to the psychological need of adolescents. The implications for both the private sector and public policy are discussed, given this persistent targeting of youth and failure of regulation to curtail most of these tactics.
 
Article
As the global marketplace has become a reality, the need to expand the traditional marketing concept has become apparent.A supporting infrastructure, the marketing support system, broadens the basic 4P’s by adding an additional 5P’s, e.g., publics, performance, politics, probability and planning. The newly conceptualized marketing concept should assist marketeers in the 21 st Century.
 
A Conceptual Framework of 4A Mix Practices in Emerging Markets 
Respondents and Organization Profile 
Article
This study evaluates the applicability of the 4As marketing mix activities (i.e., affordability, accessibility, acceptability, and awareness) in emerging market conditions, using Ghana as the empirical context. Two-thirds of firms in the sample report medium-to-high use of all the 4As. Only affordability and accessibility marketing mix activities lead to market share performance (demand aggregation advantage), while all 4A activities lead to financial performance. Further, the regulatory environment moderates the relationship between affordability and market share performance. Thus, the study results suggest that emerging markets firms emphasize different components of the 4A marketing mix for optimal effectiveness.
 
Article
This paper evaluates Jerome McCarthy’s 4Ps paradigm from an historical and philosophical perspective. Since its introduction in 1960, McCarthy’s paradigm has been widely used as a pedagogical tool by academics and practitioners, but it has also been a frequent target of academic critics. The authors review criticisms of the 4Ps paradigm and conclude that it has proven to be sufficiently robust for contemporary marketing applications. That is, the 4Ps paradigm is time-tested! It is as valuable for 1990s’ professors, students and managers as it was in 1960.
 
Article
Building on an in-depth content analysis of letters to shareholders in the annual reports of 54 Fortune 500 firms, this study examines the types of marketing information currently being highlighted to stakeholders external to the firm. The study identifies seven types of marketing assets: customer relationships, other value network relationships, societal relationships, reputational assets, marketing information, offering-related assets, and market position. The study also reveals three distinct profiles of firms’ reporting. The findings shed empirical light on aspects of marketing that diverse firms perceive as meriting disclosure to external stakeholders, thereby providing insights into how senior management perceives marketing.
 
Article
Software upgrades are unique “modular” products in that they are neither new nor are they repeat purchases. This study sought to identify consumer attributes related to their upgrading likelihood for word processing and spreadsheet software used at home. Surveys incorporating questions related to the study were given to a sample of individual consumers. Individuals more likely to upgrade software tended to be those who 1) attached symbolic or status value to upgrading, 2) perceived themselves to be software experts, or 3) found the upgraded software to be of great value relative to the cost of upgrading. Females showed a greater inclination to upgrade than males. Managerial implications of these findings for targeting, segmentation, positioning, and promotion are also discussed.
 
Article
Discussions of the validity and desire for AACSB accreditation generally become discussions of the seeming dichotomies of teaching and research. As a rule, the conversations are teaching vs. research, instead of teaching and research. The overwhelming assumption seems to be that the requirements for AACSB accreditation are so stringent that little academic time remains for effective teaching. The purpose of this research is to examine recent results of the AACSB accreditation process and compare the type and quantity of research performed at universities which were accredited by the AACSB and those that were denied accreditation. The results of the research generally indicate that the AACSB requirements do not seem so stringent as to preclude teaching. Instead, the study indicates that a focused effort by Colleges of Business and their faculties on journal publications is the strategy most likely to lead to AACSB accreditation.
 
Article
This content analysis compares and contrasts children’s cognitive development with how advertisers present their information to children. Basic fmdings include that advertisers appear to be sensitive to the need to present information in different ways to different age groups but that they attempt to present too much information in ads aimed at younger children. Advertisers consistently show the package prominently, an important need for young children, and they also use at least one of the proved attention-getters of rhyming, music, and singing in all of the preschool children’s ads.
 
Article
Private label brand research is characterized by both increasing quantity and quality. While recent work provides a very useful high-level overview (e.g., Kumar and Steenkamp 2007) and several sophisticated studies persuasively address specific aspects, managers and academics will benefit from "good" (Barwise 1995) empirical generalizations that guide practice as well as stimulate consolidation of otherwise segregated hypotheses and empirical observations into mid-range theories (Merton 1968). This paper reports the aggregation and assessment of 142 sources and the development of empirical generalizations for this important domain.
 
Article
Accrediting agencies and industry are calling for more relevant, impactful research. Biennially, the Marketing Science Institute (MSI) releases research priorities representing important problems in marketing from a practitioner perspective. This study identifies the topics most emphasized by MSI and major marketing journals, assessing synergy of focus. Employing text analytics, MSI’s relative interest in various marketing topics is compared to the topical focus found in journals.While covering the same topics, findings suggest a difference in the allocation of focus on each topic between industry and prominent marketing journals. The ramifications of this disconnect include reduced relevance of academic research.
 
Article
This research examines the issues that impede the development of robust academic analysis of popular managerial practices and metrics using the case of the Net Promoter Score/System (NPS). The issues identified include limited academic access to the original methodology/data underlying a managerial practice, different vocabularies used by academics and practitioners, the inability of academics to disprove unfalsifiable claims, and the lack of any precise specification of theory. Finally, academics’ failure to pay detailed attention to dependent variables leads to confused messages being sent to managers. We offer recommendations to overcome these issues.
 
Article
The technology acceptance model (TAM) is arguably one of the most widely used models for studying user adoption in the information systems discipline and has started to be used increasingly within the marketing area. While two of its three main hypotheses have received consistent empirical support, the same is not true for the remaining relationship (i.e., the influence of perceived ease of use on the behavioral intention to adopt a system; PEOU-BI). Previously, this empirical contradiction has been explained by introducing the concept of task motivation borrowed from Davis, Bagozzi, and Warshaw (1992). Our paper provides a different explanation. We show that for the same task (and, hence, the same task motivation), the significance can also depend on observed population heterogeneity. We do this by applying partial least squares (PLS) structural equation modeling (SEM) to data stemming from a survey among approximately 2,000 individuals regarding their intention to adopt a customized newspaper. Our findings result in the following three contributions: first, our results provide an alternative explanation for the inconsistent empirical support of the PEOU—BI link within the TAM. Second, we provide a methodological contribution by proposing an approach to control for gamma change when analyzing moderating effects using PLS analysis. Third, our study highlights the importance of conducting a statistical power analysis in order to determine critical t-values in the context of a PLS path analysis.
 
Article
This article studies the impact of firm instituted referral reward programs on consumers’ acceptance of word of mouth recommendations. Across a series of three experiments, we show that recommendation acceptance is dependent upon the nature of the referral reward and the interpersonal tie-strength between the recommender and recipient. Results demonstrate that when a strong tie exists between the recommender and recipient, consumers are just as likely to take a recommendation when a referral reward is present as when a referral reward is absent. However, when a weak tie exists, consumers are more likely to take a recommendation when a referral reward is absent than when a referral reward is present. Finally, we examine the role that different referral reward designs play in influencing recommendation acceptance and show that the design of a referral reward program is critical.
 
Article
The rapid development of technological platforms, coupled with changes in consumer preferences, has fueled the rise of collaborative consumption. The present research employs a multi-method approach to examine consumer motivations to engage in collaborative consumption. Consumer profiles for collaborative consumption are developed, followed by an experiment that examines the role of consumer self-image congruence with platforms and workers. The results suggest that firms should prime consumers on similarities that they may share as self-image congruence mediates the relationship with both platforms and workers. This research develops consumer profiles for collaborative consumption engagement across multiple platforms and provides relevant managerial implications.
 
Ownership versus access-based consumption characteristics.
Access-based consumption conceptual model.
Qualitative study participants.
Respondent profiles.
Measurement model results.
Article
Consumer decision-making is a focal interest of consumer research and will remain important as marketplace trends, such as the growing prevalence of access-based consumption, continue to evolve. Access-based consumption provides market-mediated transactions where no transfer of ownership takes place. First, a qualitative study explores the differences that arise from viewing decision-making from the perspective of access rather than ownership. Additionally, a multi-group structural model seeks to provide further insights into the variations in decision-making for product access versus purchase. Findings of this research suggest access-based consumption decisions differ from ownership decisions based on choice strategy, choice commitment, ownership commitment, valuation of choice and post-purchase evaluation.
 
Article
The world of selling and sales management has changed dramatically in the past decade. Sales organizations face amore complex work environment marked by increasing customer expectations, frequent significant change, increasingly complex buying situations, and more diversity in their customer bases. Collaboration, both internal and external, is crucial in today’s sales environment More than ever, sales organizations, sales managers, and salespeople are accountable for their behavior and performance outcomes. Using the three themes of complexity, collaboration, and accountability, this paper discusses related managerial responses and future research opportunities.
 
Article
Given the stressful nature of sales jobs, research has historically emphasized the importance of reducing exhaustion for promoting desired salesperson job outcomes. Building on data provided by 235 B2B salespeople, this study finds that while reducing exhaustion is important, enhancing engagement may be more critical. Specifically, the results reveal that engagement mediates the effects of customer orientation, training, and supervisor support on sales performance, but exhaustion does not. Furthermore, the results indicate that exhaustion and engagement both mediate the effects of supervisor support on turnover intentions. Implications of the study’s findings for theory and practice are discussed.
 
Article
The objective of this study is to examine antecedents as well as consequences of mobile wallet usage for achieving the ultimate consequence of “intention to recommend to use” by brick and mortar retailers. The model incorporates attitude and subjective norms leading to perceived usefulness and usage intention for mobile wallets. It also reveals perceived cost having a negative impact and perceived trust having a positive impact on usage intention toward mobile wallets. The study was conducted on small brick and mortar retailers. Statistical techniques such as reliability, validity and mediation analyses were conducted to test the hypothesized model, using SPSS Macro Process Hayes. Results indicate a positive impact of intention to use on user’s tendency to recommend mobile wallets. This study provides valuable insights and a strategic direction for mobile wallet service providers and also government regulators, to prepare a holistic framework to enhance adoption and usage of the wallets among retailers and traders. This is a relatively under explored demographic with reference to mobile wallets. It explains, in totality, various facets of behavior of retailers, with reference to mobile wallets. A unique contribution of this research to the extant literature on mobile wallet adoption and usage is that it is based on the Theory of Reasoned Action (TRA) and extends TRA by adding “intention to recommend” as a logical consequence of “usage intention” for mobile wallets.
 
Article
The purpose of this study was to determine whether voters' attitudes toward political ads are moderated by their level of political involvement. Two studies were conducted, both during national and state elections. The results were consistent. Low-involvement voters view political ads in general, and negative "attack" ads in particular, more favorably than do individuals who are highly involved with politics. In contrast, voters who are highly involved with politics are more skeptical of political ads, even those that promote their preferred candidate. As a result, among high-involvement individuals, the use of attack ads might be counterproductive.
 
Article
This article reports the results of a field experiment conducted to assess the results of acknowledgement programs used by an educational institution. A two-year study of the giving patterns of 732 subjects revealed that more frequent communication with donors had a negative effect on their future giving behavior and the useof personal appeals had a positive effect on the size of their donations. Post-hoc analysis revealed that personal appeals had a greater effect on older alumni and alumni with a shorter history of giving. These results indicate that institutions should customize their solicitation programs to the needs of targeted segments.
 
Article
Using social identification theory, the current research examines complaining behavior of services consumers of African descent in Brazil, South Africa, and the United States. The common trait of African ancestry and its association with the types of responses to dissatisfied marketplace experiences, including no action, informal action, or more formal complaint behaviors is explored. Findings indicate that country of residence differences interact with the common African ancestral trait, resulting in an assorted range of complaint-related responses. Finally, implications for marketing concept and practice are discussed.
 
Article
In two studies, consumer values, personality traits, and responses to various advertising appeals were examined for intergenerational differences between Baby Boomers and Generation Y. As hypothesized, Gen Y consumers displayed higher levels of materialism and brand-signaling importance, and lower levels of religiosity than did Baby Boomers. Gen Y consumers also showed higher levels of self-monitoring and lower levels of dispositional guilt and empathic concern. With respect to advertising appeals, Gen Y consumers reported more positive attitudes toward image, extravagance, sex, and greed appeals than did Baby Boomers. Practical implications of these findings and ideas for future research are presented.
 
Article
This research compares the extent to which sales personnel in B2C (business-to-consumer) and B2B (business-to-business) markets use relationship-oriented social media to accomplish job-related and selling process (i.e., social CRM [customer relationship management]) tasks. A sample of 395 sales professionals across a variety of industries responded to questions assessing their use of the tools. Results demonstrate that a substantial proportion find utility in the applications. Interaction effects regarding B2B managers are particularly noteworthy, as no prior research has shown that B2B managers are significantly and far more engaged with social CRM than other sales representatives. The frequency and extent of social CRM usage varies based on the specific tools used and the stage of the selling process. The findings carry important implications for salespeople, managers, trainers, and university educators.
 
Article
As a means to assist purchasing managers in formulating and implementing more timely and effective procurement strategies across a product’s sales cycle, the authors synthesize, substantially expand, and update previous Product Life Cycle (PLC)purchasing strategy (PS) models by presenting 210 PSs classified according to five PLC stages and seventeen intradepartmental, interdepartmental, and external relations. By depicting procurement in a systems perspective, the authors’ model makes explicit purchasing’s relationship with other functions of the firm in the decision-making process. This is especially opportune, because procurement is currently assuming top-management stature in many firms. Managerial and research implications are discussed.
 
Freytag's Pyramid
Article
Grounded in dramatic theory, this study presents an expanded model of dramatic form for empirical investigation of television commercials. A two-year content analysis of 108 commercials found significant association of dramatic form with consumer favorability in Super Bowl advertising rating polls. Results demonstrated that average consumer ratings were higher for commercials that followed a five-act dramatic form and a positive association of the number of acts in commercials with consumer favorability ratings. The paper discusses the relationship of five-act plot development with advertising function as well as the theoretical implications of narrative theory and its impact on consumer response.
 
Article
This paper advances a theory of persuasion in marketing based on behavioral (rather than attitudinal) change. It considers fundamental conceptual issues, comparisons with other theories of persuasion, potential for marketing applications, and suggestions for future research.
 
Article
Great potential remains unused in e-tailing because of consumers' general lack of trust in e-tailers. This study is focused on the comprehensive identification of trust-enhancing, and therefore success-enhancing, Web site signals. The main research goal is a comparison of their efficiency regarding the building of a trust-based intention to transact—identifying the managerial tactics with which to convert Web site visitors into buyers. By adopting a signal typology and analyzing a structural equation model with partial least squares, followed by an importance-performance analysis, particular signals, which already require investments at an early point in the business activity, are revealed to have a potential to establish a competitive advantage in e-tailing.
 
Article
Human trafficking’s most authoritative definitions suffer from internal inconsistencies and exploitation creep. This difficulty has caused all trafficking, rather than only its worst forms, to be categorized as slavery. We use victims’ voluntary, semivoluntary, and involuntary participation in human trafficking marketing channels and their related attitude-behavior consistencies to redefine human trafficking. This definition forms the conceptual foundation for a victim typology matrix, within which Frazier and Sheth’s (1985) influence strategies prescribe interventions. A sample of 190 United Nations’ cases supports the typology, and Chi-Square test results indicate a statistically strong relationship between the conditions under which victims enter and remain in human trafficking channels.
 
Article
A relationship exists between the supply chain and marketing activities.For most supply chains a balance exists between customer requirements and supply chain capabilities. When marketing activities strain the supply chain’s ability to meet demand,additional costs are incurred. All associated costs should be considered in supply chain planning, and marketing initiatives should be evaluated including the recognition of these costs across the supply chain. Questions related to the timing of marketing activities need to consider the impact on the supply chain and the overall profitability of the initiative.
 
Article
Counterproductive Work Behaviors (CWBs) are based on the harm, or intended harm, they cause to organizations and or stakeholders (Spector and Fox 2005), while sales deviance is based on the violation of organizational norms (Robinson and Bennet 1995). Utilizing the definitional difference, this article explores a gap in the sales deviance literature that allows for potentially unidentified intentionally harmful behaviors that do not violate organizational norms, to exist. In addition, we propose strategic motivations for such behavior. Results suggest that motivations include long-term attitudes toward CWBs, moral obligation, consensus beliefs, productive equity, self-image congruence, and impression management.
 
Article
Leveraging Bagozzi’s (1992) appraisal framework, this research contributes to our understanding of the effects of demarketing. In particular, it examines the impact of a proenvironmental demarketing effort which calls attention to potential electricity saving ideas, on perceptions, and consumption. A pair of cross-validated studies indicates that proenvironmental demarketing may enhance consumers’ perceptions of the firm and subsequently affect consumption behavior. Specifically, study one suggests that proenvironmental demarketing leads to enhanced perception of an organization’s trustworthiness, market orientation, and environmental-sensitivity, while study two indicates that proenvironmental demarketing may lead to a reduction in electricity consumption.
 
Top-cited authors
Christian M. Ringle
  • Technische Universität Hamburg
Marko Sarstedt
  • Ludwig-Maximilians-University of Munich
Ronald E. Goldsmith
  • Florida State University
Sharon Beatty
  • University of Alabama
Shiri D. Vivek
  • Eastern Michigan University