The International Journal of African Historical Studies

Online ISSN: 0361-7882
Publications
Article
L'A. se propose d'identifier un certain nombre de questions critiques posees par l'explosion de la video en Afrique contemporaine afin d'explorer egalement l'histoire a plus long terme de la communication de masse comme vehicule des activites de loisir. Il centre notamment son analyse sur la constitution historique des differentes audiences, explorant l'interaction entre les aspirations au plaisir et au divertissement des publics africains, le desir des entrepreneurs de faire de l'argent, et les preoccupations des autorites de maintenir l'ordre social. La diffusion rapide, dans les dernieres decennies, de la television et des magnetoscopes a cree les conditions economiques et sociales pour l'emergence d'une industrie video locale, et les petits studios se sont multiplies en Afrique Occidentale et en Afrique du Sud.
 
Article
This academic history of diamond mining in Kimberley is a major study of the beginning of South Africa’s mineral revolution. It includes the first analysis of the formation of De Beers Consolidated Mines, one of the most successful companies ever to have been established in Africa. Based on documentary sources, notably in the Standard Bank Archive, the Rothschild Archive and the Philipson Stow Papers, it includes an interpretation of the Black Flag Revolt and of the celebrated amalgamation struggle between Cecil Rhodes and Barney Barnato for the control of the diamond-mining industry. It also contains a narrative and analysis of strikes in mines in South Africa and an extended treatment of the social and economic structure of illicit diamond buying. But at its heart lies the introduction of the compound system and the structural explanation of the role played by this institution in the accummulation of diamond-mining capital.
 
Book
In Market Institutions in Sub-Saharan Africa, Marcel Fafchamps synthesizes the results of recent surveys of indigenous market institutions in twelve countries, including Benin, Ghana, Kenya, Madagascar, Malawi, and Zimbabwe, and presents findings about economics exchange in Africa that have implications both for future research and current policy. Employing empirical data as well as theoretical models that clarify the data, Fafchamps takes as his unifying principle the difficulties of contract enforcement. Arguing that in an unpredictable world contracts are not always likely to be respected, he shows that contract agreements in sub-Saharan Africa are affected by the absence of large hierarchies (both corporate and governmental) and as a result must depend to a greater degree than in more developed economies on social networks and personal trust. Fafchamps considers policy recommendations as they apply to countries in three different stages of development: countries with undeveloped market institutions, like Ghana; countries at an intermediate stage, like Kenya; and countries with developed market institutions, like Zimbabwe. Market Institutions in Sub-Saharan Africa caps ten years of personal research by the author. Fafchamps, in collaboration with such institutions as the Africa Division of the World Bank and the International Food Policy Research Institute, participated in the surveys of manufacturing firms and agricultural traders that provide the empirical basis for the book. The result is a work that makes a significant contribution to research on the continuing economic stagnation of many countries in sub-Saharan Africa and is also largely accessible to researchers in other fields and policy professionals.
 
Book
A single theme is pursued in this book - the trade between peoples of differing cultures through world history. Extending from the ancient world to the coming of the commercial revolution, Professor Curtin’s discussion encompasses a broad and diverse group of trading relationships. Drawing on insights from economic history and anthropology, Professor Curtin has attempted to move beyond a Europe-centred view of history, to one that can help us understand the entire range of societies in the human past. Examples have been chosen that illustrate the greatest variety of trading relationships between cultures. The opening chapters look at Africa, while subsequent chapters treat the ancient world, the Mediterranean trade with China, the Asian trade in the east, and European entry into the trade with maritime Asia, the Armenian trade carriers of the seventeenth century, and the North American fur trade. Wide-ranging in its concern and the fruit of exhaustive research, the book is nevertheless written so as to be accessible and stimulating to the specialist and the student alike.
 
Book
This book gives an account of the political economy of Tanzania, tracing the historical processes by which the country developed from pre-colonial trade in slaves and ivory, through German and then British colonial rule, to take its place in the international economy.
 
Article
Thesis (M.A.)--University of Cape Town, 1985.
 
Article
Incl. bibliographical references
 
Article
Overview of climate changes and ecological zones and their relation to the history of West Africa.
 
Article
Thèse 3ème cycle Hist. sociol., Paris, E.P.H.E., VI⁰ sec., 1968.
 
Article
Thesis (Ph. D.)--University of London, 1975. Microfilm.
 
Article
BLDSC reference no.: D4955/74. Thesis (D. Phil.)--University of Oxford, 1969. Bibliography: leaves 499-533.
 
Article
Photocopy of typescript. Ann Arbor, Mich., University Microfilms, 1975, 21 cm. Vita. Thesis--University of Wisconsin, 1974. Bibliography: leaves 236-258.
 
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