Sociology and Social Research

Online ISSN: 0038-0393
Publications
Article
The main objective of this paper is to use the Iranian case to test three hypotheses about the demographic, religious, and socioeconomic differences between immigrants and political refugees or exiles, which are commonly found in the literature. These hypotheses are tested by using data from the 1980 U.S. Census Public Use Microdata Sample for the 1975-80 and the pre-1975 Iranian immigrant cohorts. Our first hypothesis is that the 1975-80 immigrants include a higher proportion of religious minorities than the pre-1975 immigrants. Our second hypothesis is that the 1975-1980 cohort, composed of a large number of refugees, is much more balanced with respect to age and sex distribution than the pre-1975 cohort. The third hypothesis is that Iranians who arrived in 1975-80 had a higher socioeconomic achievement than those who came before that date. The analysis of data from the 1980 U.S. Census on immigration cohorts is preceded by a brief review of trends and types of Iranian immigration to the United States as documented by tabulations from the INS. While these tabulations pertain only to the United States, they also reflect immigration trends to Los Angeles, since this metropolitan area is the favored destination of Iranian immigrants to the United States.
 
Article
Proceeding from human ecological assumptions, this paper examines how variation in basic community dimensions affects the level and distribution of family income in metropolitan communities. A path model is presented which views income level and inequality as caused by ecological structure (age, racial composition, and regional location), industry mix (manufacturing and agricultural employment), and human capital factors (educational inequality and female labor force participation). Data for the total, White, and non-White populations of 197 standard metropolitan statistical areas in 1960 are used in 3 parallel path analyses. The overall results demonstrate the utility of the ecological approach in explaining inequality. Considerable differences by color are found: Roughly 74% of the intercommunity variation in income inequality for all families, 80% for Whites, and 17% for non-Whites are explained statistically. Regional location and median family income are of primary importance, and racial exploitation has a measurable effect. (24 ref) (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved)
 
Article
Reviews the literature on "going steady" among American youth and explored the going-steady practices of 472 seniors in 6 Connecticut high schools to assess the degree to which they have changed during the past 20 yrs. Areas that have been previously ignored, such as students' conception of going steady are also addressed. Findings suggest that going steady has assumed a more central place in the social life of high school students than in the past, and for most Ss, going steady was not marriage oriented. Ss who went steady were generally more oriented toward heterosexual socializing than were those who did not; however, few other distinctions between the 2 groups emerged. Results indicate that students who planned to marry their current steady differed from those who did not in a number of ways. The general profile of the person who planned to marry a current steady was a White female without college plans who came from a relatively low-SES family, as measured by father's occupational ranking and mother's education. (22 ref) (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved)
 
Article
Surveyed 698 adults from high-crime neighborhoods in Toledo, Ohio, by telephone to determine their support for organized vigilante action against crime, specifically the Guardian Angels (GAs). Data suggest that Ss were likely to welcome patrols by the GAs. Men were slightly more supportive than women, and low-income Ss were slightly more supportive than high-income Ss. Data are consistent with R. M. Brown's (1969) interpretation of vigilantism as drawing support from areas of greatest risk of victimization. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved)
 
Article
Evaluated 2 psychologically-based and 2 sociologically-based treatment programs serving 60 lower-class, persistently offending delinquent boys (44 nonwhite, 16 white). The psychological programs consisted of casework with the youths and their families; the sociological offered educational development and job placement. Results indicate that the sociological programs were significantly more effective than the casework programs in reducing recidivism, enabling more of the delinquents to enter the "opportunity structure" (regular employment after high school). This entry was accompanied by improved self-images and identification with more "traditional" reference groups. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved)
 
Article
Criticizes strain theory as proposed by R. Merton (1938), A. Cohen (1955), and R. Cloward and L. Ohlin (1960) and presents a revised theory that focuses on the immediate rather than long-term goals of adolescents and recognizes that adolescents may pursue a variety of goals rather than a single one. It was hypothesized that delinquency should be greatest among adolescents who are unable to achieve all or most of their immediate goals; these adolescents may turn to delinquency to either achieve their goals through illegitimate channels or vent their frustration. The revised strain theory was tested using a national sample of 1,886 10th-grade boys included in the Youth in Transition Survey (J. Bachman et al, 1978) who reported their academic, intellectual, student activity, athletic, affiliation, independence, and success goals and goal achievements. Results indicate that Ss who were achieving only a few important goals were no more likely to be delinquent than Ss who achieved all of their important goals. Limitations of the revised strain theory and directions for future delinquency research are discussed in light of the lack of support for a relationship between goal achievement and delinquency among adolescents. (38 ref) (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved)
 
Article
Results of a study of brazilian students, workers, and housewives support previous findings on the liberality of students compared with nonstudent populations and the greater conservation of students in technical fields. Data show that (a) students in this sample tended to be either similar or more liberal than their fathers; (b) age and conservatism reflected no change in the worker population; and (c) marked contrasts existed between similarly aged workers and students, with students being far more radical. Findings are related to the role of education in the development of radical movements in brazil. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved)
 
Article
REPORTS ON THE DRINKING PATTERNS OF A SAMPLE OF HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS IN A MISSISSIPPI COMMUNITY. REVEALS, IN GENERAL, THAT THE USE OF ALCOHOL BY STUDENTS IN MISSISSIPPI IS RELATED TO THE SAME PERSONAL AND SOCIAL FACTORS AS REPORTED IN PREVIOUS STUDIES. HOWEVER, THE DATA INDICATE THAT THE STUDENTS WHO DRINK RUN SOME RISK IN THEIR USE OF ALCOHOL AND ARE EXHIBITING SIGNS THAT NORMALLY ARE ASSOCIATED WITH PROBLEM DRINKING. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved)
 
Article
50 maritally adjusted and 50 maritally unadjusted middle-class couples were compared with respect to their perceptions of themselves as husbands and wives to discover the relationship between role perception and marital happiness. The 2 groups could be differentiated with respect to both self perceptions and mate perceptions on the dominance-submission and hostility-affectional dimensions. Congruence of perception was significantly related to the husbands' and couples' marital adjustment score, but not to the wives' adjustment score. Adjusted spouses perceived themselves as having similar role attitudes which are in conformity with cultural ideals and norms. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved)
 
Article
Hypothesized that individuals who prefer violent TV shows will perceive more crime and react more defensively to protect themselves from that crime than individuals who choose less violent shows. In addition, it was predicted that these effects would be greater for those people who did not only watch but also perceive their favorite shows as violent. Data from Ss in Grades 7-12 give only weak support to these hypotheses. Several reasons for the weak relationships are discussed. (16 ref) (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved)
 
Article
Reports the incidence and patterning of admitted misconduct within age and sex classifications. Sex ratios in most instances are found to be less than those derived from official statistics. Patterns of age differences in misconduct are found to complement differential age role definitions. Additional male age differences are analyzed in terms of the establishment of adult masculine identity. (32 ref.) (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved)
 
Article
Examined sex-based differences in sentencing, using data from 3 populations—263 community members, 189 college students, and 128 prison inmates. Ss selected the type of punishment they felt appropriate for crimes committed by a man or those described as committed by a woman. The responses of these Ss were compared to actual criminal sentences handed out to male and female defendants. Female defendants were found to receive lighter sentences, both by all Ss and according to actual court records, although the preference was of small magnitude. This may be related to 5 factors: practicality, chivalry, expectations of conformity, future criminality, and perception of greater danger and fear. (48 ref) (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved)
 
Article
In a current study of the role outlook of educated women, the hypothesis is tested that college girls who aspire to given adult role constellations resemble in sex-role conception adult women who actually perform these role constellations. Thus, girls who hope to be working mothers should have scores on 1 measure of sex-role conception (attitudes about husband-wife relations) similar to those of married alumnae who are working; girls aspiring to be full-time homemakers should not differ significantly in sex-role conception. Both samples were comparable in social class level, college major, place of residence, and grades. The hypothesis was borne out in that the work- and home-aspiring freshmen indeed did not differ significantly from their respective alumnae in sex role ideology scores. But it was found that neither do the alumnae role groups differ—full time homemakers view husband-wife relations in the same way as working wives; further, the freshmen taken together resemble the entire alumnae sample. (27 ref.) (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved)
 
Article
There has been recent debate over the possible emergence and potential effects of a subculture of the aged. The present paper argues that aging group consciousness has several beneficial effects upon older people and that such subcultural feelings emerge from interaction with age peers. Interviews were conducted with 323 community aged (over age 60). There was a positive relationship between aging group consciousness and self-esteem, but only for those who identified themselves as "elderly." This is attributed to reference group comparisons rather than true subcultural emergence. Subcultural feelings were not widespread and were related to group interaction with age peers. Implications of these findings are discussed relating to the possibility of further subcultural development. (3½ p ref) (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved)
 
Article
A survey of 375 undergraduates on their beliefs concerning the transmission of acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) indicated that the term "casual contact" may not be a unidimensional variable and may provoke confusion when used in education campaigns. Most Ss feared contamination from "wet" contact (e.g., kissing, sharing a glass). (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved)
 
Article
Uses surveys from the Survey Research Center's (University of Michigan) Presidential election studies to examine the hypothesis that the politically alienated develop negativistic orientations toward politics and political figures. This negativism syndrome is identified with voting "against," "protest voting," an inability to perceive important policy differences between the major parties, and diffuse hostility toward all politicians. These orientations, in turn, are said to intervene between alienation and its political effects. In contrast, the data show that the attitudes of powerlessness and distrust are not related to elements of negativism. (49 ref) (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved)
 
Article
Investigated the development of political alienation in 400 young Mexican children in Grades 2-9 living in the Federal District, a main modernizing sector. Respondents displayed substantial erosion of support for the political authorities and the political regime; at the same time, however, their loyalty to Mexico, that is, their diffuse support offered at the level of political community, remained unaffected by the extensive alienation recorded at the levels of regime and authorities. Moreover, this alienation was more pronounced for upper-status children, a finding that contrasts with patterns of political socialization in other political cultures but one which is consistent with the nature of the Mexican political culture. It is suggested that such alienation may ultimately be disruptive of the political system so long as new generations are increasingly exposed to democratic rhetoric but not given the opportunity to meaningfully participate in the governance process. (29 ref) (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved)
 
Article
Studied theories relating to alienation on the job and feeling of self-estrangement in 80 white collar bank workers. Results indicate that there are substantial differences in the degree to which machine operators, clerical personnel, and computer programmers experience alienating conditions and that there are additional differences in the degree of self-estrangement experienced. Level of self-estrangement was related to (a) lack of control over work processes (powerlessness), (b) performance of narrow work roles due to advanced task specialization (meaninglessness), and (c) the lack of opportunities for promotion. (27 ref.) (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved)
 
Article
Attempted to specify the nature of the linkage between status consistency and political orientation and to evaluate this relationship empirically in terms of G. E. Lenski's (1954) status crystallization thesis vs the relative status thesis. Methodological refinements included the use of age both as an interpretive variable and as a factor directly incorporated into the status consistency measures. Questionnaire responses from a sample of 733 male heads of households indicated that it is not status inconsistency per se, but the relationship of rewards and investments to equilibration opportunities that has a significant impact on political orientations. (19 ref) (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved)
 
Article
Conventional meanings of the qualities of selfishness and altruism tend to be confusing, contradictory, and often inappropriate in classifying and understanding human behavior and social character. Characterological patterns of receiving and giving are explored with a new typology based on the personality needs for nurturance and succorance. Presented as character types, they are: the altruistic self, the selfish self, the receptive-giving self, and the inner-sustaining self. The finding of an empirical study of these 4 character types as found among a sample of 572 college students are reported. The results of the study suggest that the needs for nurturance and succorance tend to be highly functional in the personality makeup of the individual and may successfully be conceptualized in terms of the indicated typology. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved)
 
Article
Several hypotheses regarding family determinants of ambition were tested on the basis of questionnaire data from 2175 nonethnic high school seniors in Los Angeles. High ambition and a relative emphasis on the educational rather than material component of ambition were found to be associated with high breadwinner's education relative to occupation, higher mother's than father's education, and a small family. Level but not emphasis in ambition may be related to family stability. Position and sex of siblings were unrelated to ambition when controls were introduced for family size. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved)
 
Article
Tested the attitudes of 222 turkish students toward the united states, using (a) the "two-way mirror" hypothesis that foreign student favorability toward a host country reflects the degree to which the student believes its people are favorable to his nation, and (b) the "u curve" of favorability toward the host country by length of sojourn. Unlike previous investigations, students were examined by questionnaire after they returned to their own country. The two-way mirror hypothesis received limited but positive support. The u-shaped curve hypothesis was supported by the finding that ss returning home during their 2nd and 3rd yr. Abroad had less favorable attitudes toward the united states. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved)
 
Article
College freshmen were surveyed on 27 variables, and the association of these variables with the romantic love complex are reported. The major findings were that (a) male, single, citizen, white, middle-class, college freshmen tend to be more inclined to accept the romantic love complex than do their female counterparts; and (b) romanticism is associated with weakness and psychological disturbance in men and with energy and stability in women. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved)
 
Article
Data collected from high school seniors and college freshmen in 1976 and 1986 on their personal goals indicate that the Ss surveyed more recently placed more importance on wealth; having a job with good earning potential, status, and opportunity for advancement; and having time for personal pursuits. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved)
 
Article
Identified basic dimensions of Greek American (GA) ethnicity and examined how they vary over 3 generations of GAs. Data were collected from the Akron, Ohio Greek community. Ss included 44 1st-, 56 2nd-, and 19 3rd-generation GAs. Results indicate 2 basic dimensions in GA ethnicity: externalities, which encompass the linkages with the old world, and internalities, which include ethnic attributes that bind the GAs together as a community within the dominant society. (39 ref) (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved)
 
Article
A comparison of the responses of 161 Anglos and 434 Mexican Americans to interview items designed to measure fatalism and familism showed a moderate ethnic difference in fatalism and a larger difference in familism. Controls for education largely removed the difference in fatalism, but at each educational level the Mexican Americans appeared, as a whole, to be distinctly more familistic than the Anglos. Although fatalism rather than familism is emphasized in most "cultural handicap" explanations for the low socioeconomic status of Mexican Americans, the present findings lend little support to those explanations. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved)
 
Article
Stereotypes of the Anglo and self-images were obtained from 280 native-born (US-born) and foreign-born (Mexican-born) Mexican-American students and community residents. Statistical comparisons indicate that significantly more foreign-born Ss hold favorable stereotypes and self-images than do native-born Ss. Findings were attributed to differences in the groups' definition of their present social situation as influenced by whether they employed their prior socioeconomic situation or the socioeconomic situation of the dominant society as a standard of evaluation. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved)
 
Article
Prior studies of student activists have suggested that their behavior in many instances has represented an extension of parental values and not rebellion. This has resulted in a "potential continuity" hypothesis, with data coming chiefly from elitist schools. The present study was based on questionnaire responses from 716 students in the free university program of a nonelite midwestern school. Activism was defined as protest behavior with 3 criteria utilized: (a) an antiwar protest in the state capital; (b) an antiwar protest in washington, D.c.; or (c) a sit-in at the office of the university president. Results do not support the continuity hypothesis but suggest movement away from parental values to more liberal views. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved)
 
Article
85 Ss, who were central participants in 2 anti-pornography crusades in 2 towns, were part of a research to test Gamson's proposition that optimum conditions exist for the mobilization of citizen political action when citizens report a high degree of political efficacy and a low degree of political trust. Results of interview data reveal that Gamson's proposition is supported in that the results demonstrate that it applies to citizen action which is change-resistant and to the right of political center. (34 ref.) (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved)
 
Article
DATA ON IRAQI COLLEGE GIRLS, OBTAINED THROUGH A QUESTIONNAIRE, REVEALED A POSITIVE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN THE EDUCATIONAL ASPIRATIONS OF THESE STUDENTS AND THE FATHER'S SOCIOECONOMIC STATUS, FATHER'S EDUCATIONAL ATTAINMENT, AND THE FAMILY PATTERN OF AUTHORITY. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved)
 
Article
2 possible attitudinal bases for social class differences in the occupational goals of male high school students are contrasted: (1) evaluation of the occupational structure and (2) perceived accessibility of desired occupations. Data are presented which provide firm evidence that perception of limited access to high prestige adult occupations accounts, at least in part, for the relatively modest occupational orientations of lower class students. The findings provide no grounds for either accepting or rejecting the differential evaluation hypothesis. Academic aptitude is considered as a factor mediating class differences in occupational achievement. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved)
 
Article
Tested R. A. Easterlin's (1961, 1967, 1968, 1978) theory of relative income and E. W. Morris and M. Winter's (see record 1976-01698-001) theory of family adaptation. The relationship between the housing aspirations and predicted fertility of 1,001 college students was analyzed using log-linear analysis and multiple regression. Ss' willingness to consider fertility limitation and childlessness solely to purchase a home was also analyzed. Most of the results corroborate the theories. (41 ref) (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved)
 
Article
Tested the validity of certain assumptions underlying use of preconstructed Likert-type attitude scales on populations other than the one on which the scale was constructed. Two samples from different, but similar, cultures (100 American undergraduates and 100 residents of a British new town) were utilized to construct a community attitude scale, and data were compared using item discrimination values, measures of total test reliability, and sample statistics. Possible effects of the use of prebuilt scales in cross-cultural research are also described. Results suggest that the practice of using Likert scales on groups other than the ones on which they are constructed is tenuous and should be avoided. Suggestions are also made concerning possible methods of comparing attitudes in different populations. (21/4 p ref) (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved)
 
Article
Previous studies suggest that the most significant determinants of a foreign student's attitude toward the host country include the national status of his home country, the degree of his contact with Americans, the frustration he encounters during his sojourn, the length of time he has been in the U.S., and his authoritarianism. Results of a study of 250 students indicate that Chinese student attitudes toward the U.S. are positively associated with contact with Americans, but negatively associated with authoritarianism. A -curve hypothesis concerning attitude changes through time was partially supported. No association was found between a Chinese student's attitude and the perceived national status of his home country, or his degree of frustration. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved)
 
Article
Past research has employed the California F Scale and other agree-disagree attitude scales to establish the existence of a relationship between authoritarianism and social class. Since acquiescence research indicates that response bias is concentrated in lower social strata, the development of a new technique for measuring mass social attitudes is warranted. The Protest Situational Attitude Scale (PSAS), a semantic differential instrument which is similar to several recent measures in the domains of prejudice and sexism is described. The PSAS was administered to 84 high school teachers and 500 labor union members (119 responses, 23.8%, were received from the latter group). Comparisons across the 2 occupational groups show that blue-collar respondents were not fundamentally intolerant of protest behavior. While the data do not provide unequivocal evidence about "working class authoritarianism," they do demonstrate that the situational scale approach warrants further consideration. (34 ref) (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved)
 
Article
Investigated the validity of the FEM Scale, a 20-item Likert-type measure of attitudes toward feminism. Since the FEM Scale items deal mainly with traditional sex-role norms and anti-feminine stereotypes, it may be more generally conceived as a measure of sexist or authoritarian attitudes toward women. 283 college students, selected from a heterogeneous sample, served as Ss. Ss were administered the FEM Scale and a questionnaire which measured anti-Black prejudice, attitudes toward feminism, identification with the Women's Movement and which included a 20-item form of the Rokeach Dogmatism Scale. Analysis indicated that the FEM Scale (a) is highly reliable, (b) contains a single factor accounting for 38% of the variance, and (c) correlated with measures of anti-Black prejudice, dogmatism, and identification with the Women's Movement. The reliability and validity of 5- and 10-item versions of the FEM Scale were also demonstrated with these data. Analysis of data from 147 members of 2 ideologically opposed women's organizations—the National Organization of Women and Fascination Womanhood—lent additional support to the scale's construct validity. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved)
 
Article
In order to test selected aspects of the delinquency subculture theories of Albert Cohen, and of Richard Cloward and Lloyd Ohlin, 2 Likert-type attitude scales were built. The 2 scales measured value orientation and awareness of limited opportunity, and were retested on lower and middle class 6th and 9th grade white public school children. In a final test of their usefulness, the scales were administered with other measures of socialization, delinquency proneness, and self-concept. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved)
 
Article
Notes that while both the labeling and conflict perspectives suggest that more severe criminal sanctions are imposed on lower-class and minority defendants, prior research has not consistently revealed such disparity. The present authors argue that discrimination is more likely to be found in the backstage regions of criminal-justice decision making. An analysis of data from institutional records for a cohort of 137 offenders (mean age 29.3 yrs) admitted to a state prison in an upper plains state suggests that although Native Americans have not been more severely treated at sentencing (a frontstage decision), they are less likely to be paroled (a backstage decision) than similar non-Indian offenders. (51 ref) (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved)
 
Article
Explored the relationships of status, work conditions, and intraoccupational achievement to dimensional and global measures of self-evaluation. 661 male workers in 7 occupations spanning the prestige hierarchy (garbage collector, parks worker, bartender, barber, mail carrier, high school teacher, and professor) answered questions on their self-esteem. Results show that occupational prestige accounted for slightly under 4% of the variance in global self-esteem. Bartenders were the only group to have self-esteem scores above the grand mean on every measure of the dependent variable. For the occupational dimension, garbage collectors were lowest, but bartenders were higher than professors. Bartenders may be typical of low status workers whose jobs are embedded in idiocultures that enhance self-esteem. On the family dimension, garbage collectors reported higher self-esteem than teachers or professors. Higher status occupations may make more demands on the worker leaving him or her with less time for family involvement. Also, higher status workers may have higher standards for family life. (42 ref) (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved)
 
Article
A comparison is presented between data on American preferences in feminine beauty and data from an identical previous study on British preferences. Variations in preference by age, sex, education, region, and occupational status are presented. Overall, and within and between categories on every variable, Americans show uniformity of preference. In both countries age was the most important differentiator of preference. Implications of this type of comparative data for delineating differences in social structure are discussed. (24 ref.) (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved)
 
Article
Presents a comparison of different tracking methods used to locate respondents whose last known addresses were 12 yrs old. Examination of the relationship of tracking success to personal characteristics of the sample members and attributes of their residence communities suggested that certain factors may either inhibit or aid in locating people. Specifically, the persons most likely to be found were those tracked in small towns and low density agricultural areas, located some distance from urban and metropolitan centers. Possible implications of these findings, in terms of the continuing importance of rural-urban distinctions, are suggested. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved)
 
Article
"Minimum" and "maximum" models of social control theory derived from the work of T. Hirschi (1969, 1973) are formally stated in the language of L. A. Goodman's (1972) log linear system. Models derived from control theory provided potent and parsimonious explanations of (a) student voting behavior in strike referendum at the University of Toronto, and (b) student attitudes toward the Canadian government's use of the War Measures Act to impose political conformity during a perceived national crisis. The ideological implications of these findings for interventionist policies are discussed. (2½ p ref) (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved)
 
Top-cited authors
Douglas Massey
  • Princeton University
David Karp
  • Boston College, USA
Thomas Laveist
  • George Washington University
Mitchell Pravatiner
  • University of Chicago
James E. Gruber
  • University of Michigan-Dearborn