Project Management Journal

Published by Wiley
Online ISSN: 1938-9507
Publications
Required uplift for rail as function of the maximum acceptable level of risk for cost overrun, constant prices (N=46). Source: Flyvbjerg database on large-scale infrastructure projects. 
Required uplift for fixed links as function of the maximum acceptable level of risk for cost overrun, constant prices (N=34).
Article
A major source of risk in project management is inaccurate forecasts of project costs, demand, and other impacts. The paper presents a promising new approach to mitigating such risk, based on theories of decision making under uncertainty which won the 2002 Nobel prize in economics. First, the paper documents inaccuracy and risk in project management. Second, it explains inaccuracy in terms of optimism bias and strategic misrepresentation. Third, the theoretical basis is presented for a promising new method called "reference class forecasting," which achieves accuracy by basing forecasts on actual performance in a reference class of comparable projects and thereby bypassing both optimism bias and strategic misrepresentation. Fourth, the paper presents the first instance of practical reference class forecasting, which concerns cost forecasts for large transportation infrastructure projects. Finally, potentials for and barriers to reference class forecasting are assessed.
 
Article
After 25 years from its inception by Freeman in 1984, the stakeholder approach enjoys support from a growing community of researchers and practitioners. In this article, we try to outline this development by carrying out a meta-analysis within the leading project management journals. We found that stakeholder theory is predominantly fed by articles from Anglo-American countries and applied in the construction and IT sectors. The understanding of the stakeholder notion is moved towards a more complex view. Articles from different project management areas indicate the key role of stakeholders in projects.
 
Article
This paper presents a study on the progress of project management. Descriptions of projects from 2000 and 2008 are studied. The study concludes that the field of project management is moving ahead. Project team members are more knowledgeable about project work, project objectives are more clearly expressed, project organization is more appropriate, most work processes are improved, and team members experience project work as rewarding and are more motivated for future projects. However, the project results are not fully satisfactory. It is shown that stakeholders' satisfaction could be improved by better decision processes, better management and leadership, and closer cooperation with the stakeholders.
 
Article
This study surveyed 497 participants to determine the factors that affect project professionals' acceptance of project management software and the perceived impact of software usage on their performance. The study finds that greater information quality and higher project complexity are the dominant factors explaining higher levels of system utilization, that greater system functionality and ease of use have a significant positive relationship with increased software usage, and that a strong positive relationship exists between higher usage of project management software and perceived project managers' improved performance. Inconsistent with prior research, more training was not found to be associated with project management software usage. The study explains more than 40% of the variation in project management software acceptance and adds project management software usage to project success factors by empirically confirming for the first time that project management software enhances project professionals' perceived performance and provides a positive impact on the results of their projects. The study provides practical implications for project professionals, their organizations, senior management, decision makers, software developers, and vendors. These findings support the call for further research that investigates the diffusion of information technologies in the project management field and their impact on project success and competitive position.
 
Article
Many individuals are called upon to undertake project management responsibilities with little or no preparation. Such project managers have been referred to as accidental project managers. This article examines the experiences of 46 accidental project managers within the Western Australian public sector through a questionnaire survey. Findings reveal that most project managers were selected based on their technical or managerial expertise and thus lacked the required competencies to deliver a project. There was a greater propensity for accidental project managers to act in a part-time mode, undertake nontechnical projects, and be provided with limited training and education.
 
Article
The objective of the present research is to examine the effectiveness of “teaming with the client,” using blended service provider–client teams as an organizational strategy for achieving effective co-production engagements. The results show that having a blended team creates a more trusting relationship between the project manager and client. The client's trust results in greater team trust, team cohesion, and team performance. However, the research also demonstrates an important limitation to the use of blended teams. In blended teams, when the client does not trust the project manager, significant problems arise for the team itself as compared to non-blended teams.
 
Article
A study was undertaken to understand why cost overruns and schedule delays have occurred and continue to occur on large-scale U.S. Department of Defense and intelligence community programs. Analysis of data from this study infers the causes of cost overruns and schedule slips on large-scale U.S. federal defense and intelligence acquisition programs to ineffective human resources policies and practices, consolidation of the aerospace industry, and too many stakeholders. In this article, each inferred cause and the resulting systematic effects are discussed in detail. Moreover, block diagrams have been developed for each cause and illustrate the sequential flow from inferred cause to systematic effects and reveal key interrelationships among each cause.
 
Article
This article examines project management through the lens of practice. Drawing on the literature, we develop a typological model that brings together four distinct theoretical types of project management practice. Adopting a deliberately critical perspective, we show that the first three types propose a weak conception of the logical relationship between the theory and practice of project management. In contrast, the fourth type, anchored in a pragmatist conception of the theory-practice link, provides the potential to build strong theories of project management practice. A specific objective is to elucidate the distinct features of the fourth type of theory.
 
Article
Researchers stress the importance of understanding knowledge transformation in projects. To explore how knowledge is transformed across organizational and specialization boundaries in project networks, we observed 22 knowledge transformation cases in two project networks. We found that new knowledge was created across specialization boundaries and that knowledge was altered across organizational boundaries. When both organizational and specialization boundaries were crossed, new knowledge was created. From these findings, we developed a set of propositions and formulated these into a model of knowledge transformation in project networks. This research contributes to a better understanding of knowledge transformation processes and outcomes in project networks.
 
Article
Project risk management is defined in the literature as being instrumental action based on rational problem solving. Research indicates limited positive effects of an exclusive focus of instrumental action on project success. This article proposes to extend this instrumental view through communicative action. This theoretical broadening was explored by interviewing project stakeholders about project success and risk management application. Analysis demonstrates stakeholders deliberately use risk management to convey messages to others, with the aim of influencing their behavior, synchronizing their perception, and making them aware of the context and their responsibilities. Stakeholders perceive these effects as contributing to project success.
 
Article
Literature in project management widely recognizes the critical role played by coordination in ensuring the success of project-based activities. However, partly due to some contingency theory limitations, understanding of how coordination occurs under extreme conditions remains interesting to investigate. This article questions the opportunities for learning lessons from the coordination within small military teams. More specifically, it explores coordination practices developed by fighter aircrews and ground forces when they achieve air-to-ground operations in Afghanistan. In these conditions, team members often challenge the usual coordination patterns and enact new practices and managerial solutions that can be consequential for a project team's learning process.
 
Article
The article contributes to our understanding of the drivers behind, and the nature of, project management implementation in the complex context of a transitional economy. Relevant insights are generated through an integrated and dynamic analysis of interviews and secondary data from a sample of local organizations, based on a conceptual model of strategic transformation. The analysis concludes with propositions about how both adoption of and resistance to project management implementation in the region could be understood from a strategic point of view, taking into account complex and dissonant circumstances of transition, history, cultural tradition, embedded social values, and identities of individual organizational members.
 
Article
Construction clients often use financial incentives to encourage stakeholder motivation and commitment to voluntary higher-order project goals. Despite the increased use of financial incentives, there is little literature addressing means of optimizing outcomes. Using a case-study methodology, the examination of a successful Australian construction project demonstrates the features of a positively geared procurement approach that promotes the effectiveness of financial incentives. The research results show that if the incentive system is perceived to be fair and is applied to reward exceptional performance, and not to manipulate, then contractors are more likely to be positively motivated.
 
Article
Implementing a performance measurement system (PMS) for research and development (R&D) is fundamental for supporting decision making and motivating researchers and engineers; however, this is a very challenging task, because effort levels are not measurable and success highly uncertain. Even if the subject has largely been debated in academic and practitioners literature so far, an acknowledged managerial approach is not available yet. This paper investigates the implementation and use of a PMS in new product development (NPD) projects, which represents a relatively unexplored issue in the R&D performance measurement debate. In particular, studying the case of a military aircraft development project, it provides a reference framework that integrates the major literature contributions' findings and suggests a practical approach for the design and implementation of an effective PMS for NPD.
 
Article
Streamlining new product development forces companies to make decisions on preliminary information. This article considers this challenge within the context of project management in the aerospace sector and, in particular, for the development of product-service systems. The concept of knowledge maturity is explored as a means to provide practical decision support, which increases decision makers' awareness of the knowledge base and supports cross-boundary discussions on the perceived maturity of available knowledge, thereby identifying and mitigating limitations. Requirements are elicited from previous research on knowledge maturity in the aerospace industry, and a knowledge maturity model is developed through five industry-based workshops.
 
Article
The analysis of several government defense and intelligence agency large-scale acquisition programs that experienced significant cost and schedule growth shows that several critical factors need to be addressed in the preacquisition phase of the acquisition cycle. These include overzealous advocacy, technology readiness levels, life-cycle cost, schedule details, requirements maturity, acquisition and contract strategy, program office personnel tenure and experience, risk management, systems engineering, and trade studies. The results of this study—which incorporated data from industry responses, government and industry executive interviews, numerous studies, and reports—indicate that early preacquisition activities executed in a rigorous fashion can significantly reduce the risk of cost and schedule growth. In this paper, the root causes of the cost and schedule growth are discussed as well as techniques and alternatives to improve program performance.
 
Article
This article presents an extensive investigation carried out in two technology-based companies of the São Carlos technological pole in Brazil. Based on this multiple case study and literature review, a method, entitled hereafter IVPM2, applying agile project management (APM) principles was developed. After the method implementation, a qualitative evaluation was carried out by a document analysis and questionnaire application. This article shows that the application of this method at the companies under investigation evidenced the benefits of using simple, iterative, visual, and agile techniques to plan and control innovative product projects combined with traditional project management best practices, such as standardization.
 
Article
Recent large capital oil sands construction projects have all experienced significant cost overruns. There are a number of reasons for these overruns, some of which are listed in this article. This article provides a review of recent experiences and challenges in delivering mega oil sands projects in Alberta. In addition, this article focuses on the front-end loading (planning) phases 1, 2, and 3 and describes the effort needed to deliver mega projects, provides schedule comparisons of key engineering milestones, and analyzes scope changes and contingencies.
 
Article
Innovation research has predominantly focused on hierarchically organized firms competing within single markets. Recently, however, researchers have debated over whether the increasing use of project networks within and across industries promotes or stifles innovation. This paper discusses a model based on crossnational diffusion data from three technological innovations in three-dimensional computer-aided design (3D CAD) and related implementation data from 82 firms. From the data we induce a set of constructs that form the basis of a two-stage model for understanding innovation in project networks. In the first stage of the model the alignment of an innovation to the existing allocation of work in a project network is ascertained. In the second stage, the implementation success and diffusion outcomes for innovations misaligned with the allocation of work are governed by the relational stability, accrual of interests, boundary permeability, and existence of an agent for project network change. In developing this integrative, two-stage model we resolve the contradiction in the academic literature regarding the degree to which project network dynamics can promote or stifle innovation.
 
Article
The goal of this research was to analyze current and future trends of the allied management disciplines that influence project management. We asked academicians and practitioners about the availability of knowledge and the potential impact of allied disciplines on project management. We were able to assess where the allied disciplines currently stand in terms of availability and impact as well as make predictions about the future. The thoughts and visions collected from this research provide valuable insights for identifying trends in the allied disciplines and their impact on the future of project management, as well as opportunities, challenges, and obstacles.
 
Article
This article explores the tensions between different modes of action that a project leader uses throughout the course of a project. The study examines whether these different modes can be identified and, if so, whether there is a possibility for the project leader to change modes. This is referred to as ambidexterity. Ambidexterity is explored within two polar expeditions. Results are surprising. No conclusion can be reached about the advantage of one mode over the other. But what does stand out as a discriminating factor is the possibility of using all modes throughout the project.
 
Article
The management of risk is considered a key discipline by the Project Management Institute and the Association for Project Management. However, knowledge of what needs to be done frequently fails to result in action consistent with that knowledge. The reasons for this seem to have received little attention. This study researched the degree of use of project risk management and barriers that prevent IT project managers from using risk management. Interviews and a survey were carried out. The results show that, in one-third of cases, because of the problem of cost justification, no formal project risk management process was applied.
 
Article
This study uses a survey of U.S. state government information technology (IT) project management practitioners to investigate the utilization of IT project selection and evaluation methodologies—financial and qualitative—and to assess the empirical relationship between the chosen methods and several measures of perceived project success. The analysis presents evidence that financial project selection and evaluation methodologies appear to be important in obtaining better control over project costs.
 
Expanded conceptual model.
Article
International projects are very attractive to companies seeking to expand their business horizons, and collaborative networks of international partners have created new work environments that differ from the conventional business structures of the past. This study provides scholarly research into the risks that inherently affect an international project's success and provides insight into the effective measures that project managers may employ to assist in analyzing and mitigating these multinational risks during the bid and proposal process. A new method of radial risk mapping assists management in graphing their risk findings to aid in their proposal analysis. These graphical representations provide firms seeking international markets with a method for selecting those projects with the least risk, thereby increasing their chances of success and maximum profit.
 
Article
An innovative negotiation methodology for managing conflicts in construction projects is presented in this article where multiple decision makers are involved. The proposed negotiation methodology has a unique ability to consider the attitudes of the decision makers, which is an important psychological factor in the negotiations that take place in various stages of a construction project. The methodology is developed at the strategic level of decision making in which the graph model for conflict resolution (GMCR) is employed in assisting decision makers, such as project managers, to achieve the best strategic decision, given the competing interests and attitudes of the decision makers. A real-life case study is used to illustrate how the proposed methodology can be conveniently applied in practice and to demonstrate the importance and the benefits of incorporating the attitudes of multiple decision makers into the negotiation process in order to better identify the most feasible resolutions. The proposed negotiation methodology has been implemented in a negotiation decision support system that assists project managers in tackling real-world controversies, particularly in complex disputes that occur in construction projects.
 
Article
Competitive advantages and access to competencies are among the most frequent motivations for developing various forms of collaborative relationships. While some firms claim to collaborate at a strategic level, as in joint ventures, others pursue collaboration at a micro level, as in projects. Collaborations at the project level involve a network of dispersed team members actively involved in common activities. This creates new challenges for effective decision making in distributed project teams, as processes are often ill adapted for facilitating collaborative work. Many researchers have studied aspects of these organizational problems. However, questions regarding team autonomy and decision-making processes remain largely underinvestigated. After reviewing the literature on key concepts related to organizational decision making, we conducted an empirical study using a quantitative approach that involved an online survey sent to project management professionals. The analysis of the data clearly indicates that success in managing distributed project teams is linked to team autonomy in conducting project activities and to formal decision-making processes. These findings also highlight the fact that a formal decision-making process is even more important for distributed teams that are highly dispersed.
 
Article
The Western project management (PM) approach requires the use of not only PM technology but also PM values/beliefs. This research is concerned with the likely cultural barriers for Chinese enterprises to use the PM approach. The literature review reveals the four cultural barriers of the Doctrine of the Mean, Strong Hierarchy, Family Consciousness, and Boss Orientation. Then, through a questionnaire survey at Yunnan province, this research provides some empirical evidence about the actual status of the four cultural barriers. In general, the Chinese traditional values/beliefs of Strong Hierarchy, Family Consciousness, and Boss Orientation are empirically major cultural barriers, and the Doctrine of the Mean is not. In addition, this research empirically reveals the differences in the cultural barriers among different types of enterprises and that appropriate PM training is very important to overcome the cultural barriers. Limitations of this research are also discussed.
 
Article
Individual team members can be instrumental to the success or failure of a project. This article will explore social and behavioral influences of an individual on the project team and how those behaviors impact the team's social behaviors. Literature review is used to present a discussion of the development of self-identity and an explanation of how an individual's social and behavioral tendencies can influence the formation of social identity, group emotion, group mood, and emotional intelligence. Using literature review findings, a model is developed to demonstrate the progressive stages of social and behavioral development from the self to the team, as related to team process development. In conclusion, a list of recommendations for managing team members at each stage of team development is presented.
 
Article
This article speculates beyond current thinking in project management, asserting that traditional project management cannot fulfill the challenges and requirements for mastering increased complexity in society, economics, and technology. The new paradigmatic evolutionary-systemic and cybernetic-systemic research results (including self-organization or chaotic systems) in the more recent natural and social sciences were analyzed based on their relevance for a new perspective in project management. Selected results of the research program will be presented, including a short description of “Project Management Second Order (PM-2)” as a highlighted result and a new paradigm in project management.
 
Article
Project success rates have improved, and much of the credit can be given to the knowledge, practices, and standards that have contributed to the professionalization of the field. Unfortunately, too many failures still occur. Because many of them can be traced to management and decision-making practices, it might be useful at this stage to explore a set of systematic biases to determine if understanding them can help diagnose and perhaps even prevent failures from occurring. This article begins with a framework identifying the influences on project outcomes, defines the systematic biases that may derail projects, summarizes eight project failures, uses the framework to diagnose those failures, and concludes by suggesting how organizational and project culture may contribute to these very common and natural biases.
 
Article
The purpose of this article is to suggest a possible “meta” approach of the project management field—the unit of analysis—respectful of the various perspectives in existence, while providing an integrative ontological and epistemological framework. In order to do so, I first suggest what could be perceived as being the state of the field and its main constituting “school of thoughts.” Then I open the debate on what could be the ontological and epistemological perspectives enabling us to better take into account the diversity we face in considering the richness of the field. Based on these developments, I propose to address project management as a complex integrative knowledge field, which eventually will lead us to consider “modeling—developing specific convention—to do ingeniously” as acting and learning mode in the management of projects.
 
Article
The Project Management Institute (PMI) plays an important role in the training, career development, and recognition of information systems (IS) project managers. Indeed, not only do IS professionals account for a large proportion of the PMI constituency, but PMI is also influential in the training of IS project managers. This study explores further the contribution of PMI to IS project management by means of its main publication outlet, the Project Management Journal (PMJ). To do so, the contents of the 39 IS project management articles published in PMJ during 1988–2005 were analyzed. The article focuses on the following dimensions: the relative importance of IS project management articles published by PMJ; the profile of the authors of IS project management articles in PMJ; the main issues, in terms of IS project management, covered by PMJ; and the major gaps, in terms of IS project management, in the coverage of this domain by PMJ.
 
Article
In this article, the process of developing the project plan and the project planning and control (PP&C) is analyzed and compared to the process of developing the project team to identify opportunities for integrating these actions to produce more successful projects. Results of structured research across some 137 different organizations and representing a wide range of approaches to establishing projects are reported. The results of this cross-organizational research strongly support the proposed integration of project planning, PP&C development, and project team building. A recommended process for accomplishing this integration is proposed.
 
Unit of Analysis
summarises the details.
Article
In this article, we suggest that organizations should not focus on selecting between various project management approaches, tools, or behaviors. Instead, we claim that the real benefit from project management implementations comes from the mere creation of a common frame of reference. Based on four case studies, we identify elements that enhance such a common frame of reference: (1) a common project management model, (2) common project management training, (3) common project management examinations/certifications, and (4) activities for knowledge sharing. Values created, especially when the application of the elements was mandatory, were better communication, better customer satisfaction, and easier knowledge sharing.
 
Article
The study of projects and programs, and their management, is seen as becoming an increasingly vibrant and pluralistic academic field, having transcended its pragmatic and functionalist roots. Drawing upon Burrell and Morgan's (1979) four paradigms of sociological research, we briefly review research that is set within each paradigm. This plurality of perspectives has informed and sensitized our analysis and sensemaking of a major business transformation program within a European retail bank. This article presents key findings and insights from our inductive research. The research adds to our knowledge and understanding of program-based transformational change and depth, richness, and perspectives useful to practitioners.
 
Article
Systems thinking is recognized as a critical ability for engineers who take a leading role in complex projects. Identifying those engineers with better systems-thinking capabilities is critical in many projects and organizations and enables organizations and project managers to select and place the most suitable engineers for jobs requiring a Capacity for Engineering Systems Thinking (CEST). However, up until now, no tool aimed at assessing individuals' capacity for engineering systems thinking has ever been developed. This paper presents principles for developing an interest questionnaire aimed at selecting engineers for jobs requiring systems thinking as well as preliminary results regarding the tool's reliability and validity.
 
Article
From the viewpoint of project success, the importance of human capital in projects cannot be overemphasized. Despite this, previous studies have only explored some segments of human capital in projects (e.g., commitment or trust). The aim of this study is to gather studies on the concept of human capital in project management and create an aggregating concept of recent studies. We report and discuss the findings from a systematic review of the research literature. This article focuses particularly on shared human capital (common meanings on the interfaces of the individual and team), and we conclude that the constructive elements of shared human capital are values, tacit knowledge, and social support.
 
Article
In a hierarchy of project objectives, strategic objectives will often be principally different from the operational ones. Operational objectives concern the project outputs/results, and strategic objectives concern the project goal and purpose. In this study, risks are categorized as risks to operational, long-term, or short-term strategic objectives, and, by studying a dataset of some 1,450 risk elements that make up the risk registers of seven large projects, we examine how operational and strategic risks are distributed in the projects. The study strongly indicates that risks to a project's strategic objectives rarely occur in the project's risk registers, though project success and failure stories indicate their importance.
 
Article
Serious problem projects (SPPs) often occur, particularly in a system integration environment, and it is difficult to prevent them, since the relationships among phenomena that occur throughout the project life cycle are extremely complicated. Our goal is to make it easier to identify major risks by distinguishing phenomena that are sources of future SPPs from phenomena observed in actual field projects. By choosing several events whose causal relation is known to be cyclic, we constructed a causal model and clarified that it can contribute to the easier recognition of SPPs empirically, by analyzing actual SPP cases.
 
Article
One of the many challenges within the project management community is how to structure the project management organization (PMO) to optimize the value of virtual project managers. Some organizations choose to include project managers as part of discrete sales or solution teams, with a small corporate group overseeing the project management methodology, training, and other miscellaneous responsibilities. Other businesses and organizations choose to centralize the project managers within the organization. The purpose of this quantitative research is to determine the degree to which a centralized PMO contributes to the success of a virtual project team. This article presents a subset of the data accumulated during the study, including training, standardized processes, electronic communication and collaboration, and leader behaviors.
 
Article
The purpose of this research is to contribute to a better understanding of project management practice by investigating the use of project management tools and techniques and the levels of support provided by organizations for their use. The study examines both general levels of use and variations among project types and contexts. Many aspects of project management practice are common to most projects in most contexts, while others vary significantly among different types of projects and among projects in different contexts. The purpose of this paper is to present empirical results that show both the common elements and the significant variations. The paper is based on a survey of 750 project management practitioners. The use of tools and techniques is seen here as an indicator of the realities of practice. The study found some aspects of practice to be common across all types of projects and all contexts, but on this background of similar patterns of practice, several statistically significant differences have also been identified. The primary focus of this paper is on these variations in practice.
 
Article
This article investigates the differences across and the need to consider both the client and vendor perspective in evaluating international sourcing (offshoring) success and highlights the need for incorporating relational factors into the success assessment rather than focusing solely on financial or operational outcomes (e.g., projects delivered on time, within budgeted costs). We take an expanded view of project success (using relational/process dimensions) and provide insight into how client and vendor firms evaluate success differently across relational dimensions and how relational factors play a key role in achieving success. Based on the findings, propositions are presented to guide future offshoring success research.
 
Article
Based on a business-to-business (B-to-B) case within the automotive industry, this study proposes logics (constructivist and determinist, respectively) of protagonists and highlights the complexity of their dynamics during the successive project's phases. The concept of milieu will emphasize the complex business in which project marketing takes place; notably, it allows better identification of relevant relationships. Our article focuses on this concept of milieu with regard to the interactions between project marketing and project management actors during project phases. In particular, this article underlines the difference and the accommodation between the dynamics of interaction and the dynamics of congruence of marketing and management logics.
 
Article
Teamwork during integrated design projects is complex. We address this by investigating how trust, collaboration, and conflict evolve over time to affect performance. Our results stem from data gathered using validated self-report questionnaires with 38 participants in 5 multidisciplinary teams at three points in time during a 6-week integrated design competition. Results show that without collaboration, trust and conflict have no bearing on performance. In addition to an unambiguous practical outcome—fostering collaboration helps build trust and manage conflict—our study points to theoretical developments: as trust- and conflict-performance relations grow over time, so does collaboration's mediating effect.
 
Article
In many project-based industries, there has recently been an increased tendency for collaboration and cocreation of value with the customers. However, many existing studies report inherent challenges and complexities related to multipartner collaboration. This article presents a conceptual framework that explains the focal collaboration related elements and their interdependencies in multipartner projects. The elements in the framework and relations between them are derived from the existing empirical studies and theoretical literature on collaboration, knowledge integration, and project success. Based on the conceptual analysis of the extant literature, we identify eight collaboration antecedents and three collaboration outcome elements. The conceptual framework explains how two collaboration mediators, project-collaboration quality and knowledge-integration capability, relate collaboration antecedents with collaboration outcomes. In addition, based on the literature analysis, we identify 15 mechanisms that enhance the project-collaboration quality in multipartner projects. The article provides novel insights on the dynamics of collaboration in multipartner projects by offering the concepts of project-collaboration quality and knowledge-integration capability and explaining their role in collaborative projects.
 
Article
This article describes the development of an undergraduate course on project management that incorporates experiential learning and service learning as the primary course learning methodology to instill in students the Project Management Institute's nine Knowledge Areas. The discussed instructional method is a dynamic and participative pedagogy. The project management course content is traditionally structured around system needs and analysis identification, functional requirements analysis, project timelines, network analysis, and project progress metrics. Introduction of service-learning projects and experiential learning pedagogies provides a pragmatic approach for applying project management concepts. This article compares and contrasts the first three offerings of this course and provides lessons learned that may be helpful to others wishing to embrace project management realism in their course work. The purpose of this article is to encourage a hands-on method for learning the nine Knowledge Areas in the undergraduate classroom.
 
Article
The commitment of participants to a project especially under extreme conditions, such as a polar expedition, has a vital bearing on its end result. But how can one apprehend the very notion of commitment? First, we distinguish the actors' “declared” motivations from what actually mobilizes them in the situation. Second, we use notions of mobilization, norms, and sensibilities in order to understand this phenomenon. They throw a light on the participants' behavior throughout the polar expedition and the project's progress. Our conclusions lead to a reconsideration of how to recruit for project teams, highlighting as they do, on the one hand, the importance of commitment not just in terms on intensity but also of meaning, and on the other, the difficulty of using this criterion for recruiting insofar as this commitment may be separate from the motivation expressed.
 
Article
The impact of steering committees on project performance and their role in creating value from project management capabilities is not well understood. A case study analysis was chosen to analyze the configurations and specific functions of project steering committees. A measurement model for steering committee configurations was developed to enable further survey-based studies. One of the major insights resulting from the authors' interviews with project managers and senior managers was that they perceived the existence of a project steering committee only when the context was defined and clarified. Furthermore, a large variety of committee involvements was identified, concluding that steering committees per se are very rare. On the project level, the cases clearly demonstrate that committees with project steering functions play an important role in the selection, initiation, definition, and control of projects. On the organizational level, they are important to implement and maintain project management standards. Finally, the results clearly indicate that steering committees directly support project success and are instrumental for attaining value from an organization's investments in its project management system.
 
Top-cited authors
Ralf Müller
  • BI Norwegian Business School
Kam Jugdev
  • Athabasca University
David Baccarini
  • Curtin University
Jeffrey K. Pinto
  • Pennsylvania State University
Monique Aubry
  • Université du Québec à Montréal