Muscle & Nerve

Published by Wiley
Online ISSN: 1097-4598
Publications
Article
The optimal management of muscular dystrophy is multidisciplinary and aggressive in nature. Serial assessment aids in determining the functional stage of the disease and in indicating specific therapies. Physical therapy can augment strength through exercise and relieve contracture through passive stretching. Occupational therapy is employed to help the patient manage his activities of daily living within the restrictions imposed on him by his disease. Progressive disability can be delayed through a variety of physiatric and orthopedic techniques, including surgical release of lower-extremity contracture, repair of foot and ankle deformity, and correction of scoliosis. Appropriate orthoses are available, as are a variety of special devices to facilitate ongoing care for postambulatory patients. Physicians treating the muscular dystrophies should be aware of the complications of these diseases, particularly cardiomyopathy, pulmonary failure, and psychological and social problems.
 
Article
Myostatin inhibitors are being investigated as treatments for myopathies. We assessed single muscle fiber contractile properties before and after 6 months of study drug in 6 patients with facioscapulohumeral, Becker, and limb-girdle muscular dystrophy. Five of the patients received MYO-029, a myostatin inhibitor, and 1 received placebo. The chemically skinned single muscle fiber preparation was used to measure single fiber force, specific force, maximum unloaded shortening velocity, power, and specific power in type I and IIa fibers from each subject. In 4 of 5 patients who received MYO-029, improvement was seen in single muscle fiber contractile properties; thus, there may be a beneficial effect of myostatin inhibition on muscle physiology at the cellular level. No improvement was seen in the patient who received placebo. This finding may be clinically relevant in spite of the fact that quantitative muscle strength measurements in our patients did not improve. Further studies of myostatin inhibition as a treatment for muscular dystrophy are warranted, and single muscle fiber contractile studies are a useful assay for muscle function at the cellular level.
 
Article
Introduction: ACE-031 is a soluble form of activin receptor type IIB (ActRIIB). ACE-031 promotes muscle growth by binding to myostatin and other negative regulators of muscle mass. Methods: This double-blind, placebo-controlled study evaluated the safety, pharmacokinetics, and pharmacodynamics of ACE-031 in 48 healthy, postmenopausal women randomized to receive 1 dose of ACE-031 (0.02-3 mg/kg s.c.) or placebo (3:1). Results: ACE-031 was generally well-tolerated. Adverse events included injection site erythema. Mean ACE-031 AUC(0-∞) and C(max) increased linearly with dose; mean T(½) was 10-15 days. Statistically significant increases in mean total body lean mass (3.3%; P = 0.03, by DXA) and thigh muscle volume (5.1%; P = 0.03, by MRI) were observed at day 29 in the 3 mg/kg group. Statistically significant changes in serum biomarkers suggest ACE-031 also improved bone and fat metabolism. Conclusions: Single-dose ACE-031 treatment was generally well-tolerated and resulted in increases in muscle mass in healthy postmenopausal women.
 
Article
Human normal (RCMH) and Duchenne muscular dystrophy (RCDMD) cell lines, as well as newly developed normal and dystrophic murine cell lines, were used for the study of both changes in inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) mass and IP3 binding to receptors. Basal levels of IP3 were increased two- to threefold in dystrophic human and murine cell lines compared to normal cell lines. Potassium depolarization induced a time-dependent IP3 rise in normal human cells and cells of the myogenic mouse cell line (129CB3), which returned to their basal levels after 60 s. However, in the human dystrophic cell line (RCDMD), IP3 levels remained high up to 200 s after potassium depolarization. Expression of IP3 receptors was studied measuring specific binding of 3H-IP3 in the murine cell lines (normal 129CB3 and dystrophic mdx XLT 4-2). All the cell lines bind 3H-IP3 with relatively high affinity (Kd: between 40 and 100 nmol/L). IP3 receptors are concentrated in the nuclear fraction, and their density is significantly higher in dystrophic cells compared to normal. These findings together with high basal levels of IP3 mass suggest a possible role for this system in the deficiency of intracellular calcium regulation in Duchenne muscular dystrophy.
 
The CaV 1.1 Ca2+ channel is restricted to skeletal muscle, whereas the CaV 1.2 Ca2+ channel is expressed in brain, heart, liver, and skeletal muscle. (A) Isoform-specific antibodies to the CaV 1.1 Ca2+ channel or the CaV 1.2 Ca2+ channel were used in Western blot analyses of membranes prepared from brain (Br), heart (H), liver (L), or skeletal muscle (SkM). The CaV 1.1 antibody detects a Ca2+ channel only in skeletal muscle, whereas the CaV 1.2 antibody detects Ca2+ channels in brain, heart, liver, and skeletal muscle. The slightly different size of the CaV 1.2 Ca2+ channel detected in different tissues is consistent with the known expression of alternatively spliced forms of CaV 1.2.10, 17(B) Competition with the peptide used to generate the CaV 1.2 antibody displaced binding of the antibody to the CaV 1.2 Ca2+ channel in both brain and skeletal muscle. (C) RNAse protection, with a probe complementary to the CaV 1.2 Ca2+ channel, yielded an expected product of approximately 300 bp in all tissues, indicating that the CaV 1.2 channel was expressed in all tissues. As a loading control, protection of the 28S RNA was found to be the same in all lanes.
Article
Although Ca(2+)-dependent signaling pathways are important for skeletal muscle plasticity, the sources of Ca(2+) that activate these signaling pathways are not completely understood. Influx of Ca(2+) through surface membrane Ca(2+) channels may activate these pathways. We examined expression of two L-type Ca(2+) channels in adult skeletal muscle, the Ca(V) 1.1 and Ca(V) 1.2, with isoform-specific antibodies in Western blots and immunocytochemistry assays. Consistent with a large body of work, expression of the Ca(V) 1.1 was restricted to skeletal muscle where it was expressed in T-tubules. Ca(V) 1.2 was also expressed in skeletal muscle, in the sarcolemma of type I and IIa myofibers. Exercise-induced alterations in muscle fiber types cause a concomitant increase in the number of both Ca(V) 1.2 and type IIa-positive fibers. Taken together, these data suggest that the Ca(V) 1.2 Ca(2+) channel is expressed in adult skeletal muscle in a fiber type-specific manner, which may help to maintain oxidative muscle phenotype.
 
Article
Myotonia is a heritable disorder in which patients are unable to willfully relax their muscles. The physiological basis for myotonia lies in well-established deficiencies of skeletal muscle chloride and sodium conductances. What is unclear is how normal muscle function can temporarily return with repeated movement, the so-called "warm-up" phenomenon. Electrophysiological analyses of the skeletal muscle voltage-gated sodium channel Na(v) 1.4 (gene name SCN4A), a key player in myotonia, have revealed several parallels between the Na(v) 1.4 biophysical signature, specifically slow-inactivation, and myotonic warm-up, which suggest that Na(v) 1.4 is critical not only in producing the myotonic reaction, but also in mediating the warm-up. Muscle Nerve, 2013.
 
Article
Based upon neurophysiologic, neuroanatomic, and neuroimaging studies conducted over the past two decades, the cerebral cortex can now be viewed as functionally and structurally dynamic. More specifically, the functional topography of the motor cortex (commonly called the motor homunculus or motor map), can be modified by a variety of experimental manipulations, including peripheral or central injury, electrical stimulation, pharmacologic treatment, and behavioral experience. The specific types of behavioral experiences that induce long-term plasticity in motor maps appear to be limited to those that entail the development of new motor skills. Moreover, recent evidence demonstrates that functional alterations in motor cortex organization are accompanied by changes in dendritic and synaptic structure, as well as alterations in the regulation of cortical neurotransmitter systems. These findings have strong clinical relevance as it has recently been shown that after injury to the motor cortex, as might occur in stroke, post-injury behavioral experience may play an adaptive role in modifying the functional organization of the remaining, intact cortical tissue.
 
Article
Two recent randomized, controlled trials failed to demonstrate a benefit of mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) over prednisone in the treatment of myasthenia gravis (MG). We reviewed our experience with MMF in MG to determine whether these trials may have been unsuccessful because of their short duration and the unpredicted benefit of prednisone. We reviewed outcomes and prednisone dosage for all our acetylcholine-receptor (AChR)-antibody positive MG patients treated with MMF alone or with prednisone for at least 3 months. The percentage of patients with a desirable outcome (MG-specific Manual Muscle Test score <4 or Myasthenia Gravis Foundation of America post-invention status of minimal manifestations or better) began to increase after 6 months; 80% of those followed for >24 months had a desirable outcome. Prednisone dose decreased after 12 months; after 25 months, 54.5% of patients took no prednisone and 75% took <7.5 mg/day. This retrospective analysis provides class IV evidence that MMF begins to improve AChR-positive MG after 6 months, both with prednisone and as monotherapy.
 
Article
Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is an autosomal recessive disorder associated with homozygous deletion of the survival motor neuron 1 gene (SMN1). Its centromeric copy gene, SMN2, is the major modifying factor. However, the genotype-phenotype correlation is incomplete and is therefore not useful in clinical practice. We studied a cohort of 103 patients in order to refine this correlation. In addition to standard disease severity data, we collected three additional criteria: age at death; brainstem involvement; and loss of ambulation. Gene dosage analysis was conducted by multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA). SMN2 copynumber was highly correlated with survival duration in SMA type I and ambulation conservation or loss in type III. Among SMA severity groups, it was not significantly different in cases with brainstem involvement. Although the SMN2 copynumber could provide prognostic indications, clinical discrepancies still exist among patients, suggesting the existence of unidentified modifying factors.
 
Article
The size of compound motor evoked potentials (cMEPs) to transcranial magnetic stimulation of the motor cortex was measured in the relaxed first dorsal interosseous muscle of the nondominant hand (ndFDI) during different levels of voluntary contraction in the homonymous muscle of the dominant hand (dFDI). cMEP responses in the ndFDI became larger when the dFDI was contracted to forces ranging 10-70% of maximum voluntary contraction. Variability in the amplitude of the cMEP responses in ndFDI decreased when dFDI was contracted. Comparison with cMEPs to spinal cord stimulation suggested a large component of the facilitation was occurring at a cortical level. The amplitude of cMEP responses in ndFDI also increased when the tibialis anterior muscle of the leg on the contralateral side was contracted. The observed facilitation of motoneurons during contraction of contralateral muscles might involve a transcallosal pathway modulating the excitability of one cortex when the other is activated.
 
Article
A brief history of the evolution of radiculopathy as a clinical entity, and the use of electrodiagnostic studies to diagnose it, are provided. Root anatomy and the concept of myotomes and dermatomes are reviewed, as is the pathophysiology of radiculopathy. The value and limitations of the various electrophysiologic procedures used in the diagnosis of radiculopathies are discussed, including motor and sensory nerve conduction studies, late responses, somatosensory evoked potentials, nerve root stimulation, and the needle electrode examination. The specific muscles are enumerated which most often appear abnormal on needle electromyography with lesions of the various roots. The electrodiagnostic differentiation of root lesions from plexus lesions is described, and the various electrodiagnostic findings with lumbar canal stenosis are discussed. Finally, the value and limitations of the electrodiagnostic assessment in the evaluation of patients with suspected radiculopathies are reviewed.
 
Article
Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) has recently been shown to be associated with deletions that are detectable using probe p13E-11 (D4F104S1). Although these deletions reside within large, highly polymorphic restriction fragments (20-300 kb), the "mutant" fragment is usually shorter than 28 kb and can routinely be detected using conventional agarose gel electrophoresis. Yet, the complete visualization of the alleles requires pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). Family studies showed that p13E-11 detects two nonallelic loci in this size range, only one of which originates from chromosome 4q35. We have assigned the other p13E-11 locus to chromosome 10qter by linkage analysis in CEPH pedigrees. Knowing the location of both loci improves the diagnostic reliability, as the exact origin of "small" EcoRI fragments can be determined by haplotyping. Since FSHD shows genetic heterogeneity, this 10qter locus became an interesting candidate to be the second FSHD locus. However, analysis of a large chromosome 4-unlinked FSHD family did not provide evidence for linkage on chromosome 10qter.
 
Article
Extracts of extensor digitorum longus muscle, atria, brain, and sciatic nerve from phenotypically normal and dystrophic ReJ/129 mice were subjected to sucrose density gradient ultracentrifugation, and the amounts of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity associated with each major enzyme form were determined. Normal muscle showed approximately equivalent amounts of the 4S, 10S, and 16S forms of AChE, while dystrophic muscle was relatively deficient in 10S AChE and relatively oversupplied with 4S AChE. This abnormality was not present in the other tissues examined. However, as measured by the 24-hour accumulation of enzyme activity proximal to a ligature on the sciatic nerve, the axonal transport of 10S AChE was only about one third as great in dystrophic as in normal nerve. This result is consistent with the view that the reduction in the amount of this enzyme form in dystrophic muscle could be related to disturbances in a transport-dependent trophic interaction between nerve and muscle.
 
Article
We evaluated the natural history of median nerve sensory conduction, hand/wrist symptoms, and carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) in an 11-year longitudinal study of 289 workers from four industries. Twenty hands which had carpal tunnel release surgery were excluded, leaving 558 hands for the primary study group. Overall, the trend was for mean sensory latencies and prevalence of slowing to increase, the prevalence of symptoms to decrease, and the prevalence of CTS to remain unchanged. Among individual hands, nerve conduction abnormalities tended to persist (82% 11-year persistence), while symptoms fluctuated widely (13% 11-year persistence). There was a strong, direct linear correlation between initial severity of slowing and subsequent development of CTS; however, most workers who developed de novo slowing did not develop symptoms or CTS. We conclude that changes in conduction status of the median nerve occur naturally with increasing age and do not necessarily lead to symptoms and CTS.
 
Article
The prevalence of internal nuclei in muscle fibers (centronucleation), which is a reliable cumulative index of all prior muscle fiber necrosis, was measured at different ages in different muscles of mdx mice and was correlated with muscle fiber diameter. The prevalence of centronucleated fibers (as percentage of total number of fibers) rose gradually after age 20 days until it reached a peak level of 80% at age 60 days. No significant centronucleation (or necrosis) was observed in the following circumstances: in 4 different limb muscles before age 15 days, in leg muscles that were denervated by peripheral nerve section or rendered immobile by high thoracic cordotomy at 15 days, or in rotator extraocular muscles throughout the animals' life span. In these situations, muscle fiber diameter remained below approximately 20 micron. The mechanism by which small-diameter fibers are resistant to necrosis in mdx dystrophy is unknown, but a similar situation exists in hamster and Duchenne muscular dystrophy.
 
Article
Mutations of the LMNA gene, encoding the nuclear envelope proteins lamins A and C, give rise to Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy and to limb-girdle muscular dystrophy 1B (EDMD and LGMD1B). With one exception, all the reported EDMD and LGMD1B mutations are confined to the first 10 exons of the gene. We report four separate cases, with mutations in the same codon of LMNA exon 11, characterized by remarkable variability of clinical findings, in addition to features not previously reported. One patient had congenital weakness and died in early childhood. In two other patients, severe cardiac problems arose early and, in one of these, cardiac signs preceded by many years the onset of skeletal muscle weakness. The fourth case had a mild and late-onset LGMD1B phenotype. Our cases further expand the clinical spectrum associated with mutations in the LMNA gene and provide new evidence of the role played by the C-terminal domain of lamin A.
 
Article
The physiologic and histologic principles underlying clinical electromyographic studies are briefly reviewed as an introduction to the normal and abnormal findings in human subjects. Technical aspects of recordings as well as the specific types of discharges and their significance are discussed.
 
Article
Contractile properties of diaphragm (DIA) from mdx and control mice were compared with those of hindlimb muscles [soleus (SOL) and extensor digitorum longus (EDL)] in vitro. Mice ranged in age from 2 weeks to 1.5 years. Muscles were directly stimulated and properties measured were: contraction time, half-relaxation time, active tension per unit area, fatigue index, and maximal velocity of shortening (Vmax). Active tension decreased significantly with age in mdx DIA but not in control DIA. SOL and EDL active tensions were less in mdx than control over the whole age range and did not decrease with age. Vmax was decreased in mdx DIA, but not in mdx SOL or EDL. These results demonstrate that DIA is more affected by muscular dystrophy than hindlimb muscles. Since many Duchenne patients exhibit respiratory distress, this differential expression of dystrophy in diaphragm, as compared to limb muscles, may have important clinical implications.
 
Article
Introduction: Distal acquired demyelinating symmetric polyneuropathy (DADS) is proposed as a distinct entity from classic chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP). Methods: We report a 58-year-old woman with DADS that progressed to a severe case of classic CIDP. Results: She had distal numbness and paresthesias, minimal distal weakness and impaired vibratory sensation. She had anti-MAG antibodies, negative Western blot, and lacked a monoclonal gammopathy. There were prolonged distal motor latencies. She remained stable for 6 years until developing proximal and distal weakness. Nerve conduction studies showed multiple conduction blocks. She developed quadriparesis despite first-line treatment for CIDP. She was started on cyclophosphamide and fludarabine. Twenty-five months after receiving chemotherapy, she had only mild signs of neuropathy off all immunotherapy. Conclusions: DADS may progress to classic CIDP and is unlikely to be a separate disorder. Fludarabine and cyclophosphamide may be effective for refractory CIDP.
 
Article
We report the results of clinical and electrophysiological examinations in 131 cases of meralgia paresthetica (MP) among 120 unselected patients, 69 men and 51 women, aged 15-81 years. All patients experienced permanent or intermittent pain, and all but one had permanent sensory impairment of the thigh. The lateral aspect of the thigh was solely involved in 88 cases and the anterior aspect was also or exclusively involved in 32 cases. The right thigh was involved 62 times and the left 58 times. Symptom duration varied from 2 weeks to 20 years. The initial diagnosis was meralgia paresthetica in 47 cases (39%), root disease in 35 cases, and osteoarthritis in 6 cases; no diagnosis was proposed in the 32 remaining cases. Two cases had undergone previous spine surgery for disk herniation, with no benefit. A precise cause could explain the lateral femoral cutaneous nerve (LFCN) lesion in 46 cases, the other 74 cases being considered idiopathic (25% of patients were obese). Only one case required surgery to relieve symptoms. LFCN conduction was studied orthodromically, distally from the anterior superior iliac spine. The side-to-side amplitude ratio (ssRatio) was greater than 2.3 in 118 of 120 patients (98.3%) and was a better index to confirm a lesion of the LFCN than SNAP amplitude, which was abnormal (less than 3 microV) in 88 cases (73.3%). Only two of the 11 bilateral cases had an ssRatio lower than 2.3 (they were both 2.0). An ssRatio of 2.3 or more and a SNAP amplitude lower than 3 microV provided a specificity of 98.75% or more. The mean axonal loss was 88%. These clinical and electrophysiological data highlight the central role the neurophysiologist should play in diagnosing MP by means of an LFCN conduction study.
 
Article
Factors determining response to intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) and plasmapheresis in myasthenia gravis (MG) have not been evaluated systematically. This study included patients treated with IVIg (n = 63) or plasmapheresis (n = 42) from two trials evaluating IVIg vs. placebo or plasmapheresis in MG. Response was defined as improvement in the quantitative myasthenia gravis score (QMGS) of ≥3.5 points at day 14. Baseline clinical, electrophysiological, and immunological factors were analyzed as predictors. Baseline QMGS, acetylcholine receptor antibody (AChRAb) positivity, single-fiber electromyography (SFEMG) jitter, and percent abnormal pairs and percent blocking pairs were higher in responders than in non-responders. Using multivariate logistic regression, the odds ratio for response was 13.0 (1.01-381.5) in QMGS 11-17 and 15.3 (1.34-414.3) in QMGS >17 compared with QMGS <11. Baseline QMGS, AChRAb positivity, and SFEMG parameters were more abnormal in patients who responded to treatment. Using multivariate regression, baseline QMGS remained as the only significant independent predictor of response.
 
Article
In murine muscular dystrophy, hindlimb muscle contains a functionally defective thiol protease inhibitor (TPI) which has been implicated in the onset and progression of the disease in mice. More recently, this protease inhibitor has been identified as parvalbumin, a calcium binding protein. In this study, a polyclonal antibody against mouse muscle parvalbumin was used to study the concentration and distribution of this protein in normal and dystrophic male mice at various ages. Immunodetection assays were used to screen extracts of hindlimb, forelimb, brain, heart, lung, liver, and kidney in 60-day-old normal and dystrophic male mice for parvalbumin content. Parvalbumin was detected in relatively high amounts in both hindlimb and forelimb muscle extracts, while much lower concentrations were detected in brains of normal and dystrophic animals. No parvalbumin was detected in the lung, liver, heart, or kidney extracts using the immunoassay. With aging, the parvalbumin concentration in hindlimb muscle of normal mice remained fairly constant for 90 days, whereupon the level increased at 120 days. In contrast, the parvalbumin concentration in hindlimb muscle of dystrophic mice decreased steadily with age to about 22%% of normal animals at 120 days. The parvalbumin content was also reduced in dystrophic brain.
 
Article
A case fulfilling the criteria for the diagnosis of diabetic amyotrophy is reported. Based on the clinical and electrodiagnostic features, it is concluded that diabetic amyotrophy is a recognizable clinical entity that can be differentiated from other diabetic neuropathies. The site of the lesion and the pathogenesis in diabetic amyotrophy remain controversial. The usual course of the illness is one of gradual improvement over weeks to months.
 
Article
Adult spinal cord transected (T12-13) cats were trained for 30 min/day, 5 days/week to either step on a treadmill (Stp-T) or stand (Std-T) for approximately 5 months. Training ameliorated soleus atrophy and enhanced maximum force capability compared to nontrained (N-T) spinal cats, with Stp-T being significantly different from N-T. Isometric twitch speed and maximum rate of shortening were unaffected by training; the soleus of all spinal groups was significantly faster than control. There was an elevation in myosin adenosine triphosphatase activity and a shift toward faster myosin heavy chain and fiber type compositions in N-T and Std-T, but not Stp-T cats. Thus, rhythmical activity involving muscle length and force changes (stepping) was more effective than a similar amount of a more static activity (standing). This specificity related to the type of training should be considered when developing rehabilitative strategies following spinal cord injury.
 
Article
The purpose of this study was to compare the capability of interference and rectified electromyography (EMG) to detect changes in the beta (13-30-HZ) and Piper (30-60-HZ) bands when voluntary force is increased. Twenty adults exerted a constant force abduction of the index finger at 15% and 50% of maximum. The common oscillations at various frequency bands (0-500 HZ) were estimated from the first dorsal interosseous muscle using cross wavelets of interference and rectified EMG. For the interference EMG signals, normalized power significantly (P < 0.01) increased with force in the beta (9.0 +/- 0.9 vs. 15.5 +/- 2.1%) and Piper (13.6 +/- 0.9 vs. 21 +/- 1.7%) bands. For rectified EMG signals, however, the beta and Piper bands remained unchanged (P > 0.4). Although rectified EMG is used in many clinical studies to identify changes in the oscillatory drive to the muscle, our findings suggest that only interference EMG can accurately capture the increase in oscillatory drive from 13 to 60 HZ with voluntary force.
 
Article
Bergström needle muscle biopsies have been used by exercise physiologists for over 35 years but have been less accepted by neuromuscular clinicians due to size concerns. We retrospectively reviewed over 13,500 muscle Bergström needle biopsies done over a 21-year period to determine sampling success, patient/subject experience, and complications. We compared sample yield between two different needles (Bergström vs. UCH), with and without suction modifications. Needle biopsies adequate for histology and enzymology were obtainable from the vastus lateralis, deltoid, biceps brachii, soleus, and medial gastrocnemius muscles, with a success rate of >99.9% and a minor complication rate of 0.15%. Approximately 450 muscle fibers were submitted for histologic assessment; suction modification and use of the Bergström vs. UCH needle were associated with larger sample size (P < 0.05). The suction-modified Bergström needle muscle biopsy technique is safe and provides an adequate sample size for histologic, ultrastructural, DNA, and enzyme analysis.
 
Article
Desmin, the intermediate filament protein of skeletal muscle fibers, cardiac myocytes, and certain smooth muscle cells, is a member of the cytoskeleton linking Z-bands with the plasmalemma and the nucleus. The pathology of desmin in human neuromuscular disorders is always marked by increased amounts, diffusely or focally. Desmin is highly expressed in immature muscle fibers, both during fetal life and regeneration as well as in certain congenital myopathies, together with vimentin. Desmin is also enriched in neonatal myotonic dystrophy and small fibers in infantile spinal muscular atrophy. Focal accretion of desmin may be twofold, in conjunction with certain inclusion bodies, cytoplasmic and spheroid bodies, and in a more patchy fashion, granulofilamentous material. Both lesions have been found in certain families, affected by a myopathy and/or cardiomyopathy. Other proteins, e.g., dystrophin, vimentin, actin, ubiquitin, and alpha-B crystallin, may also be overexpressed. Desmin pathology may be genetically regulated or may merely reflect profoundly impaired metabolism of several proteins within myofibers.
 
Article
We describe a 10-year-old girl with limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 2C (LGMD2C, gamma-sarcoglycan deficiency) with additional features that include progressive lower limb spasticity, peripheral neuropathy, and ataxia. The gene for LGMD2C lies in close approximation to the gene for autosomal recessive spastic ataxia of Charlevoix-Saguenay (ARSACS) on chromosome 13q12. The clinical presentation was suspicious for a genomic rearrangement affecting the expression of both genes. Using chromosomal microarray analysis, a homozygous deletion that encompassed the genes for both disorders was identified. This is the first report of a patient with both neurological diseases, and this case illustrates the clinical utility of microarray technology in the investigation of patients with unusual presentations.
 
Article
Neuralgic amyotrophy is characterized by acute onset of arm pain, followed after a variable interval by flaccid paralysis in the distribution of the brachial plexus on one or sometimes both sides. Electromyography reveals findings suggestive of an axonal degeneration process affecting various portions of the brachial plexus or individual nerves emanating from it, sometimes difficult to localize to discrete cords, trunks, or nerves. Diagnosis is established by excluding other causes, including compression and vasculitides. Prognosis for recovery is excellent.
 
Article
Like nearly all biologic structures, the peripheral nervous system is remarkably temperature sensitive. Clinical neurophysiologists are most aware of the untoward effects of cooling on nerve conduction studies, including reduced conduction velocity, prolonged distal latency, and increased response amplitude and duration. However, familiarity with the effects of temperature variation on the peripheral nervous system can also provide a deeper understanding of the physiological mechanisms underlying the function of nerve, muscle, and neuromuscular junction in health and disease. Intentional temperature alteration can also improve the diagnostic accuracy of certain electrophysiologic tests, such as the use of heat when performing repetitive nerve stimulation in myasthenia gravis or the use of cold during needle electromyography in some of the myotonic disorders. Finally, extremes of temperature have long been known to produce permanent neuronal dysfunction; recent investigations are beginning to elucidate the mechanisms of such injury.
 
Article
AAEM MINIMONOGRAPH # 14 Temperature affects biologic and neurophysiologic processes and is, therefore, always well controlled in in vitro experiments. Its role is equally important in the clinical laboratory but has often been neglected. Lower temperature cause slower nerve conduction velocities (NCVs), and increased amplitudes of muscle and nerve potentials. Fibrillations may disappear, and muscle contraction will be slower and weaker. Neuromuscular transmission improves. Somatosensory evoked potentials (SEPs) are similarly vulnerable in the peripheral segments, or with changes in central temperature. As a result, abnormalities are artificially created or existing defects are not detected, resulting in false or missed diagnoses. Control of temperature, albeit somewhat time consuming, will result in greater diagnostic accuracy.
 
Article
Corticosteroid treatment is the standard of care in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), but the optimal age to initiate treatment and dosage pattern remain a matter of discussion. We performed a long-term study of alternate-day corticosteroids in five 2- to 4-year-old DMD patients. The primary outcome measure was prolongation of the ability to walk. One patient lost ambulation at age 10. Four patients, aged 16 to 18 were fully ambulant, and 3 of them could still climb stairs. Respiratory function was moderately reduced in 2. Left ventricular ejection fraction was > 45%. Short stature and delayed puberty were the most relevant side effects. Although the negative impact of corticosteroid treatment on growth rate remained their major concern, parents and patients stated that they preferred corticosteroid therapy. Long-term corticosteroid treatment is effective in prolonging function but not in recovering lost function, and its early use seems appropriate.
 
Article
During a 6-year period, 14 of 898 patients examined at a pediatric electromyographic laboratory had a compressive mononeuropathy. These included five injuries to the peroneal nerve, four to the sciatic nerve, two to the distal radial nerve, and one each to the deep palmar branch of the ulnar nerve, the musculocutaneous nerve, and the long thoracic nerve. A potentially preventable mechanism was identified in 9 of the 14 patients, including prolonged posture in three of the four sciatic and two of the peroneal neuropathies. Four other mononeuropathies were secondary to pressure from an orthopedic appliance or procedure (one injury to the musculocutaneous nerve, one to the long thoracic nerve, two to the peroneal nerve).
 
Article
In this study we aim to establish a motor nerve conduction study (NCS) for the cauda equina and examine its usefulness in multifocal motor neuropathy (MMN) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). NCS of the tibial nerve proximal to the knee was performed with an optimized high-voltage electrical stimulation (HV-ES) method in 21 normal subjects, 5 with MMN, and 11 with ALS. HV-ES, but not magnetic stimulation, could supramaximally stimulate the cauda equina. Cauda equina motor conduction time determined by HV-ES, but not that with F-waves, correlated well with cauda equina length on magnetic resonance imaging. HV-ES revealed proximal lesions in 4 MMN patients but in none of the ALS patients. Importantly, 1 patient with "MMN without conduction block (CB)" had a CB in the cauda equina. Cauda equina motor conduction is better evaluated by HV-ES than with F-wave study or magnetic stimulation. HV-ES can help to distinguish MMN and "MMN without CB" from ALS.
 
Article
The purpose of this study was to evaluate the electrophysiological changes observed in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons in a simulated weightlessness rat model and to assess the mechanisms involved in these changes. The simulated weightlessness model was created by hindlimb unloading (HU). Whole-cell patch-clamp recordings, conduction velocity measurement, and ultrastructural observation were performed. In the HU rats, the action potentials had a longer duration and slower falling rate, but there was no significant effect on amplitude or rate of rise. HU also induced lowering of rheobase and of the threshold potential, making the cells more excitable. The conduction velocities in the proximal branches of ganglion cells were also decreased, and some degenerative changes in the myelin sheath were noted. This study provides evidence of plasticity of DRG neurons induced by HU. The changes observed might contribute to impaired motor performance in rats submitted to HU.
 
Article
Transgenic CD1 mice expressing beta-galactosidase were used as myoblast donors. The myoblasts were injected in normal or mdx muscles previously irradiated and injected with notexin. Twenty-eight days after myoblast transplantation, the percentage of muscle fibers beta-glactosidase-positive was low in mice not immunosuppressed but was high (80%) in those treated with FK506. In mdx mice, muscle fibers expressing beta-galactosidase were also dystrophin positive. Most of the mice not treated with FK506 produced antibodies against the donor myoblasts. These results indicate that FK506 is a very useful immunosuppressive drug for myoblast transplantation in mice. Irradiation and notexin injection used in our experiments are, however, not feasible in humans. Other manipulations capable of increasing the participation of donor myoblasts to regeneration will therefore have to be identified before new clinical trials are attempted.
 
Article
Electromyography (EMG) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are commonly used in the diagnosis of cervical and lumbosacral radiculopathy, but the agreement between the two studies is unknown. We retrospectively studied 47 patients with a clinical history compatible with either cervical or lumbosacral radiculopathy who were evaluated with both an EMG and a spine MRI within 2 months of each other. Among these patients, 55% had an EMG abnormality and 57% had an MRI abnormality that correlated with the clinically estimated level of radiculopathy. The two studies agreed in a majority (60%) of patients, with both normal in 11 and both abnormal in 17; however, only one study was abnormal in a significant minority (40%), suggesting that the two studies remain complementary diagnostic modalities. The agreement was higher in patients with abnormal findings on neurologic examination, underscoring the difficulty of confirming the diagnosis in mild radiculopathy.
 
Article
A 16-year-old boy had a 10-year history of stiffness in leg muscles. There was marked weakness of neck flexors, shoulder abductors, and ankle dorsiflexors, with hypertrophy of most muscle groups and both action and percussion myotonia. The parents were normal. Motor unit potential mean duration was reduced in the weakest muscle (tibialis anterior), and a biopsy of the same muscle showed only minimal abnormalities. Exercise and repetitive stimulation (30 Hz) of the tibialis anterior disclosed a decline in the compound muscle action potential that appeared to correlate with the muscular weakness.
 
Article
Botulinal toxin causes a marked reduction in the number of quanta released by autonomic and motor nerve terminals. As a result it causes blurred vision, inability to move the eyes, weakness of other cranial nerve-innervated muscles, dyspnea progressing to apnea, and generalized weakness. Electrodiagnostic findings in severe botulism can be relatively nonspecific, with low amplitude and short duration motor unit action potentials and small M wave amplitudes. A modest increment in M wave amplitude with rapid repetitive nerve stimulation may help to localize the disorder to the neuromuscular junction. Identification of the toxin in the patient's serum is diagnostic. The treatment of botulism is mainly supportive.
 
Article
Early diagnosis of botulism is essential for effective treatment. Electrophysiologic testing can be of major help to establish a prompt diagnosis, but the classic electrodiagnostic features of botulism are often elusive. Decrement or increment of compound muscle action potential (CMAP) amplitudes to slow or fast rates of nerve stimulation are often unimpressive or totally absent. Reduction of CMAP amplitudes, denervation activity, or myopathic-like motor unit potentials in affected muscles are found more frequently but they are less specific. In general, the electrophysiologic findings taken together suggest involvement of the motor nerve terminal, which should raise the possibility of botulism. The case reported here illustrates a common clinical presentation of botulism. This study emphasizes realistic expectations of the electrodiagnostic testing, the differential diagnosis, and the potential pitfalls often encountered in the interpretation of the electrophysiologic data.
 
Article
Technical and instrumentation factors play an important role in obtaining reliable information during electrodiagnostic studies. With contemporary electrodiagnostic equipment, neurophysiologic potentials are detected using a variety of electrodes and undergo differential amplification, filtering, conversion to digital form, and finally, analysis and display. Understanding the signal processing principles, limitations, and sources of errors that can occur during this multistep process can improve the technical quality of studies, minimize preventable errors, and improve clinical interpretation. Part I of this minimonograph reviews the basic principles of action potential generation and overviews electrodiagnostic instrumentation. The concept of waveform frequency content is related to the role of filters in suppressing noise while preserving waveform latency, amplitude, and morphology. The electrical characteristics of various surface and needle electrodes influence instrument design and the nature of the potentials recorded. This is especially important in understanding the differences in motor unit characteristics obtained from monopolar and concentric needle electrodes.
 
Article
Surgical treatment of lateral femoral cutaneous neuropathy (LFCN) is performed only after failure of conservative management. We reexamined 167 cases (7 bilateral) of LFCN of various etiologies (idiopathic, abdominal surgery, iliac crest bone grafting, trauma, and total hip arthroplasty) operated on between 1987 and 2003. Average follow-up was 98 months (20-212). The intervention was performed under local anesthesia in 139 cases (83%). Surgical release of the nerve was performed in 153 cases (92%) and transection in 14 cases (8%). Surgical treatment of LFCN led to improvement and patient satisfaction in 130 cases (78%). The results depended on several factors, especially the underlying etiology, duration of symptoms before intervention, and integrity of the nerve. Nerve release remains the first-line surgical technique, improving painful symptoms in many cases while preserving sensation of the thigh. It can be performed under local anesthesia by an experienced surgeon.
 
Article
Previously we reported that, after 17-day bed rest unloading of 8 humans, soleus slow fibers atrophied and exhibited increased velocity of shortening without fast myosin expression. The present ultrastructural study examined fibers from the same muscle biopsies to determine whether decreased myofilament packing density accounted for the observed speeding. Quantitation was by computer-assisted morphometry of electron micrographs. Filament densities were normalized for sarcomere length, because density depends directly on length. Thick filament density was unchanged by bed rest. Thin filaments/microm2 decreased 16-23%. Glycogen filled the I band sites vacated by filaments. The percentage decrease in thin filaments (Y) correlated significantly (P < 0.05) with the percentage increase in velocity (X), (Y = 0.1X + 20%, R2 = 0.62). An interpretation is that fewer filaments increases thick to thin filament spacing and causes earlier cross-bridge detachment and faster cycling. Increased velocity helps maintain power (force x velocity) as atrophy lowers force. Atrophic muscles may be prone to sarcomere reloading damage because force/microm2 was near normal, and force per thin filament increased an estimated 30%.
 
Article
Mutations in CLCN1, the gene encoding the ClC-1 chloride channel in skeletal muscle, lead to myotonia congenita. The effects on the intramembranous channel forming domains have been investigated more than that at the intracellular C-terminus. We have performed a mutation screen involving the whole CLCN1 gene of patients with myotonia congenita by polymerase chain reaction (PCR), single-strand conformation polymorphism studies, and sequencing. Two unrelated patients harbored the same homozygous G-to-T mutation on the donor splice site of intron 17. This led to the skipping of exon 17, as evidenced by the reverse transcriptase PCR. When the exon 17-deleted CLCN1 was expressed in Xenopus oocytes, no chloride current was measurable. This function could be restored by coexpression with the wild-type channel. Our data suggest an important role of this C-terminal region and that exon 17 skipping resulting from a homozygous point mutation in CLCN1 can lead to recessive myotonia congenita.
 
Article
Normal human myoblasts were cloned and transplanted in the tibialis anterior of immunodeficient nude and SCID mice and in mdx mice under different immunosuppressive treatments (cyclosporine A, CsA; antilymphocyte serum, ALS) or not immunosuppressed. This permitted us to show the interaction of the immune system in the myoblast transplantation. The graft success was assessed by verifying signs of humoral and cellular immune reactions and the presence of dystrophin produced by the fusion of the donor myoblasts. This study showed that clones of human myoblasts were able to fuse and produce dystrophin in injected muscles of immunodeficient mice and mdx mice receiving an effective immunosuppressive treatment (i.e., ALS+CsA). However, the same pool of human myoblasts injected in mdx mice inadequately immunosuppressed (i.e., CsA alone or ALS alone) triggered an immune reaction and was rejected. Cells expressing CD4 and CD8 antigens were observed in the injected muscles of mice treated with CsA alone. Therefore, evidence of humoral and cellular rejection was observed following human myoblasts transplantation.
 
Article
It has been suggested that interleukin-17 (IL-17) plays a crucial role in the development of several autoimmune diseases. However, there are no data about the relationship between myasthenia gravis and IL-17. The aim of this study was to measure the concentration of IL-17 and determine whether levels depend on the severity of MG. Serum IL-17 concentrations were measured in 25 patients. IL-17 concentrations were higher in generalized MG compared with controls and correlated with anti-acetylcholinesterase receptor antibody titers.
 
Article
Monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) is the most common paraproteinemia associated with polyneuropathy. Although the clinical and electrodiagnostic manifestations most resemble those of chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy, some patients manifest a pure sensory neuropathy or neuronopathy. The M protein is usually IgM, and its concentration in serum is low. Nerve pathology from patients with demyelinating disease shows a reduction of large myelinated fibers and segmental demyelination with remyelination. In some cases, the M protein possesses antibody activity against components of the myelin sheath or axon. These neuropathies may respond to treatment with steroids, immunosuppressant agents, and plasma exchange.
 
Article
In the early stages of Duchenne muscular dystrophy, chronic muscle degeneration is counterbalanced by regeneration whose progressive failure beyond the fifth year is attributed to an accelerated senescence associated with excessive myogenic cell division. This idea was tested by counting the numbers of myogenic cells accumulating over 90 h around individual living fibers isolated from muscles of dystrophic (mdx) and normal mice, 14-550 days of age. In cultures of normal muscle fibers, the number of myogenic cells per fiber decreased with increasing age of the animal. Cultures from young mdx mice exhibited an age-related increase in myogenic cell number, attaining at 50 days three times the number in control cultures. Thereafter, myogenic cell number progressively declined with animal age to control values. Thus, there is no evidence that extensive myoblast proliferation in young dystrophic mice-and, by association, in Duchenne muscular dystrophy patients-depletes their myogenic responsiveness in later life when they become weak and wasted.
 
Top-cited authors
Craig M McDonald
  • University of California, Davis
Richard Ted Abresch
  • University of California, Davis
Erik Henricson
  • University of California, Davis
Michael S Cartwright
  • Wake Forest School of Medicine
Mark Tarnopolsky
  • McMaster University