Medical Reference Services Quarterly

Published by Taylor & Francis (Routledge)
Online ISSN: 1540-9597
Print ISSN: 0276-3869
Publications
F1000Prime is an expert review service that aims to identify and rate new articles likely to greatly influence current biomedical and clinical knowledge and practice. In addition to the expert-selected and reviewed articles of F1000Prime, the publisher, Faculty of 1000, offers numerous personalized features, access to two open access journals, and an open repository of scientific posters and presentations. This article includes a sample search of F1000Prime and a discussion of its additional features.
 
Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) are a new type of online class that allow anyone, anywhere, to participate via video lectures, computer graded tests, and discussion forums. This article will give a basic overview of what MOOCs are, how they work, and some of their inherent advantages and disadvantages. It will also explore what MOOCs mean for medical education and libraries. A list of MOOC-related resources is also included.
 
This article is a retrospective look at the changes in hospital libraries from 1970 to 2014 based on the author's experience and a survey of the literature related to hospital libraries indexed in PubMed from 1970 to the present. New roles for librarians and methods for conveying the value of libraries to administrators are described.
 
Medical Reference Services Quarterly began publication in 1982, covering topics of current interest and practical value to public services librarians in medical and related specialties. Since then, it has expanded in scope to include more aspects of health sciences librarianship. This article is a systematic study of all 428 peer-reviewed articles published from 1982 through 2009, with a comprehensive description of content and a citation analysis. Content is extensively analyzed for article subject, and cited references are examined for subject, type of cited material, and average age. In addition, author, institutional, and regional productivity is determined and ranked.
 
The Cushing/Whitney Medical Library began providing end-user access to MEDLINE in 1986 and switched to the OVID system in 1993. MEDLINE is a core service of the library, and the choice of delivery systems has had a significant impact throughout the Yale-New Haven Medical Center. This paper describes the user response to MEDLINE, discusses the effects of MEDLINE on other library services, and suggests ways in which technology, policy, and funding have influenced use. Yale's experience suggests that removing barriers in all three areas can dramatically expand the points of access, the number of users, and the amount of use with manageable effects on other library services.
 
This is an update of an earlier article listing directories, journal articles, and general books that aid the librarian, resident, or medical student in finding information on residency and fellowship programs. The article also gives suggestions for building a file of program catalogs related to residencies, fellowships, and clerkships and related materials.
 
This is an update of an earlier article listing directories, journal articles, Web sites, and general books that aid the librarian, house officer, or medical student in finding information on residency and fellowship programs.
 
UW Medicine Resident Report Blog. 
This article discusses librarian support of medical education programs and patient care with blogs and wikis. Pedagogical background for using Web 2.0 tools in educational settings is explored and example applications given. A survey of health sciences libraries usage of blogs and wikis was conducted in 2009-2010. Using the results from the survey plus five years of experience using blogs and wikis at the University of Washington Health Sciences Library, best practices were compiled and are presented for guidance in establishing new blogs and wikis.
 
Grateful Med is a software interface developed by the National Library of Medicine (NLM) for searching several of NLM's databases: MEDLINE, its backfiles to 1966, and CATLINE. It is designed to facilitate access to medical information by health professionals and other end users with limited or no searching experience. This article describes the basic approach and specific searching features of Version 2.0 of the system.
 
Recent advancements in translational medicine have created an urgent need for solutions that support information dissemination and facilitate a fluid exchange of data from the research laboratory to the clinical environment and on to the broader community. Medical libraries can help meet this need by incorporating emerging Web-based technologies in support of educational, research, and patient care objectives. Web 2.0 resources facilitate creativity, collaboration, and sharing among users. Integration of Web 2.0 resources allows scientists, students, and medical professionals to efficiently organize and manage the information and resources that are critical in today's quickly changing biomedical research environment.
 
F.I.L.L.S. is a library-specific software package developed by librarians for library staff with little or no computer experience. MacNeal Hospital's Health Science Resource Center designed F.I.L.L.S. to allow libraries to save 60 percent of the time devoted to the interlibrary loan function while improving service to users. As a management tool, F.I.L.L.S. creates a dozen (12) preprogrammed reports that provide invaluable information such as Number of Requests for Periodicals, including copyright information; which libraries are borrowed from frequently; and which libraries provide the fastest or slowest service in filling loan requests. The article describes F.I.L.L.S., its capabilities and its limitations in greater detail.
 
Librarians at the Mayo Clinic developed customized Web 2.0 courses for library staff, health science faculty, and nurse educators. As demand for this type of training spread across the institution, a single, self-paced class was developed for all employees. The content covered the typical Web 2.0 and social media tools (e.g., blogs, really simple syndication [RSS], wikis, social networking tools) emphasizing the organization's social media guidelines. The team consulted with the public affairs department to develop the class and coordinate marketing and advertising. The eight-module, blog-based course was introduced to all employees in 2010. Employees completing each module and passing a brief assessment receive credit on their employee transcript. Libraries staff provided support to participants throughout the duration of the course through chat widgets, e-mail, and blog comments. The results show that even though a high number of learners accessed the course, the completion percentage was low since there was no requirement to complete the course. Deploying a single, self-paced course for a large institution is an enormous undertaking, requiring the support of high level administration, managers, and employees.
 
This article outlines five Web 2.0 resources and looks at the use of these tools among medical and nursing professionals and students at the Hospital, Medical School, and Nursing School of the University of Pennsylvania. Questionnaires showed that a majority of the individuals surveyed were unfamiliar with Web 2.0 resources. Additional respondents recognized the tools but did not use them in a medical or nursing context, with a minimal number using any tools to expand their medical or nursing knowledge. A lack of time to set up and use the resources, difficulty of set-up and use, skepticism about the quality of user-generated medical content, and a lack of perceived need for Web 2.0 resources contributed substantially to non-use. The University of Pennsylvania Biomedical Library is responding by increasing the availability of basic, quick, and easy-to-use instructional materials for selected Web 2.0 resources.
 
This article describes the experiences of librarians at the Research Medical Library embedded within clinical teams at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center and their efforts to enhance communication within their teams using Web 2.0 tools. Pros and cons of EndNote Web, Delicious, Connotea, PBWorks, and SharePoint are discussed.
 
New and innovative information technologies drive the ever-evolving library profession. From clay tablet to parchment scroll to manufactured paper to computer screen pixel, information storage, retrieval, and delivery methods continue to evolve, and each advance irrevocably affects the way libraries, and librarians, work. The Internet has forever altered information and library science, both in theory and practice, but even within this context the progression continues. Though ambiguously defined, Web 2.0 offers a new outlook and new software, presenting librarians with potentially invaluable new tools and methods. This paper discusses the creation, implementation, and maintenance of a Web 2.0 technology, the wiki, as a resource tool for an academic biomedical library.
 
The part-time librarian at Penn Presbyterian Medical Center (PPMC) serves physicians, staff, and students. Challenged by time constraints and the need for a physical presence in the library, the librarian sought methods requiring limited manpower and maintenance to reach out to users. The librarian utilized two Web 2.0 technologies, Delicious and Bloglines, to extend library services beyond the confines of the hospital intranet. This article details the process to implement these two technologies in the hospital setting. Informational resources about Web 2.0 technologies are included in the article.
 
The part-time solo librarian at St. James Healthcare in Butte, Montana, serves physicians, staff, patients, and other health care professionals in the area. The library is part of the Education Department within the hospital's organizational structure. Recent developments have expanded the requirements of the Education Department, creating new challenges. The librarian is a member of the team developing solutions to the many ways that continuing education needs have to be met for the staff and physicians. A free website that houses education information and material is one of the projects that has been created and is maintained by the librarian.
 
Web 2.0 refers to an emerging social environment that uses various tools to create, aggregate, and share dynamic content in ways that are more creative and interactive than transactions previously conducted on the Internet. The extension of this social environment to libraries, sometimes called Library 2.0, has profound implications for how librarians will work, collaborate, and deliver content. Medical librarians can connect with present and future generations of users by learning more about the social dynamics of Web 2.0's vast ecosystem, and incorporating some of its interactive tools and technologies (tagging, peer production, and syndication) into routine library practice. doi: 10.1300/J115v26n01_01.
 
Lucretia W. McClure is one of the most respected figures in the field of medical librarianship. During an interview, she reminisces about important events and changes in librarians' work, users, and services over the past thirty-five years. She also gives her perspective about the impact of computer technology on reference services. Finally, she urges reference librarians to take action to shape their future.
 
This is the biennial update listing directories, journal articles, Web sites, and general books that aid the librarian, house officer, or medical student in finding information on medical residency and fellowship programs. The World Wide Web has surpassed print resources as the most current and complete location of information about postgraduate training programs and specialties.
 
This is the biennial update listing directories, journal articles, Web sites, and general books that aid the librarian, house officer, or medical student in finding information on medical residency and fellowship programs. The World Wide Web continues to surpass print resources as the most current and complete source of information about postgraduate training programs and specialties. The Web has become a marketing tool for hospitals seeking to recruit the best and brightest for their residency and fellowship programs.
 
The University of Florida Health Science Center Libraries created a task force representing various departments to review data from its 2004 LibQUAL+ survey. This review compared results from the 2002 and 2004 LibQUAL+ surveys, and the data from the Association of Academic Health Science Libraries 2004 cohort. The task force analyzed the key components of the LibQUAL+ survey: Affect of Service, Information Control, Library as Place, and user comments. At the conclusion of this review, the task force made recommendations and suggestions along departmental lines to meet the patrons' needs and expectations. In addition to following the task force recommendations, the Libraries independently implemented several new services and hired additional personnel after the completion of the 2004 survey. Combined, these changes should improve overall library service and increase customer satisfaction. Looking towards the 2006 LibQUAL+ survey, the task force will be convened in advance and will guide the entire process.
 
This is the biennial update listing directories, journal articles, Web sites, and general books that aid the librarian, house officer, or medical student in finding information on medical residency and fellowship programs. The World Wide Web provides the most current and complete source of information about postgraduate training programs and specialties. This update goes beyond postgraduate training resources to include selected Web sites and books on resume writing, practice management, personal financial issues, the "Match," exam preparation, job hunting, and the DEA license application process. Print resources are included if they provide information not on the Internet or have features that are particularly useful. The Internet continues to be a major marketing tool for hospitals seeking to recruit the best and brightest for their residency and fellowship programs. Even the smallest community hospital usually has a presence on the 'Net.
 
This is the final biennial update listing directories, journal articles, Web sites, and general books that aid the librarian, house officer, or medical student in finding information on medical residency and fellowship programs. The World Wide Web provides the most complete and up-to-date source of information about postgraduate training programs and specialties. This update continues to go beyond postgraduate training resources to include selected Web sites and books on curriculum vitae writing, practice management, personal finances, the "Match," certification and licensure examination preparation, lifestyle issues, job hunting, and the DEA license application process. Print resources are included if they provide information not on the Internet, have features that are particularly useful, or cover too many relevant topics in depth to be covered in a journal article or on a Web site. The Internet is a major marketing tool for hospitals seeking to recruit the best and brightest physicians for their training programs. Even the smallest community hospital has a Web site.
 
Top-cited authors
Matthew B Hoy
  • Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research
Tara Brigham
  • Mayo Clinic
Donna Berryman
  • University of Rochester
Hannah F Norton
  • University of Florida
Michele Tennant
  • University of Florida