Management Research Review

Published by Emerald
Online ISSN: 2040-8269
Publications
Article
This paper examines whether International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS) can be used for monitoring environmental degradations. The paper critically examines the contemporary environmental accounting literature, and attempts to find a mandatory reporting mechanism in the contexts of accounting for a public good and REA (resource, event, action) accounting of McCarthy (1982). It selects the relevant financial reporting standards and examines their strengths and weaknesses. Using qualitative and case study research method, the financial statements of three global mining companies that are operating in an environmentally sensitive sector were studied. The study finds that the Global Reporting Initiative’s (GRI) guidelines and private sector self-regulation are insufficient to monitor environmental disclosure. The paper proposes a mandated separate statement of environmental assets and liabilities. The elements of the proposed statement are discussed.
 
Article
Issues in sponsored research are addressed: institutional commitment and targeted budget allocations, administrative and faculty commitment--structure and support services; sponsored research and institutional characteristics; and faculty development programs--research-oriented. (MLW)
 
Article
A variety of administrative issues can arise when multi-investigator, interdisciplinary research increases on campus. As research facilitators, university research administrators are in a position to help their institution with necessary management adjustments. Interdisciplinary research brings special opportunities and challenges to the campus and the profession. (Author/MSE)
 
A natural resource based view of a wine/apple tourism business 
The value adding web 
Article
Purpose – The paper aims to examine the competitive advantage of the environmental behaviour at a firm level and micro-cluster level, building the analysis on Harts model of natural resource-based view of the firm and by using Brown et al. 's framework for analysing contextual resources that would provide locational advantage based on environmental behaviour. The case study examines the drivers and the obstacles to environmental action and demonstrates how clustering has been important in progressing a sustainability agenda. Design/methodology/approach – A case study of a single wine tourism cluster in Australia is undertaken using mixed methods. Findings – The main drivers for environmental action are genuine concerns for the environment by the cluster participants, especially water conservation in the Australian context. Supporting this is the co-ordination of the Lovedale Chamber of Commerce which has promoted its “greening Lovedale” project as a source of regional identity and potential competitive advantage. The obstacles to action are those that are present when small firms dominate, a lack of resources and a lack of know how. Through clustering small businesses can share resources, access specialists and share knowledge. Research limitations/implications – A single cluster case study within the Australian and the wine tourism context confined to one point in time. Practical implications – The clustering of firms in agricultural regions offers the opportunity to achieve individual and collective benefits. Clustering participation can reduce costs, achieve scale economies and share knowledge. These advantages are relevant for environmental actions. In the context of weak or absent government actions and regulations over the environment, regional clusters can utilise the advantages of clustering to meet environmental goals. These in turn can contribute to regional identity and regional comparative advantage. These issues are addressed through the study of the Lovedale wine cluster in Australia. Originality/value – There are few studies of how clustered agricultural industries are addressing environmental challenges independently of central government directives or subsidies. Clustering enables small firms to participate in environmental programs despite being faced by resource and knowledge shortages.
 
New rules for IT management (Carr, 2003)  
Three principles of self-renewing organizations (Lewin and Volberda, 2003).  
Article
Purpose – This article revisits Nicolas Carr's popular Harvard Review article IT Doesn't Matter on its ten-year anniversary. The purpose is to analyze Carr's argument by analyzing the development of the argument itself as opposed to finding exceptions to the argument, which has been done in the past. Design/methodology/approach – The authors use co-evolutionary theory as a case against Carr's argument by showing that Carr has only looked at the growth of IT from a population ecology perspective and has failed to anticipate the adaptive nature of IT within the organization. Findings – The authors show that Carr's new rules for IT management may not be applicable if viewed through the lens of the three principles of self-renewing organizations espoused by co-evolutionary theory. Research limitations/implications – The authors provide a new basis for evaluating the strategic nature of IT and offer a background for future research and case studies into evaluating IT strategic competitive advantage within the organization. Practical implications – The research provides guidelines for organizations to better decide how to strategically implement IT to more fully utilize its capabilities. Originality/value – The paper provides a new method for refuting a popular article by attacking the argument as opposed to finding exceptions to the argument. This is valuable to those who wish to evangelize the strategic capacity of IT within the organization.
 
Article
The aim of this study is to empirically investigate the role of firm- industry-, institutional-, and macroeconomic-factors on a firm’s capital structure decision in the context of nine African countries. To this end, we consider a sample of 986 non-financial firms over a period of 10 years (1999-2008) and specify a range of models that link firm-, industry-, institutional-, and macroeconomic variables with varying measures of leverage. A battery of econometric procedures including Generalized Method of Moments and Seemingly Unrelated regression was used to estimate the relationship between the variables and provide robustness check. We document that: leverage is positively affected by firm size while it is inversely related with profitability; the effect of asset tangibility, non-debt-related tax shield and dividend payout on leverage is dependent on how the latter is defined; there is inter-industry variation in capital structure decision of African firms; income level of host countries moderates the influence of firm-specific factors on capital structure decisions; and legal and financial institutions and macroeconomic conditions do matter in the capital structure decisions of African firms.
 
Article
- Purpose: This paper aims to investigate the relationship among alliance motivation (AM), execution of cooperation (EC) and alliance performance of strategic alliance for commercializing technology and developing products. - Design/methodology/approach: The measurements were constructed and tested empirically through a survey of 320 strategic alliances in the food processing industry in Thailand. Confirmatory factor analysis and structural equation modelling were applied to refine scales for measuring AM, execution and cooperation performance. - Findings: This research found that firms adopted social interaction with alliance partners in order to establish mutual expectations about technology characteristics, access opportunity and organisational management styles, factors that are shown to have positive influences on both commercial and partnership performance. Findings also confirm a significant positive impact of technology characteristics, access opportunity, market potential and financial benefit on the adoption of a formal partnership agreement, but a significant impact only on commercial performance. - Research limitations/implications: Further research should use random samples in different industries in other emerging economies, and other data analysis methods to assess decision-making in strategic technology alliances that may include different types of partnerships. - Practical implications: The findings are also useful for managers who leverage operations with external resources obtained through strategic alliances parameters both in the process of managing relationships and achieving results. - Originality/value: This article contributes to extant literature by developing a practical measurement system of AM, actual EC and resulting performance in an emerging economy country. It also contributes to clarify the decision-making of firms that form strategic alliances for commercializing technology and developing products to facilitate more quality management research in other industries and countries.
 
Article
This study investigates the impact that ownership structure and board composition have on performance in a sample of Finnish SMEs. Our study is one of few that shed light on how corporate governance and ownership structures affect performance of small firms. Our results suggest that the ownership structure, in particular, affects both the growth and profitability of small firms. Firms with high managerial ownership levels exhibit higher profitability ratios, but have lower growth rates. We further find that firms with high Venture Capital Firm ownership ratios grow faster and are less profitable. These results can be interpreted to indicate that owner-managers are risk averse and that Venture Capital Firms seek investments with high growth potential. Our results on board structure suggest that board structure has little impact on the performance of small firms. The only significant result in this context is that firms with outside board members have lower growth rates and are less profitable.
 
Article
Purpose – This article aims to present a historical overview of the evolution of business ethics in China and highlights the ways in which its ethical structure lags behind its rapid economic expansion. Understanding Guanxi, the Chinese social network of reciprocal business relations common in Confucian cultures, has long been recognized as one of the major success factors when doing business in China (Hwang et al., 2009). Recognizing the significant impact of Guanxi and its influence on everyday dealings in China is, thus, crucial for Western firms. Whereas considerable research has dealt with the growth of Chinese industries in recent years, the key relationship between changes in its economy and shifts in Chinese business ethics has been neglected although it impacts the ways Westerners, in particular, both clinch deals and judge Chinese firms. The implications of this disparity for global business are discussed. Design/methodology/approach – The discussion draws on the academic literature and the researchers’ experience in how business and business ethics are conducted between Western and Chinese firms. This paper presents a content analysis of theoretical articles and compares them to conceptual and empirical approaches, with an emphasis on a pragmatic approach to fostering a better understanding of the evolution of Chinese business ethics and its implications on business practices. Findings – Maps the evolution of business ethics in China and need to adapt to an ever changing business environment. Originality/value – This study offers a new insight to the evolution of Chinese business ethics and highlights its importance in business interactions. It illustrates the co-evolution of business ethics in parallel with the advancement of the Chinese economy. This paper is the first paper that addresses the issue of the evolution and formation of Chinese business ethics and links it to economic progress and opening up to the West.
 
Article
Public confidence in the results of research conducted by universities and research and development laboratories is being threatened by the disclosure of instances of ineptitude, plagiarism, and outright fraud at some of our most prestigious institutions. Pressures for consistent success in research can promote an environment conducive to scientific misconduct. (Author/MLW)
 
Article
Purpose – The aim of this article is to expound a holistic intellectual capital index. Moreover, the paper presents its implementation within a real estate organization. Design/methodology/approach – The index is calculated on the basis of 14 structured interviews synthesized through the analytic hierarchy process, min–max normalizations and weighted sums. Findings – The authors estimate a holistic intellectual capital index and show that an analysis of its components may allow identifying discordances within the organization about the contributions of its value drivers. Research limitations/implications – The proposed index may be used in a medium-/long-term research to measure the evolution in the organizational intellectual capital and its relation with the top management’s initiatives and the competitive environment changes. Practical implications – The proposed methodology may integrate the reports prepared for shareholders and stakeholders and provide the top management, with an in-depth understanding of the different perceptions of the organizational human resources. Originality/value – The authors discuss a holistic index of intellectual capital that allows considering both the performances of the intellectual capital components and the interdependencies among them and also their strategic contribution to the value-creation process. In addition, they propose a novel descriptive statistical analysis of the assessment and management of IC-index components to draw indications for the top management.
 
Article
Purpose – The purpose of this study/paper is evidence to suggest that information communication technology (ICT) capital projects are different from non-ICT projects and that as a result the appraisal of such projects is more difficult. This may suggest that organisations would use dissimilar financial and risk assessment models or place different importance levels on such models between the two types of investment. The purpose of this paper is to investigate this issue and present the results of research into the practices of organisations in Czech Republic that have recently undertaken an appraisal of both ICT and non-ICT capital projects. Design/methodology/approach – A factual and attitudinal survey was developed and conducted during the end of 2011, addressed to organisations based in the Czech Republic. The object of the survey was the identification of current practices in respect of the appraisal of both ICT and non-ICT projects and the opinions of senior executives on a number of important issues regarding such practices. This paper focuses on the issues relating to ICT projects being “different” from non-ICT projects. Findings – The empirical findings support the literature in that ICT projects are, in many respects, different from non-ICT projects. However, the evidence indicates that, in practice, there is no significant difference in the financial and risk assessment models used in their appraisal. This indicates that any perceived difficulties, which may infer that the projects are “different”, are overcome (or ignored), to some extent, when it comes to the formal financial and risk assessment stage of project appraisal. There is also evidence to suggest that practitioners use assessment models that academics regard as unsophisticated. The findings also show that strategic issues are more important with respect of ICT projects than non-ICT projects. The research therefore supports the view that ICT projects are perceived to be different, but that the current conventional (financial and risk) appraisal models are adequate to appraise such capital projects, provided they are supported by a strategic assessment. Research limitations/implications – As the findings are based on a survey of companies in the Czech Republic only, we accept that the research results may have some limitations in terms of drawing general conclusions. The concern over drawing general conclusions is also brought about by the relatively low response rate, although the rate is in line with previous published research. Practical implications – ICT projects are different and as such these differences must be taken into account when appraising capital projects. The evidence supports the need for practitioners to review their appraisal of ICT capital projects, by adopting more sophisticated financial and risk models (as prescribed by academics) and linking their appraisal to corporate strategic goals. Future research should be aimed at identifying the formal and informal strategic approaches adopted by practitioners in the appraisal of ICT capital projects. Originality/value – This is the only survey to simultaneously address the appraisal issues concerning both ICT and non-ICT projects in the Czech Republic. As such, it gives a valuable insight into the practices of Czech Republic organisations in their appraisal of ICT and non-ICT capital projects. The identification of the four main problem areas with respect to the appraisal of ICT projects will help to focus academic research in the future.
 
Article
Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to analyze the probability of Islamic credit card usage intention among Islamic banks' customers. Financial cost, knowledge of Islamic credit card, attitude, financial recommendation and demographic items were examined in order to determine whether these factors are influencing the Islamic credit card usage intention or not. Design/methodology/approach – Drawing upon the theory of reasoned action (TRA), this study proposes a conceptual model to examine the factors determining the Islamic credit card usage intention. The research model is evaluated using survey data from 354 respondents with the help of a questionnaire. Findings – The results reveal that “financial recommendation”, “knowledge on Islamic credit card”, “age (young)”, “marital status”, “religion” and “education level” are significantly affecting the Islamic credit card usage intention. The research also concludes that “attitude on Islamic credit card” appears to have no effect on the Islamic credit card usage intention. Research limitations/implications – The research has two limitations. The limitations however provide support for future researches in the area of Islamic credit card. Despite the limitations, the study contributes to the body of academic knowledge by shedding more light onto the factors affecting Islamic credit card usage intention. Practical implications – Insights reported from this study are of particular importance to bank managers, providing them with an improved understanding pertaining to the Malaysian bank customers' usage intentions for Islamic credit cards. The research helps them to better plan for Islamic credit card facilities, in order to cater for the financial needs of Malaysia bank customers. Originality/value – The contribution of the research lies in achieving a more profound understanding of Malaysia bank customers' usage intentions for Islamic credit cards. The research manages to discover the factors which particularly determine the use of Islamic credit cards. It also expands the literature on Islamic credit cards.
 
Article
Purpose – The purpose of this article is to offer a multi-layered approach to gender topics in top management team research. Design/methodology/approach – Recent empirical work on the role of gender diversity in top management teams will be reviewed and contrasted with gender and diversity theory. Findings – The results show that gender diversity has often been operationalized and defined in a highly stereotypical fashion, strongly rooted in assumed biological traits (in particular male/female skills and aptitudes). This very simplistic assumption that men and women behave differently does not take into account gender and diversity theories, but simply reproduces gender stereotypes. As a result, a framework is presented that takes societal, organizational, group and individual variables into account to understand the impact of gender in top management positions. Research limitations/implications – The paper is a conceptual paper aiming at enriching scholarly work on gender and top management teams by considering several potentially gendered processes on different layers: society, organizations, groups and individuals. Originality/value – This concept is the first to offer a fresh perspective on the intensively researched topic of gender and performance in top management. By overcoming the stereotypical view that the contributions of female and male managers are inherently different, the paper aims to enrich the scholarly debate on relevant top management characteristics, and furthermore ensure that discriminatory ascriptions to female and male managers are not reproduced through academic work.
 
Article
A discussion of contemporary conflict of interest in university research administration offers a historical perspective of the political and economic factors in "academic capitalism" and looks at current pressures. Potential conflict situations that must be addressed in institutional policy formation are outlined. (MSE)
 
Comparison of theories 
Article
Purpose – This paper tries to explain why many socially-responsible firms appear to converge on a standard set of corporate social responsibility (CSR) practices instead of striving to differentiate themselves from rivals and achieve competitive advantage. Design/methodology/approach – Three explanations of this convergence are presented: herd behaviour, institutional isomorphism, and strategic cooperation. The different empirical predictions of these theories are laid down. The resulting framework is used to analyse a recent self-regulatory scheme launched by the steel industry, in which knowledge-sharing was used to stimulate poor performers to curb carbon dioxide emissions. Findings – Social practices of firms are very often driven by pressures to conform, instead of pressures to perform. Even firms that want to be innovative may be forced by stakeholder requests to adopt passive and imitative behaviour. Practical implications – The paper suggests that there are two types of CSR – convergent and divergent – and that firms need to establish which type of CSR best fits their needs before they address the issues raised by stakeholders. Originality/value – The literature on CSR focuses on the relationship between stakeholders and single firms. The paper tries to add to this literature by analysing the relationship between stakeholders and industries. The paper also contributes to the debate on the financial benefits of CSR by arguing that in industries where the convergent type of CSR is dominant researchers should not expect above-average returns for socially-responsible firms.
 
Article
Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to explore the “resource curse” problem as a counter-example of creative performance and innovation by examining reliance on capital and physical resources, showing the gap between expectations and ex-post actual performance that became clearer under conditions of economic turmoil. Design/methodology/approach – The analysis uses logistic regressions with dichotomous response and predictor variables on structured tables of count data, representing firm performance as an outcome of capital resources, physical resources and innovation where appropriate. Findings – Key findings relevant to economic and business practice follow. First, a typical characteristic of successful Vietnamese firms in the transition period is their reliance on either capital resources or physical asset endowments. Second, poor performers exhibit evidence of over-reliance on both capital and physical assets. Third, firms that relied on both types of resources tended to downplay creative performance. Some evidence suggests that firms face more acute problem caused by the law of diminishing returns in troubled times. Fourth, the “innovation factor” has not been tapped as a source of economic growth. Research limitations/implications – This study has some limitations. The size of the survey sample is approximately 150 firms, while the potential sample of > 300 should be possible in the future. When the size increases, the research could be expanded to include further variables that will help investigate more deeply into the related issues and business implications. With regard to the implications of the study, the absence of innovations has made the notion of “resource curse” identical to “destructive creation” implemented by ex-ante resource-rich firms, and worsened the problem of resource misallocation in transition turmoil. The Vietnamese corporate sector's addiction to resources may contribute to economic deterioration, through a downward spiral of lower efficiency leading to consumption of more resources. Practical implications – Insights obtained from this study could save transition economies' resources which have almost always been considered sine qua non before any critical major policymaking, while this is not necessarily true, and in many cases, even counterproductive. Originality/value – Original data set on Vietnam stock market are collected, processed, prepared and used by the authors. Original design by the authors for regression equations with dichotomous predictor variables: dependence on endowed physical assets, reliance on capital resources and significant signs of creative performance/innovations. Original idea of viewing “resource curse” as absence of innovation and due to uncreative “destructive creation” of poor-performing commercial operations by resource-rich firms is used in the paper. We have searched the literature in business research and found that the empirical results have not been previously reported.
 
Article
Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to examine the financing practices of unlisted manufacturing firms in India. In particular, the authors seek to explore how unlisted firms finance their growth and the extent to which they rely on external source of finance. Additionally, they explore whether the determinants of indebtedness that explain the borrowing behavior of listed Indian manufacturing firms are capable of explaining the financing decisions of unlisted firms as well. Design/methodology/approach – This paper uses panel data technique to determine the factors determining indebtedness of unlisted private manufacturing firms in India. Findings – Unlisted Indian manufacturing firms are largely dependent on bank borrowing for their growth, and access to finance is largely dependent on collateral capacity. The authors results show that the dominant firm factors affecting indebtedness of unlisted firms in India are asset tangibility, firm growth, size, profitability and firm age. Institutional and macroeconomic factors are also observed to be significant influencers of indebtedness. Research limitations/implications – Unavailability of financial information for the required number of years has resulted in certain firms and sectors of the economy not being included in the sample, and has, hence, affected sample size and representation. Similar problems have limited the period of the study to only four years. The study does not include unlisted services sector firms in the sample, and, hence, its findings cannot be generalized in the context of unlisted firms in India. Practical implications – There appears to be a strong case for both the policy-maker and financial economist to have a re-look at the financial constraints that unlisted firms face and redefine the role of the banks and financial institutions from being a passive provider of capital to that of a partner in ushering growth. Development of the financial intermediary sector in terms of its reach is expected to favorably influence growth of this sector. Originality/value – This paper provides empirical evidence on the alternative sources of raising outside capital and the factors determining the capital structure of unlisted manufacturing firms in India.
 
Article
Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to investigate the success rate of information system development by means of an empirical research with a focus on how various user factors. The authors examined user reactions, interactions and participation during the early, middle and late stages of an ISD project to analyze the effect of user involvement. Once the data were collected, they analyzed the effectiveness of each kind of user involvement by tying the user involvement to the final result of the corresponding project. Design/methodology/approach – This empirical research is to study 35 information system development projects, whose sample size is determined to maintain statistical confidence as well as the intensity of each interview. Findings – The authors have obtained some interesting findings as follows: user involvement itself does not improve the chance of success for an IS project; user expectations could profoundly impact the success rate of IS projects – clear user expectations in early stages significantly improve the chance of success and user expectations in late stages through user involvement do not obviously improve the chance of success; user attitude toward an IS project is much more important than user involvement; user attitude is largely influenced by effective communications from the management; corporate training and labor practices do not have significant impact on project success rate, nor does user competency; the success rate of IS projects is more relevant to decision-making approaches than to individual project management – a bottom-up approach, a transparent decision-making protocol, a positive attitude toward new ideas, a supportive corporate culture, etc.; and finally, the overall corporate culture is the single most important critical success factor for an ISD, including the overall performance of the company and the top-level management support. Research limitations/implications – Through an empirical study, this research has examined user factors of ISD in general and analyzed the efficacy of user involvement in different stages of ISD in particular. While other research results emphasize more on user involvement, the findings from this research reveal indicate that user involvement does not always effectively benefit ISD, but their involvement in the early stages of the ISD does. Furthermore, our findings indicate that effective user involvement can be achieved through psychological involvement via adequate communications rather than through participatory involvement. Practical implications – The managerial implications entailed to this research should help refocus our attention on project management and could result in more effective improvement on the success rate of an ISD. Originality/value – Through an empirical study, this research has examined user factors of ISD in general and analyzed the efficacy of user involvement in different stages of ISD in particular. While other research results emphasize more on user involvement, the findings from this research reveal indicate that user involvement does not always effectively benefit ISD, but their involvement in the early stages of the ISD does. Furthermore, our findings indicate that effective user involvement can be achieved through psychological involvement via adequate communications rather than through participatory involvement.
 
Article
Purpose – This purpose of this paper is to present a tool for facilitating personnel selection when multiple heterogeneous human resource managers use multiple criteria. Two problems result from such a situation. First, when multiple criteria are applied, it is unusual for one candidate to dominate the other candidates in all areas, which requires assigning weights to the different criteria to be able to rank the candidates. Second, in a heterogeneous selection committee, finding weights that accurately reflect the individual preferences of all members is difficult. Design/methodology/approach – To deal with the multidimensional setting of selecting personnel, this paper introduces data envelopment analysis with assurance region (DEA-AR) to determine individually optimal weights for each applicant. Findings – DEA-AR leads to a score for each applicant that can serve as a signal for productivity and, thus, for evaluating the candidate. Based on linear programming, DEA-AR not only aggregates multiple dimensions into a single score but also incorporates managers’ preferences. In addition, the procedure is transparent and fair. It seems to be highly appropriate for selecting personnel. Based on a simulated dataset of applicants, the use of DEA-AR for selecting personnel is illustrated and discussed. Originality/value – DEA-AR provides a tool for supporting personnel selection or pre-selection. This model is based on a mechanical procedure and considers managers’ ideas about weights.
 
Article
National technology development initiatives in Japan and Europe are playing an increasingly important role in many fields of research. Such heightened international activity suggests a need for a more global perspective on research administration, and raises many questions for the United States' research community and science and technology policy. (Author/MSE)
 
Article
The various long-term factors and strategies used to promote sponsored research program development at the University of Missouri-Kansas City during a five-year phase are analyzed. Implementation of a set of specific initiatives is cited as a major factor in establishing an institutional climate for change. (Author/MSE)
 
Article
A brief history of research involving humans is followed by discussion of the use of students in university research projects and institutional responsibility to students and the public. Institutions are encouraged to incorporate specific controls into research policies to avoid legal problems in the areas of contract theory, fiduciary responsibility, and ethical responsibility. (Author/DB)
 
Article
Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to propose a new multidisciplinary knowledge management (KM) model for the service sector and to explore its applicability through pilot test research. Design/methodology/approach – Construction and testing of a knowledge-based strategic model for the service industry (maturity level of knowledge usage in service organizations model – MAKUSO model). A questionnaire addressed to senior managers was developed using variables grouped into four KM constructs relating to: human and market capital, processes that facilitate KM and antecedents that contribute toward creating a total and unique service experience. Findings – The Spearman rank order correlations results confirmed the positive effects of leveraged knowledge assets, such as human and market capital, on company performance. The outcome of a principal component analysis indicated that KM needs to be considered at a strategic level to develop processes that encourage a knowledge-based strategy approach; thus the MAKUSO model was found to be a useful framework in support of this approach. Research limitations/implications – The research was limited by its exploratory nature. Use of random sampling right across the board was restrictive as was the small sample size. Practical implications – Effective use of knowledge assets creates the supportive context that enables service managers to develop unique capabilities. This context becomes conducive to service experience authenticity and thus increases customer satisfaction. The findings imply that social networking is a key driver for the effective leveraging of knowledge assets. What appears to be more important is the generation and sharing of new knowledge and less the identification, measurement and warehousing of knowledge already owned by the company. Effective KM is facilitated by “lessons learned”, especially when these are taken into account in planning. Originality/value – The model presented in this study addresses theoretical and empirical gaps in the area of services KM. Its novelty lies in its multidisciplinary and organic approach. The survey findings of the model’s application across a range of service companies provides useful insights on KM implications and raises valuable research questions for a future research agenda in services management.
 
Article
Purpose – The purpose of this study is to propose a taxonomy of meeting purpose. Meetings are a workplace activity that deserves increased attention from researchers and practitioners. Previous researchers attempted to develop typologies of meeting purpose with limited success. Through a comparison of classification methodologies, the authors consider a taxonomy as the appropriate classification scheme for meeting purpose. The authors then utilize the developed taxonomy to investigate the frequency with which a representative sample of working adults engaged in meetings of these varying purposes. Their proposed taxonomy provides relevant classifications for future research on meetings as well and serves as a useful tool for managers seeking to use and evaluate the effectiveness of meetings within their organizations. Design/methodology/approach – This study employs an inductive methodology using discourse analysis of qualitative meeting descriptions to develop a taxonomy of meeting purpose. The authors discourse analysis utilizes open-ended survey responses from a sample of working adults ( n = 491). Findings – The authors categorical analysis of open-ended questions resulted in a 16-category taxonomy of meeting purpose. The two most prevalent meeting purpose categories in this sample were “to discuss ongoing projects” at 11.6 per cent and “to routinely discuss the state of the business” at 10.8 per cent. The two least common meeting purpose categories in this sample were “to brainstorm for ideas or solutions” at 3.3 per cent and “to discuss productivity and efficiencies” at 3.7 per cent. The taxonomy was analyzed across organizational type and employee job level to identify differences between those important organizational and employee characteristics. Research limitations/implications – The data suggested that meetings were institutionalized in organizations, making them useful at identifying differences between organizations as well as differences in employees in terms of scope of responsibility. Researchers and managers should consider the purposes for which they call meetings and how that manifests their overarching organizational focus, structure and goals. Originality/value – This is the first study to overtly attempt to categorize the various purposes for which meetings are held. Further, this study develops a taxonomy of meeting purposes that will prove useful for investigating the different types of meeting purposes in a broad range of organizational types and structures.
 
Article
The author uses Peter Drucker's framework as a social ecologist to identify changes that have already happened in our understanding of human nature and the impact that they are likely to have on the practice and theory of management. He suggests that the emerging concepts of ecological rationality and embodied cognition will lead a return to Aristotle's concept of phronesis or practical wisdom. This will allow a new discussion of the concept and role of power in organizations. Ethics, judgement and prudence will once again become central to the field.
 
Article
Purpose – This study examined how proactive environmental management affects firm performance and whether a controlling family moderates this effect. The paper aims to discuss these issues. Design/methodology/approach – The study adopted content analysis to collect data on listed Taiwanese firms and used cross-sectional regression analysis to examine the relationship between proactive environmental management and firm performance as well as the moderating role of a controlling family. Findings – The results indicated that not all types of proactive environmental management are positively associated with firm performance and that a controlling family might be more effective in low-risk proactive environmental management practices. Research limitations/implications – The focus was on the impact of proactive environmental management from the perspective of stockholders. Future research could investigate its impact on other stakeholders as well. Practical implications – The findings might convince managers that the stereotype of an environment-friendly firm – that the more its green initiatives, the less competitive it becomes – may not necessarily be true. Investing in product-focused pollution prevention could increase revenues and improve performance. Even though process-focused pollution prevention is negatively associated with firm performance, companies are not expected to reduce investment in green processes since they are required for the production of environment-friendly products. Originality/value – This study adopted a multi-dimensional approach to reveal how different types of proactive environmental management affect firm performance. The authors used the controlling family as a moderating variable to determine whether it moderates the relationship between proactive environmental management and firm performance.
 
Article
Purpose ‐ Outsourcing of information technology jobs outside the USA has resulted in social costs in the form of mass layoffs and displaced workers. The purpose of this paper is to show the social cost of outsourcing from a transaction cost economics (TCE) perspective. Design/methodology/approach ‐ The paper analyses the incidences of mass layoffs in sectors prone to outsourcing and its consequences on displaced workers. Mass Layoff Statistics (MLS) and the Displaced Workers Survey (DWS) data generated by the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), USA, between 1996 and 2010, are examined for this purpose. Findings ‐ Outsourcing as a reason for mass layoffs has continued to persist up until 2010. Displaced workers experienced earnings losses after job losses and reemployment. The more educated workers had higher post displacement reemployment rates, while older persons suffered the most earnings losses. Research limitations/implications ‐ The data pertain to the period 1996 to 2010, including the "Dot Com Bubble Bust" and the "Great Recession." Changes in data collection methods by BLS over this time period makes it difficult to compare some of the data. Practical implications ‐ For policy makers, managers and workers, this study focuses attention on the outsourcing by information technology dependent sectors and the accompanying social costs in the form of displaced workers. Originality/value ‐ Most papers focus on the efficiency gains of outsourcing but this paper focuses attention on the social cost of outsourcing, which is under-researched and often overlooked.
 
Article
Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to investigate the moderating role of the emphasis placed by individuals on scheduling of activities on the relationship between task structure and work outcomes (i.e. job satisfaction and job involvement). Design/methodology/approach – Data were collected using surveys from 387 employees working in US‐based organizations. Regression analyses were used to test the hypothesized relationships. Findings – The results of the study show that for individuals who place high emphasis on scheduling of work and non‐work activities, the negative impact of highly structured tasks was weaker than for individuals who do not emphasize scheduling of activities. The results also provide support for the hypotheses concerning the direct relationships between task structure and work outcomes. Originality/value – Past research has largely ignored the role of individual differences in examining task structure. By providing empirical support for the moderating role of emphasis on scheduling on the task structure outcome relationships, this study not only paves the way for future studies but also emphasizes the importance of incorporating the role of time in examining task structure.
 
Article
The creative industry in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) has witnessed a resurgence in recent years, especially in terms of music and dance. From Nigeria and Ghana to Botswana, Kenya, Mozambique, and South Africa, and following in the footsteps of film, music and dance have now attracted global attention having featured prominently in Western media such as CNN and the BBC. Indeed, a recent BBC documentary “Best Night club in Africa” profiled Botswana as a country where the youth of SSA have found an alternative art form– i.e. outdoor music festivals such as the “carpark pimping” arising from the restrictive government taxes on entertainment in that country–described as a “tax on sin”.
 
Conceptual model
Path structural model
Sampling procedure
Discriminant validity
Article
Purpose In rapidly changing global village, individuals, organizations and the society are faced with various unforeseen challenges every day, and these challenges continuously trigger and test the instincts for survival, and higher education is of no exception. In the context of today’s most critical uncertainty, i.e. COVID-19, the purpose of this study is to highlight the significance of two leadership styles, i.e. adaptive and academic leadership, and assessing readiness for change among higher education institutions (HEIs) of Punjab, Pakistan. Design/methodology/approach An online survey was conducted to collect data from 404 permanent faculty members in the public sector universities identified using stratified random sampling. The hypotheses developed were tested using co-variance-based structural equation modeling. Findings As per the findings, both leadership styles as exogenous constructs and the presence of organizational learning capability as mediators contributed positively in crafting organizational readiness for change (ORC) among HEIs in the course of unpredictable circumstances. Practical implications The COVID-19 episode globally has reiterated the importance of change, and the role of leadership in this regard cannot be undermined. This study, for that matter, stresses on the importance and benefits of academic and adaptive leadership dealing with uncertainties or change and the readiness of HEIs for change. Several institutions faced challenges in doing so, and the transition was not smooth, except for institutions where leaders were the differentiating factor. On top of it, institutions that had timely invested in digital systems and had enhanced organizations learning capacity survived in these turbulent times. Originality/value COVID-19 has placed tremendous challenges on HEIs to adapt with the rapidly changing conditions. Hence, this study is unique in understanding the academic and adaptive leadership styles in context of ORC. This study further helps in understanding that how public sector universities that are already influenced by stringent bureaucratic structures react to change.
 
Article
Purpose This study aims to examine how members of Gen Z are impacted by Covid-19, specifically focusing on their professional opportunities, work preferences and future outlook. Design/methodology/approach A survey consisting of 24 questions including a Likert scale, multiple choice and open-ended was created to understand how members of Gen Z perceive Covid-19 impacting their education, employment, mental health and relationships. The survey was disseminated to employees of a corporate restaurant franchise, Christian college admissions and guidance non-profit, and online through social media including Instagram, Facebook, Reddit and LinkedIn. A total of 517 respondents completed the survey. Survey participants came from 29 states and 6 countries. Findings Results highlight Gen Z overwhelmingly values interpersonal connections, wants to Zoom less and work more in-person. The findings help anticipate potential professional gaps due to Covid-19 restrictions, as well as point out how Gen Z is markedly different in terms of workforce trends. Content analysis from an open-ended question reveals the extent of disruption Gen Z has experienced, adversely affecting their career plans and stalling professional development. Yet, despite these setbacks, Gen Z maintains a cautiously optimistic future outlook. Research limitations/implications Limitations to the study include the sample is largely comprising White women so the generalizability of results may be limited and the self-reporting nature of the survey may pose problems with method variance. Practical implications These findings have implications for Millennials as managers as they identify where resources should be invested including strengthening interpersonal communication skills, providing mentoring opportunities and appealing to their financial conservatism to recruit and retain Gen Z employees. The changes in telecommuting preferences and desire for more interpersonal and in-person communication opportunities highlight how Gen Z is markedly different than previous generations. Social implications Gen Z’s optimistic future outlook conveys a sense of resilience and strength in the face of stress. Rather than engaging in cognitive distortions and over generalizations when stressed, results show Gen Z is able to find healthy alternatives and maintain optimism in the face of stress. Additionally, due to the extent of isolation and loneliness Gen Zers reported, the value of in-person connections cannot be overstated. As results convey a sense of being overlooked and missing out on so many rites of passage, inviting Gen Zers to share how they have been impacted, recognizing their accomplishments and listening to them may go a long way to develop rapport. Originality/value This study differs from others because it takes a generational look at Covid-19 impacts. The qualitative nature allows us to hear from members of Gen Z in their own words, and as a generational cohort, their voices inform workplace attitudes, practices and managerial procedures.
 
Article
Purpose This paper aims to examine the impact of deregulation on the European transport industry in the form of privatization, on the managerial efficiency of a panel of deregulated transport companies. Design/methodology/approach This research examines a data set of 25 deregulated transport companies from a sample of 12 EU nations from 1988 to 2015. Some studies have analyzed deregulation by using non-parametric models. However, only a limited number of studies focus on the impact of deregulation on the managerial efficiency. This study answers two questions: whether deregulation, in the form of privatization, in the transport sector has any effect on the managerial efficiency, on the profitability and on the investment decisions of the firm, and whether this premise is robust enough across the European transport industry. This study formulates a multivariate regression framework utilizing data from major privatized European transport companies. The final panel includes 25 companies, from 12 EU - Member States for the period 1988-2015, equaling 375 firm-year observations based on a rigorous selection methodology. Findings The study confirms that transport companies, post-privatization, are more efficient regarding operating efficiency and profitability. The authors find no evidence that deregulation improves investment efficiency. Social implications The study addresses the regulators’ dilemma, whether to deregulate, by focusing on analyzing the improvement of the managerial efficiency. Originality/value This study contributes to the transport industry management literature in three ways. First, the authors update the literature of the economic theory of regulation with an empirical examination which covers the latest years across the EU Member States. Second, the authors introduce a comparison of the effects of deregulation on different components of the managerial efficiency, namely, investment, profitability and operating efficiency of the incumbents in the EU transport industry. Third, they examine deregulation by using two approaches: a traditional one where deregulation is a dummy variable assessing the overall effect on incumbents’ efficiency performance; and a novel approach where the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development’s deregulation index is used to measure the regulation intensity, accounting also for industry-wide impact assessment. This two-sided approach increases the robustness of the results.
 
Article
Purpose ‐ The purpose of this paper is to introduce a collection of articles representing the best papers and invited contributions from attendees at the 4th Annual Global Drucker Forum, an international conference focused on future challenges facing management. Design/methodology/approach ‐ The recent financial crisis has presented twin challenges confronting the next generation of management: a transformation toward a new environment in which market-driven efficiency and the concern for a functioning society are better aligned, and the nature of management practice that successfully addresses this alignment. Dimensions of these challenges are discussed in five articles in this special issue. This summary of the articles and underlying themes is provided by a professor whose teaching and research focus on strategy and entrepreneurship in free markets. Findings ‐ The articles in this issue discuss the need in organizations for adaptive flexibility, new ways of thinking, leadership behaviour at the individual and system level, and systems thinking to overcome short termism. Themes underlying these challenges include the challenges of managing in the present for the future, the need to create a learning organization, and the complexity of managing holistically. Research limitations/implications ‐ The paper suggests themes that might benefit from future management research. Originality/value ‐ This paper summarizes cutting-edge issues for management that were discussed at a recent international conference, and synthesizes six authors' research contributions that address dimensions of these issues.
 
Article
Purpose This paper aims to review the literature on “E-fulfillment” with respect to marketing and operations issues in the current dynamic and complex e-tailing environment and thereby generate significant insights. Design/methodology/approach This paper is based on a systematic literature review on e-fulfillment focusing on marketing and operations issues therein. This systematic literature review consists of a critical review on e-fulfillment under planning (review question initialisation), searching (literature search), screening (literature evaluation), extraction and synthesis and reporting phases to conceptualise e-fulfillment. A total of 122 research articles have been reviewed to explore e-fulfillment and to develop key constructs and propositions. Findings This review provides the following three outcomes. First, the varied-fulfillment definitions have been critically reviewed, leading to synthesis, and thereby, an e-fulfillment definition is provided. Further, the variations for e-fulfillment across product types, which have been identified as a key variable for e-fulfillment, have been explored. Second, authors find five e-fulfillment components at the marketing and operations interface: website quality, customisation strategy, distribution strategy, last mile delivery and return management. Continuing with the e-fulfillment interface with marketing, the linkages between e-fulfillment and select post-purchase consumer behaviours measures across different product types have been reviewed. The paper thus with a focus on synthesising e-fulfillment literature from a process perspective emphasises the consumer behaviour metric for measuring e-fulfillment performance. Practical implications This study would help academicians, researchers, e-tailers and practitioners to understand e-fulfillment from a process perspective. For the researcher, it presents areas for future research by giving possible research directions in this emerging area. This study also brings out the impact of e-fulfillment according to product type on the post-purchase consumer behaviour measures, which will help e-tailers to link e-fulfillment to consumer behaviour metrics. Originality/value The paper classifies the fragmented literature to develop constructs and propositions for e-fulfillment. This is the first kind of study on e-fulfillment process and its impact on select post-purchase consumer behaviour measures across product types.
 
Article
Purpose This paper aims to investigate the impact of corporate governance, as measured by the Corporate Governance Index, on firm performance and dividend payouts during the financial crisis of 2008. Design/methodology/approach The empirical approach followed in the study involved constructing a comprehensive measure of corporate governance for 298 non-financial companies listed on the Warsaw Stock Exchange in the years 2006-2010. Findings The results show that prior to the crisis, there was a positive association between corporate governance and performance as measured by Tobin’s q. Moreover, the study presents evidence that higher corporate governance leads to an increase in cash dividends. Amid the financial crisis, corporate governance was positively associated with a higher return on assets, yet this was not observed when measured by Tobin’s q. Additionally, during this period, better-governed companies paid dividends less generously than firms with lower corporate governance standards did. Originality/value The study provides new evidence on the impact of corporate governance on firm performance and valuation in an emerging market during the financial crisis. Moreover, the study shows that governance mechanisms operate differently in crisis and non-crisis periods.
 
Article
María-Laura Franco-García is a Senior Researcher on environmental voluntary policy strategies, sustainable co-created products by BoP’s and social responsibility of SMEs at CSTM-Twente Centre of Studies in Technology and Sustainable Development, University of Twente, The Netherlands. Former Director of Academic Department and Master’s Programme of Sustainable Development Sciences at the “Instituto Tecnológico y de Estudios Superiores de Monterrey”, Mexico. Post-doctorate in Hokkaido University, Japan; PhD and Master’s degrees on environmental science obtained at the “Institute Nationale des Sciences Appliquées” in Lyon, France. Environmental Engineer by training at the Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana in Mexico City. The contribution of industrial parks to regional development has been the driving force for some companies to geographically cluster together under some political programs. “Sustainable industrial parks” framed the research done by Edgardo Bastida-Ruiz, María-Laura Franco-García and Isabel Kreiner in their paper entitled: “Analysis of indicators to evaluate the industrial parks contribution to sustainable development: Mexican case”. In this paper, the authors suggested a sustainability indicators framework for industrial parks in contexts where information is weakly reliable or insufficient. In order to provide a more realistic (measurable) set of sustainability indicators for the Mexican context and more specifically for Mexican industrial parks located in the central region, the authors firstly carried out an analysis of secondary information sources for matching sustainability indicators with available related data which is reported by companies along their certification processes. The main purpose of doing this was to construct the indicators framework that was explored empirically in the second phase of this research. During this phase, the authors validated such framework by means of surveys and interviews to gather the perceptions of Mexican business managers about the list of prior selected United Nations indicators (Kreiner et al., 2011), these were coupled to available certifications in Mexico. By promoting sustainability measures within industrial parks, authors equally recommended to enable collaborative conditions among actors from industries, governments, industrial park organisations, chambers of commerce and local communities.
 
Article
Purpose The paper aims to present a systematic literature review to analyze interrelated enablers of Industry 4.0 for implementation. Industry 4.0 is an integrated manufacturing strategy embedded with disruptive technologies. Adapting these technologies with the present industrial scenario is dependent on understanding the dynamics of various critical enablers in the existing literature. In this paper, an effort has been taken to validate and reinforce these enablers by experts in the field of Industry 4.0 for implementation. Design/methodology/approach A mixed-methodology is designed in this paper. A text mining approach with an expert’s linguistic assessment method is planned to discover the enablers from literature 2010 to 2019. The most critical enablers and their dependencies on other enablers are studied by using correlation analysis. Findings The research explores the power driving enablers in three groups: technology, features and requirements for implementing Industry 4.0 in the existing factory. In each group, a high degree of associated and dependent enablers is fragmented in detail. Practical implications This paper will benefit the research communities and practitioners to understand the significance of an integrated ecosystem of Industry 4.0 technologies, features and requirements for implementation. Originality/value The text mining approach integrated with expert’s linguistic assessment to explore the pairwise relationship among the enablers using word correlation is a novel approach in this paper. Moreover, to best of the authors’ knowledge, this is the first-ever attempt to conduct a structured literature review combined with text analysis and linguistic assessment to identify the enablers of Industry 4.0 for implementation.
 
Article
Purpose study aims to investigate the implementation and impact of a just-in-time (JIT) system in a food manufacturing and exporting company in Thailand. Design/methodology/approach At the company, the authors used an anomaly case study. The authors performed content analysis on the data collected through semi-structured interviews and direct observations to determine operational flows through customer order, production and delivery. The authors constructed a framework that helped in mapping current operations and subsequently assessing JIT’s impacts; the authors reported the best practices to the company’s owner. Based on the follow-up after a year, the authors used an abductive approach to refine the JIT theory using data from case organizations and relevant studies. Findings The company encountered errors and delays in international delivery owing to inadequate inputs resulting from uncertain agricultural production, delayed contact with freight forwarders, improper documentation and insufficient staffing. Besides the highly centralized system, the limitations of the JIT philosophy contributed to the issues, thereby increasing mental and physical health problems and turnover rate. Owing to these paradoxical effects, the authors extended the JIT theory. Of the study’s several recommendations, the company observed only the following: contacting the freight forwarder after the purchase order confirmation, not production completion. The authors observed increased customer satisfaction, despite the additional cost of booking containers early. Originality/value This research presents a balanced JIT that can minimize JIT’s impacts and resource shortage, owing to demand-supply uncertainties and sustain competitiveness.
 
Article
Purpose This study aims to examine whether insider purchases made within 30 days prior to the publication of various kinds of press releases earn higher abnormal returns (AR) than those in the absence of such announcements. It also attempts to identify the factors that explain ARs. Design/methodology/approach This study considers data for Canadian insider purchases made on the Toronto Stock Exchange 60 Index. An event study methodology is used to calculate AR, and a mixed regression model is used to evaluate the effect of corporate news on AR. Findings The empirical results indicate that insiders achieve greater ARs when they purchase stock prior to press releases; findings also show that these returns are specifically related to purchases made before the announcements of mergers and acquisitions, ongoing projects, financial structure, financial results and asset disposals. This is because of the firm effect. Practical implications These findings have important implications for Canadian market regulatory authorities, especially the Ontario Securities Commission and other market participants who are interested in corporate governance, such as boards of directors and shareholders. Originality/value The present findings show that regulatory bodies must work with companies to raise awareness of improper insider trading.
 
Article
Purpose The purpose of this study is investigating the influence of leadership on work engagement. The definition of leadership is primarily couched in culturally masculine terms (and known as an agentic leadership style) that disfavours women, who are often perceived as being communal leaders who are compassionate and humble. The research gap addressed is whether communal and agentic leadership styles of female leaders have positive associations with work engagement. Design/methodology/approach A quantitative study was undertaken by applying purposive non-probability sampling and using an online survey with screening questions to ensure the respondent reported to a senior female manager. The survey consisted of reliable and valid Likert scales: agentic and communal leadership styles were assessed using the Agency-Communion-Inventory (AC-IN) scale with 20 questions and the Utrecht Work Engagement Scale (UWES-9) with three sub-scales: vigour, dedication and absorption. The 153 usable responses in this study were used to conduct validity and reliability tests and to apply multiple regression to test associations. Findings Both agentic and communal leadership have a positive impact on work engagement when exhibited by a female. Although agentic leadership had an influence on all the elements of work engagement, communal leadership had a far stronger impact. Originality/value Female managers with communal leadership styles need to realise that they have more influence on their employees’ emotional, physical and cognitive connections to their work than female managers with agentic leadership styles. Those with agentic leadership styles need to exhibit a communal style as well, so as to enhance the influence they have on their employees’ work engagement.
 
Standardized path estimates 
Article
Purpose This study investigates the micro-level antecedents of absorptive capacity (ACAP) based on the multilevel perspective of learning capabilities in asymmetric joint project engineering teams constituted by local employees and expatriate. Design/methodology/approach We integrated the micro-foundational and multilevel learning theories to delineate the individual and team dimensions of ACAP. Using structural equation modelling, we tested the hypothesized relationships among the underlying individual determinants and multilevel dimensions of ACAP. The data was collected from a sample of 248 local employees from 76 joint project engineering teams in the Nigerian upstream oil industry. Findings ACAP entails individual and team capabilities, which depend on prior experience and need for cognition. The creation of shared understanding is essential for the transition of individual’s knowledge assimilation capability into team’s knowledge utilization capability. Originality/value This study contributes to extant understanding of the multilevel perspective of learning capabilities, i.e., ACAP in a knowledge intensive team like joint project engineering.
 
Article
Purpose Drawing on the social exchange theory, this study aims to investigate the destructive impact of abusive supervision and supervisor undermining on quiescent silence and turnover intentions among frontline employees. Whether quiescent silence and the desire to seek revenge mediate the path from aggressive supervisory behaviors to turnover intentions is explored. Design/methodology/approach Following a time-lagged design, the authors collected data from 350 frontline banking officers in Thailand by a survey. For data analysis purposes, structural equation modeling procedures are used through Smart partial least square version 3.2.0. Findings Uniquely, findings suggest that abusive supervision does not result in any form of retaliation. Supervisor undermining has a trickle-down effect on the desire to revenge, quiescent silence and turnover intentions. For supervisor undermining, the direct path, as well as mediating roles are supported by data. Practical implications The findings of this study suggests organizational systems should discourage supervisors from undermining the subordinates. There is a need to offer regular training to supervisors. Furthermore, employees should be provided some platforms and the freedom to positively speak at work. Above all, supervisors should be more inspiring which can dilute negative perceptions of abuse. Originality/value The proposed mediation of desire to revenge and quiescent silence is unique to this study. Moreover, the challenge to the traditional trickle-down effects of abusive supervision is a unique intervention in the organizational behavior literature.
 
Article
Purpose Drawing from conservation of resources (COR) theory, this study aims to explain why certain voice types prevail while other voice types are inhibited in the presence of abusive supervision. Design/methodology/approach This paper surveys extant literature on abusive supervision, employee voice and COR theory and provides propositions linking abusive supervision and types of voice behaviours. Findings The paper develops a conceptual model linking abusive supervision and three types of subordinate voice behaviours – prosocial, defensive and acquiescent voices. It identifies psychological distress as a mediator and locus of control as a moderator to this relationship. Originality/value This paper deepens our present understanding of abusive supervision and voice relationship by explaining why only certain voice types prevail with abusive supervision while others do not. While extant literature concluded abusive supervision only as an inhibitor of voice behaviours, the present study identifies how abusive supervision could both inhibit and motivate different voice behaviours. Further, it links abusive supervision to multiple voice types, diverting from extant literature linking abusive supervision to only constructive voice. Lastly, this study contributes to resource acquisition strategies within COR theory.
 
Article
Purpose Competition for space in peer-reviewed academic journals, together with a plethora of changes in the academic publishing processes, including, for example, open access publishing, the internationalisation of the publishing community, predatory publishing and the increasing role of journal ranking systems presents challenges for early career researchers (ECRs). The purpose of this paper is to offer practical advice on getting published in business and management. Design/methodology/approach The stages in the publishing journey are identified. The journey commences with the articulation of a contribution and building relationships with supervisors and other researchers. It then moves on to the evaluation and selection of appropriate journals (including consideration of open access publishing options), publishing policies and ethics, writing and revising the article and submitting and subsequently revising your article in response to reviewers’ comments. Findings This paper concludes with an acknowledgement of the shifting nature of journal publication processes and contexts and the need for doctoral and ECRs to continue to monitor changes in journal publication practices. Originality/value Whilst other articles and publisher web pages offer advice on getting published in specific journals and disciplines, few provide a rounded perspective of the experience of publishing and how this can be navigated successfully.
 
Article
Purpose The frequent turnover of academic instructors (lecturers) to other organizations and countries despite the autonomies their job offer them necessitated; this study aims to examine the relationship between job crafting (JC) and embeddedness of lecturers to their jobs. Design/methodology/approach A survey research design was adopted. This study is carried out in the south-east region of Nigeria. The population of the study consisted of 8,051 academic staff of six randomly selected public universities in the region and a sample size of 367 was determined using Krejcie and Morgan (1970) formula. The primary and secondary source of data were used in data collection and were analysed using regression analysis at a 5% level of significance. Findings Result revealed that task crafting has a statistically significant positive relationship with employee job fit ( r = 0.949, R ² = 0.900, F = 2699.473, p -value < 0.05), that relational crafting has a statistically significant positive influence on employee links ( r = 0.982, R ² = 0.964, F = 8112.281, p -value < 0.05) and that there is a statistically significant positive correlation between cognitive crafting and sacrifice links ( r = 0.962, R ² = 0.926, F = 3729.900, p -value < 0.05). Practical implications This study’s practical implication is that it will aid in making academics in Nigeria embedded in their jobs by encouraging them to craft their jobs so as to give them more meaning. In the field of research, this study helps to close the literature gap existing in JC and the role it plays in embedding academics in their jobs, hence, opening up a whole new research area with empirical data to back it up. For management, the study will help in knowing how to appropriately harness the potential of JC in making employees more engaged in their jobs. Originality/value Many studies have been carried out in the past in areas of JC and employee performance, non to the best knowledge of the researchers has been extended to studying JC as it relates to the embeddedness of academics to their jobs in Nigeria, this study is, therefore, a new addition to academic literature in this area.
 
Research model with path coefficient and its significance (in bracket)
Article
Purpose This paper aims to examine the influence of academic repatriates’ perceived organizational support, adjustment and external employment opportunity on their intention to leave. Design/methodology/approach The data were collected from Sri Lankan academics who returned to their home university after completing their work (teaching/research) abroad. The repatriates who involved in teaching and research for one or more years abroad were included in this survey. Findings Results indicated that repatriates’ both the perceived organizational support had an important role to play in the prediction of repatriation adjustment and intention to leave. In turn, academics who adjusted to their repatriation better were highly likely to stay at their home university. In addition, repatriates’ perceived organizational support decreased their intention to leave through adjustment. In addition, when repatriates had trouble in adjustment and perceived high external employment opportunities, they reported higher intentions to leave the university than those who perceived fewer external employment opportunities. Research limitations/implications This study relied on cross-sectional and self-reported data and was conducted with small number of sample (112). Practical implications For the academic institutions, this study will help to clarify their role in managing repatriation adjustment and develop appropriate organizational systems that can facilitate repatriates to better adjust to their repatriation which, in turn, reduces their intention to leave. This study signifies the role of management in retaining repatriates. Originality/value This study further contributes to the current discussion on repatriation and moves this discussion to academic repatriates. This study, particularly, discusses the issues of retaining repatriates in a Sri Lankan context as a developing country where attracting and retaining academic repatriates are more challenging tasks for universities.
 
Article
Purpose Arab female academics struggle to advance within their universities in both academic and managerial ranks. Accordingly, this study aims to investigate the factors hindering Arab women’s academic career development through studying the case of Jordanian academic women. Design/methodology/approach Data were gathered through document analysis (Jordan constitution, Jordanian Labour Law and its amendments, higher education and scientific research law, Jordanian universities’ law and universities’ HR policies and regulations), interviews with 20 female academics and a focus group with 13 female academics (members of the Association of Jordanian Female Academics). Findings The results indicate female academics as tokens facing many interconnected and interrelated barriers embodied in cultural, social, economic and legal factors. The findings support the general argument proposed in human resource management (HRM) literature regarding the influence of culture on HRM practices and also propose that the influence of culture extends to having an impact on HR policies’ formulation as well as the formal legal system. Originality/value The influence of culture on women’s career development and various HR practices is well established in HR literature. But the findings of this study present a further pressure of culture. HR policies and other regulations were found to be formulated in the crucible of national culture. Legalizing discriminatory issues deepens the stereotypical pictures of women, emphasizing the domestic role of women and making it harder to break the glass ceiling and old-boy network.
 
Article
Purpose ‐ The purpose of this paper is to discuss the influence of Peter Drucker's ideas in the academy. Design/methodology/approach ‐ The author presents a profile of Peter Drucker, discussing his ideas and his relationship with the scholarly community. Findings ‐ Peter Drucker was not particularly fond of the academic world and served in a non-traditional role in the academy. Yet his prolific writing and methodological rigor has impacted generations of scholars and practicing managers. His work constantly looked to the future, identified crucial emerging trends that would affect management, thought and worked in a trans-disciplinary fashion, and focused on practical implications that would make a difference. Research limitations/implications ‐ The paper suggests new approaches to consider, to enhance academic engagement with practice. Originality/value ‐ This paper points out the significant contributions that Peter Drucker made to management thinking and research.
 
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Jennifer Rowley
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Veronica Liljander
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Johanna Gummerus
  • Hanken School of Economics
Minna Pura
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Manfred Bruhn
  • University of Basel