Journal of the Kansas Entomological Society

Online ISSN: 1937-2353
Publications
Thesis
Abundance and spatial distribution of macroinvertebrates were examined along a thermal gradient formed by a Poncha Hot Spring effluent in Chaffee Co., Colorado on September 21, 1991. The water temperature varied from 52.5'C in the source pool to 29.7'C at a distance of 55 m from the source pool. The study area was divided into eight consecutive five meter long stations. The most abundant macroinvertebrates were the biting midges (Diptera, Ceratopogonidae). Other abundant taxa included midges, damselflies, scuds, seed shrimp, water mites, and nematodes. The spatial distribution of macroinvertebrates was affected by the water temperature, with increasing temperatures causing decreasing abundance. A comparison of abundance and biomass along the thermal gradient resulted in two different patterns. The number of macroinvertebrates had a curvilinear relationship to temperature, while macroinvertebrate biomass had a curved relationship to temperature. From September, 1991, through Februaary, 1992, the migration patterns of Hyalella azteca Saussure (Crustacea, Amphipoda), Argia vivida Hagen (Odonata, Coenagrionidae), Chimarra utahensis Ross (Trichoptera, Philopotamidae), and Paracymus sp. (Coleoptera, Hydrophilidae) were studied. Only H. azteca, A. vivida, and Paracymus sp. were shown to migrate up the thermal gradient for the entire six month study period. Thesis (M.S.)--University of Southern Colorado, 1992. Bibliography: p. 97-106.
 
Dimensions of measured structures: (A) (a-f) leg; (B) (g-i) supra-fronto-orbital (SFO) seta (of male C. capitata and C. catoirii); and (j-k) wings of male (C) and female (D) C. catoirii. and male (E) and female (F) C. rosa. a?length femur; b?length tibia; c?length longest tibial seta; d?length brush of tibial setae (only the most basal, most distal, and longest setae are drawn); e?length tibia from base of brush; f?length longest femoral seta; g?widest portion of tip on left side of center line; h?length of seta; i?widest portion of tip on right side of center line (width of tip = g + i); j?width of wing; k?length of wing. The area of the discal (DB) + apical band (SAB) (1) on the wing was measured; two other bands, the anterior apical band (2) and the posterior apical band (3) were not measured. Scale bars are 0.2 mm for leg (A), 0.1 mm for bristle (B), and 1.0 mm for wings (C-F).  
Article
Sexual dimorphisms in four related species of tephritid flies were shown to be associated with differences in sexual behavior. In two species, Ceratitis capitata and C. catoirii, males and females approach closely head to head and apparently touch aristae, and the male buzzes his wings, probably fanning pheromone toward the female; the males were found to have longer aristae with fewer microsetae, and larger posterior areas of their wings than do females. These dimorphisms were absent in the other two species, C. rosa and Neoceratitis cyanescens, which court at a longer distance and in which the male does not fan pheromone toward the female prior to mounting. All three pairs of legs were proportionally longer in the males of all four species. None of the other sexually dimorphic male signalling traits showed the positive allometric slopes predicted by some theories.
 
Chilamblyopinus piceus Ashe and Timm, habitus.  
Article
Taxonomic history of staphylinid beetles of the tribe Amblyopinini is discussed. Chilamblyopinus piceus, a distinctive new genus and species, is described and illustrations of diagnostic characters are provided. A key to currently recognized genera in the Amblyopinini is provided. A preliminary reevaluation of relationships among genera currently included in the Amblyopinini suggests that substantial changes in the classification may be required. Myotyphlus, which occurs in the Australian region, shares derived characters both with some members of the genus Quedius, which occur in the Australian region and with the amblyopinine genus Edrabius, which occurs in the Neotropics, as do all other amblyopinines. The monophyly of the lineage which includes these two genera is uncertain. Few characters other than structural reductions and association with mammalian hosts suggest that Myotyphlus and Edrabius are a part of a monophyletic lineage with other South American amblyopinines. In contrast, Amblyopinodes, Amblyopinus, Chilamblyopinus, and Megamblyopinus form a well supported monophyletic lineage of strictly South and Central American taxa. Chilamblyopinus appears to be the most basally derived. Megamblyopinus is a sister group to Amblyopinodes and Amblyopinus. Amblyopinodes is highly autapomorphic; however, Amblyopinus cannot be shown to be monophyletic, and may be a paraphyletic taxon in relation to Amblyopinodes. Additional characters and a more firmly established outgroup for the Amblyopinini as a whole are required for resolution of these problems.
 
Article
Larval staphylinids collected from the nest of the Chilean tuco-tuco, Ctenomys maulinus brunneus, are presumed to be those of an undescribed species of Edrabius, adults of which are known to occur on this host. These larvae are described and illustrations are provided for their identification. The larvae are characteristic of the subfamily Staphylininae; however, they do not have a combination of characteristics which allows unambiguous placement into one of the described tribes of this subfamily. Edrabius larvae share the greatest number of characteristics with larvae of the tribe Staphylinini, and, among these, with members of the subtribe Xanthopygina. Importantly, they differ from larvae of the tribe Quediini, to which the amblyopinines were believed to be related, in a number of significant ways. However, Edrabius may not be a part of a monophyletic lineage with the remainder of the South American amblyopinines.
 
Article
Nesting and associated behaviors of Andrena (Plastandrena) prunorum Cockerell were studied at two sites in western Washington: a suburban lawn and a vacant lot. A maximum of five nests, usually well separated from one another, was found at a given site and year. Nest and cell structure at both sites were similar, but cell depth differed markedly between sites, and between years at one site. All nests were multi-cellular. Provision masses were flattened spheres of pollen moistened to a doughy consistency. The curved egg was placed atop the provision mass with both ends contacting it. A brief description of larval feeding is provided. Andrena prunorum and its Nomada parasite overwinter as adults. Nests, cell, provision mass, egg placement, and a feeding larva are illustrated. Information on mating, female foraging behavior, and local pollen sources are given. Adult phenology and the possibility of two generations per year are discussed. Nomada sp. nr. calloxantha Ckll. parasitized A. prunorum at one site and larval feeding by the cleptoparasite is described.
 
Article
The invasive cerambycid, Anoplophora glabripennis (Motchulsky) (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae), is native to Asia, and threatens numerous species of host trees in Europe and North America. The eradication of breeding populations depends on surveys of host trees, but the suitability of potential hosts has not been measured. Our experiment demonstrates a rapid method to assess the suitability of potential host trees. We compared weight gain over one month by 80 larvae reared in freshly cut logs of eight common hardwood species found in the areas of infestation. From the largest percent weight gain to the smallest, the resulting ranking was Chinese elm, Norway maple, American elm, honeylocust, sugar maple, red oak, white ash, green ash. Although comparisons suggested similar growth by larvae taken from diet to those reared on twigs, larvae from China grew at a greater rate than larvae originating from the Chicago infestation. This technique can be used to rapidly quantify host suitability and identify trap trees to be used for replanting after removal of infested trees.
 
Article
In tropical primary forest and its buffer zones in North Vietnam, nests of three stingless bee species were studied: Lisotrigona carpenteri Engel, Trigona (Tetragonula) laeviceps Smith and Trigona (Lepidotrigona) ventralis Smith. We record nest architecture, adult population, the number of brood cells, the presence of adult reproductives, the proportion of males in the brood, the number of queen cells and storage pots, and other features, on the basis of 35 field collected nests. Lisotrigona carpenteri and T. laeviceps arrange brood cells in clusters, T. ventralis, in horizontal combs surrounded by an involucrum of multiple lamellae. Lisotrigona carpenteri constructs its small nests (up to 400 adult bees) mainly in crevices in man-made structures while colonies of T. laeviceps (up to 1200 adults) and T. ventralis (up to 10,000 adults) are generally in cavities in living trees. The flexibility for using nest substrates other than living trees appears in these species related to colony size
 
Article
To date, only a single species of Dennyus (Ctenodennyus) has been described, this being D. (C.) spiniger Ewing from Cypseloides niger borealis (Kennedy), the northern black swift in North America. Through extensive collecting of lice by the junior author from swiftlets and through a loan of Bishop Museum material, we have obtained a small number of lice representing 2 new species of this subgenus. Here we redescribe D. spiniger and describe and illustrate these 2 new species. Journal Article
 
Article
A new acantha species-group is erected in the genus Euhesma Michener. Three new species are described: E. acantha, E. loorea, and E. collaris. Scanning electron micrographs and line drawings illustrate the species-group and a key to females enables the separation of species. Known distributions are mapped.
 
Article
Thesis (M.A.)--University of Kansas, Entomology. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 35-37).
 
Article
Geomydoecus dalgleishi n. sp. is described and illustrated for material off Geomys personatus fuscus from southern Texas.
 
Article
Eleven accessions of maize from Peru were previously identified as resistant to leaf feeding by European corn borer, Ostrinia nubilalis (Hubner) (Lepidoptera: Crambidae). A study was conducted to determine the mechanism of resistance. The weight of larvae fed Peruvian maize leaf material was not significantly different from larvae fed a resistant check, CI31A, indicating antibiosis in the Peruvian maize was at a level equivalent to CI31A. The inbred, CI31A, contained high levels of DIMBOA, thus having strong nonpreference and antibiosis properties toward leaf feeding by European corn borer. The rate of larvae leaving artificially infested Peruvian maize plants over a 5-day period was significantly less than CI31A but significantly more than a susceptible check, WF9, indicating nonpreference was a possible mechanism of resistance in the Peruvian maize but at a level lower than CI31A. When Peruvian maize leaf whorl material was added to a standard European corn borer rearing diet, the effects of the resistance factor were lost. The standard diet ingredients may have masked the effect of the resistance factor. Another possibility may be that the resistance factor was a deficiency of a vital nutrient needed for normal European corn borer development. This nutrient may have been supplied to the insect when the standard diet ingredients were added to the Peruvian maize leaf material. Further study in this area is needed to identify the basis of resistance.
 
Article
Periodical cicadas, known for strict life-cycle lengths of 13 or 17 yr, actually exhibit developmental plasticity in cycle length. This variation tends to occur in 1- A nd 4-yr increments for both life-cycle types, with the largest events involving 4-yr accelerations of the 17-yr species. The pattern has stimulated hypotheses to explain brood formation and life-cycle evolution, but most of the evidence is anecdotal. We present the first quantitative evidence confirming that a site with a 4-yr acceleration does not necessarily experience comparable emergence in the following year, and we provide the first density estimate for a 4-yr early emergence of 17-yr cicadas (1.28/m², within the range of published estimates for on-schedule emergences). We also document a 4-yr early 13-yr emergence-cicadas apparently emerging in 9 yr. Multimodal life-cycle patterns spanning-4 to +4 yr are evident in both 13- A nd 17-yr cicadas.
 
Article
Partial DNA sequences of the mitochondrial 16S ribosomal RNA and NADH 1 dehydrogenase genes (831 bp) were determined for 7 species of the parasitic wasp genus Cotesia, including all three members of the Cotesia flavipes species complex. Cladistic analysis was used to infer a phylogenetic tree and examine the relationships among members of the C. flavipes complex. The DNA sequences were also used to determine the extent of sequence variation among members of the complex in order to evaluate the specific status of each of the three species. Unweighted parsimony analysis indicated that the C. flavipes complex is monophyletic and that C. chilonis and C. sesamiae are more closely related to each other with respect to C. flavipes. However, we were unable to confirm that C. chilonis and C. sesamiae are in fact separate species as only ~1% sequence divergence was observed in a pairwise comparison of the DNA sequences for these two species. A list of potentially useful diagnostic characters is presented.
 
Map of European part of Turkey and the general view of the study area and the stream in (200 hectares).
Putoniella pruni galls on different parts of Prunus spinosa leaves and midge larvae marked by circles. The larvae are typically orange in color.
Article
Gall specimens on leaves and branches of Rosa canina and Prunus spinosa were investigated. Field studies were conducted from February to June 2013 in European part of Turkey (Trakya University Arboretum, Edirne). In the study, from the galls collected from R. canina leaves and shoots, seven parasitoid and inquiline (Hymenoptera) species (Eupelmus urozonus, Exeristes roborator, Glyphomerus stigma, Orthopelma mediator, Pteromalus bedeguaris, Torymus bedeguaris, and Periclistus brandtii, belonging five families) associated with the three gall wasp (Hymenoptera) species (Diplolepis mayri, D. rosae, D. spinosissimae, belonging one family) were recorded. From the galls on P. spinosa leaves, one gall midge (Diptera) species (Putoniella pruni) was recorded. In addition, six species were determined as new records for the dipteran and hymenopteran fauna of Edirne province, European part of Turkey, and Turkey.
 
Article
The parasitoid complex of white-spotted pinion Cosmia diffinis (Linnaeus, 1767) larvae (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) feeding on Ulmus minor in Edirne was studied during the twoyear period of 2007-2008. The determined parasitoids were Meteorus colon (Haliday, 1835) and Meteorus rufus (DeGeer, 1778) from Braconidae; Gelis areator (Panzer, 1804), Itoplectis clavicornis (Thomson, 1889) and Phobocampe lymantriae Gupta, 1983 from Ichneumonidae; Brachymeria secundaria (Ruschka, 1922) from Chalcididae; Euplectrus lìparidis Ferrière, 1941 from Eulophidae and members of Tachinidae. We report here a new host-parasitoid relationship of C. diffinis with M. colon, M. rufus, I. clavicornis, P. lymantriae, and E. liparidis. The hyperparasitism of G areator and B. secundaria on parasitoid Meteorus species of Cosmia diffinis is also reported. In addition, M. colon, I. clavicornis, G. areator, P. lymantriae and E. liparidis were determined as new records for Turkey.
 
Article
Neochlamisus gibbosus (Fabricius) is a common leaf beetle in eastern and central North America (Karren, 1972). We provide detailed illustrated descriptions of each life stage based on field studies of a population on its host plant, Rubus laudatus Berger (Rosaceae), in Kansas, U.S.A. We found some previous diagnostic characters and some new ones can diagnose the species. We report two hymenopteran parasitoids, Cottura sp. (Chalcididae) and Testrastichus sp. (Eulophidae), and one unidentified mite species on the juvenile defensive fecal case. Chemical analysis of the fecal case and host plant found little overlap in chemicals, suggesting that the beetles are manufacturing their own chemicals.
 
Article
The aim of this study was to identify the nest materials, some physical characteristics and the essential composition of the nest of Vespa crabro germanaChrist, 1791. Nest surfaces were observed with a stereomicroscope and a scanning electron microscope. In the inner surface of the V. c. germana nest, the medium thicknesses of the fibers in the envelope and comb varied between 5.30 and 11.90 µm with an average of 9.07 µm. In the outer surface of the nest, the medium thicknesses of the fibers in the envelope and comb were between 4.46 and 11.40 µm with an average of 7.68 µm. The nitrogen and protein concentration of the nest was 0.22 and 1.40%, respectively. The percentages of the fibers, saliva, oil and the water absorption capacity were calculated as 70-75, 25-30, 16-20 and 120-150, respectively. The amount of the elements nickel and copper in the nest was found to be 0.6 and 1.2 ppm, respectively. The major components of the nest were plant fibers, saliva and oil. Consequently, we have found that the ratios and the amounts of physical characteristics, the element composition and the fibers in the envelope and comb of the nest changed with environmental conditions.
 
Article
Diversity in Peru: 17 subfamilies, 221 genera, 877 species (confirmed). Recognition: Staphylinidae or rove beetles range in size from 1–35 mm (most are 2–8 mm) and vary greatly in shape from very compact to extremely slender or even antlike, but most may be recognized by having more or less truncate elytra (exposing one to many abdominal tergites), six or seven visible abdominal sternites, and contiguous procoxae which vary in shape but are often prominent and conical. The antennae are usually 11–segmented and filiform to weakly clavate (rarely with a loose to compact antennal club or reduced segmentation), and tarsi are often five– segmented but may have only four, three or two segments or various heteromerous combinations. Some members possess paired ocelli dorsally on the head. Habitat: Rove beetles can be found almost everywhere beetles occur, from seashore to alpine grasslands (e.g., Thayer, 2005). They are especially abundant in forest habitats, including in leaf litter and rotting logs, on fungi and vegetation, and attracted to dung and other decaying materials, and in non-forested moist habitats such as marine beaches and near lakes, rivers and bogs. They tend to be scarce in arid and curtivated or other highly disturbed habitats. A majority of species are predators of other invertebrates as adults and larvae, but many are saprophages or mycophages, and some feed on algae or pollen, but virtually none feed on living green plants. Many species are inquilines of social insects, especially ants and termites, and these are often well integrated with their host societies (e.g., Kistner, 1982), but some species are found in vertebrate nests or even, in one group, are commensals living on the bodies of small mammals (Seevers, 1955). Some species of the genus Paederus Fabricius in Peru (and elsewhere) have a toxic chemical, pederin, in their haemolymph that can cause severe dermatitis or lesions in humans (known locally as “dermatitis purulenta”, internationally as “Paederus dermatitis” or “linear dermatitis”) and thus are of medical and even economic importance (e.g., Ojeda
 
Article
This third segment in the Beetles of Peru follows from beetle families presented in preceding issues of this journal. This segment presents two chrysomeloid families, Megalopodinae and Chrysomelidae, and Riphiphoridae, Cantharidae, Nosodendridae, Dermestidae, and Bostrichidae. Chrysomelidae in Peru number 1724 species, making it the most speciose of all the beetle families in Peru. More beetle families will be presented in upcoming issues of this journal.
 
Article
This third segment in the Beetles of Peru follows from beetle families presented in preceding issues of this journal. This segment presents two chrysomeloid families, Megalopodinae and Chrysomelidae, and Riphiphoridae, Cantharidae, Nosodendridae, Dermestidae, and Bostrichidae. Chrysomelidae in Peru number 1724 species, making it the most speciose of all the beetle families in Peru. More beetle families will be presented in upcoming issues of this journal.
 
Article
A checklist of the ptinid beetles (including Anobiidae) of Peru is presented with 5 subfamilies, 22 genera, and 33 identified species. One species, Calymmaderus funki Pic, is reported as a new country record. Six genera are reported as new records for Peru (i.e. Byrrhodes, Caenocara, Mirosternus, Petalium, and Cryptorama), however, species within these genera are not yet identified. This contribution is part of the 'Beetles of Peru' project.
 
Representatives of blister beetle genera distributed in Peru: A. Spastica klugi; B. Cissites maculata; C. Nemognatha chrysomeloides; D. Zonitis elegans; E. Meloetyphlus fuscatus; F. Tetraonyx peruviana; G. Epicauta anthracina; H. Lyttomeloe saulcyi; I. Parameloe alatus; J. Spastomeloe formosus; K. Lyttamorpha reichenbachi; L. Pseudomeloe collegialis; M. Pseudopyrota sanguinithorax; N. Pyrota vittigera.  
Article
This paper represents the first survey of the Meloidae Gyllenhal, 1810 (Coleoptera) of Peru. All three recognized subfamilies (Eleticinae, Nemognathinae, Meloinae) and seven tribes are represented in the Peruvian fauna. Sixty-four named species are recorded in this checklist based primarily on literature and museum records, 41 (64%) of which are possibly endemic. Two species, Tetraonyx chevrolati Haag-Rutenberg and Pyrota vittigera Blanchard, are recorded from Peru for the first time. The status of the taxonomic knowledge of South American Meloidae is also briefly reviewed.
 
Article
Fifty-four species of Anthicidae in five subfamilies and ten genera are listed for Peru, with ten species being newly recorded from Peru and fourteen species known only from Peru at this time. Additionally the data for 25 species that are either undescribed or unplaceable at this time are recorded.
 
Article
The genus CopteraSay, 1836 is firstly reported from China. Two new species from Yunnan Province, C. spina Hou, Yang & Xu, n. sp. and C. yunnanica Hou, Yang & Xu, n. sp., are described and illustrated. A key to the Chinese species is provided.
 
Article
Diversity in Peru: 2 subfamilies, 2 genera, 2 species. Recognition: Members of Ptiliidae may be recognized by their extremely small size (usually in the 0.5–1.5 mm range), the clubbed antennae whose antennomeres each contain a whorl of long apical setae, and the feather-like hind wings (strap-like membrane with fringe of extremely long hairs). The elytra often incompletely cover the abdomen. Habitat: Ptiliidae occur most often in moist, decaying organic matter (rotten wood, mammal nests, dung, tree holes, seaweed piles, leaf litter) or fungi. Some species are adapted for life in ant or termite nests. Notes: Apparently only one species has been recorded from Peru (from Hall, 2003). These poorly-studied beetles are almost certainly very diverse in Peru. In our survey of the arthropod fauna of phytotelmata Zingiberales plants (Jalinsky et al., 2014), we found ptiliid adults accounting for 47% of the total adult beetle fauna in the floral phytotelmata of Calathea and Heliconia plants. Here we report Acrotrichis as an additional genus: PERU: Madre de Dios Dept., CICRA Field Station, ,50 m W on Tr. 1, 12.569211uS, 70.100261uW, 27 m, 9.VI.2011, ex leaf roll, Heliconia stricta, Jalinksy, Radocy, Wertenberger, PER-11-JJ-007 [1, SEMC].
 
Article
This paper summarizes the known information for the Chelonariidae fauna of Peru as part of the Beetles of Peru project. Eleven species of Chelonarium are known in Peru.
 
Article
The pupal case of the robber fly Archilestris magnificus (Walker, 1854) from Arizona, U.S.A. is described and images are provided for recognition. Characters of the pupal case indicate that this species can be included in the Dasypogoninae as previously placed.
 
Top-cited authors
Jim Cane
  • Agric. Research Service (and soon... WildBeecology)
S. Bradleigh Vinson
  • Texas A&M University
David Roubik
  • Smithsonian Institution
William Eberhard
  • Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute
Gordon William Frankie
  • University of California, Berkeley