Journal of the International Neuropsychological Society

Published by Cambridge University Press (CUP)
Online ISSN: 1469-7661
Publications
Clinical status at 2-year follow-up as a function of group at entry. F/U 5 follow-up; CDR 5 Clinical Dementia Rating scale. 
Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve for the combined predictors of the hierarchical model for discrimination of stable mild cognitive impairment patients and those who progressed to dementia.
Demographic and baseline clinical characteristics of the participants who had 2-year follow-ups
Article
Impairments in executive cognition (EC) may be predictive of incident dementia in patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI). The present study examined whether specific EC tests could predict which MCI individuals progress from a Clinical Dementia Rating (CDR) score of 0.5 to a score ≥1 over a 2-year period. Eighteen clinical and experimental EC measures were administered at baseline to 104 MCI patients (amnestic and non-amnestic, single- and multiple-domain) recruited from clinical and research settings. Demographic characteristics, screening cognitive measures and measures of everyday functioning at baseline were also considered as potential predictors. Over the 2-year period, 18% of the MCI individuals progressed to CDR ≥ 1, 73.1% remained stable (CDR = 0.5), and 4.5% reverted to normal (CDR = 0). Multiple-domain MCI participants had higher rates of progression to dementia than single-domain, but amnestic and non-amnestic MCIs had similar rates of conversion. Only three EC measures were predictive of subsequent cognitive and functional decline at the univariate level, but they failed to independently predict progression to dementia after adjusting for demographic, other cognitive characteristics, and measures of everyday functioning. Decline over 2 years was best predicted by informant ratings of subtle functional impairments and lower baseline scores on memory, category fluency, and constructional praxis.
 
Article
Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS) is characterized by lung injury and hypoxemia, has a high mortality rate, and is associated with significant morbidity including cognitive and emotional sequelae and decreased quality of life. There is limited information regarding which of these factors are associated with decreased quality of life. This study assessed the relationships between quality of life, cognitive and emotional function in ARDS survivors at 1-year post-hospital discharge. Sixty-six ARDS survivors were administered a battery of neuropsychological tests, measures of emotional function and quality of life 1 year post-hospital discharge. At 1 year 45% of the ARDS patients had cognitive sequelae and 29% had mild to moderate symptoms of depression and anxiety. Depression, anxiety, and intensive care unit length of stay were significantly correlated with decreased quality of life. Cognitive impairments did not correlate with decreased quality of life. Illness severity and emotional function, but not cognitive sequelae, are associated with decreased quality of life 1 year following ARDS. ARDS is common and may result in significant cognitive and emotional morbidity and decreased quality of life.
 
Article
This study investigated the role of visuospatial tasks in identifying cognitive decline in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD), by correlating neuropsychological performance with cerebral perfusion measures. There were 157 participants: 29 neurologically healthy controls (age: 70.3 +/- 6.6, MMSE > or = 27), 86 patients with mild AD (age: 69.18 +/- 8.28, MMSE > or = 21) and 42 patients moderate/severe AD (age: 68.86 +/- 10.69, MMSE 8-20). Single Photon Emission Computerized Tomography (SPECT) was used to derive regional perfusion ratios, and correlated using partial least squares (PLS) with neuropsychological test scores from the Benton Line Orientation (BLO) and the Rey-Osterrieth Complex Figure (RO). Cross-sectional analysis demonstrated that mean scores differed in accordance with disease status: control group (BLO 25.5, RO 33.3); mild AD (BLO 20.1, RO 25.5); moderate/severe AD (BLO 10.7, RO 16). Correlations were observed between BLO/RO and right parietal SPECT regions in the AD groups. Visuospatial performance, often undersampled in cognitive batteries for AD, is clearly impaired even in mild AD and correlates with functional deficits as indexed by cerebral perfusion ratios on SPECT implicating right hemisphere circuits. Furthermore, PLS reveals that usual spatial tasks probe a distributed brain network in both hemispheres including many areas targeted by early AD pathology.
 
Interaction effects between task condition and group on the Spatial N-back Task. The accuracy of the obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) group deteriorated disproportionately in the 2-back condition as compared to the healthy control group. Error bars represent standard error of each data point. 
Summary of studies on reversibility of executive defi cits in OSA after CPAP with a healthy control group
Interaction effects between task condition and group on working memory span. The proportion of sentences verifi ed by the obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) group deteriorated disproportionately in the dual condition as compared to the healthy control group. Error bars represent standard error of each data point. 
Group demographic characteristics and OSA group medical history OSA group ( N = 37) Range Controls ( N = 27) Range
Working memory task performance of the treated OSA group and the control group OSA group ( N = 37) Controls ( N = 27) Effect size ( d )
Article
Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is characterized by disrupted breathing and hypoxemia during sleep, daytime sleepiness, and changes in cognition and mood. One important question is regarding the reversibility of cognitive deficits after treatment with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP). Here, we report the outcomes of CPAP treatment as measured by tests of attention and executive function. Thirty-seven individuals with moderate to severe OSA and compliant on CPAP treatment were studied with working memory tasks, neuropsychological testing, and overnight polysomnographic sleep study and compared to 27 healthy controls. CPAP improved the respiratory disturbance index, minimum and mean oxygen saturation (SpO2), subjective sleep quality, and daytime sleepiness ratings compared to pre-treatment values. In terms of current neurocognitive function, treated individuals with OSA performed at a comparable level to controls on basic working memory storage functions but still showed a significant reduction on tests of working memory requiring the central executive. The OSA group also performed worse on neuropsychological measures of complex attention, executive function, and psychomotor speed. While CPAP is an effective treatment for OSA in terms of ameliorating breathing disruption and oxygen desaturation during sleep, as well as daytime sleepiness, some cognitive deficits may be more resistant to treatment.
 
Article
Ecstasy (MDMA) is a popular drug that can act as a selective serotonin neurotoxin in several species. The goal of the present study was to examine the relationship between ecstasy exposure and cognitive functioning after controlling for other drug use and demographic variables. Furthermore, we assessed whether gender was a moderator of the relationship between cognitive functioning and ecstasy use. Data were collected from 31 men and 34 women with a wide range of ecstasy use (17 marijuana users with no ecstasy use and 48 ecstasy users ranging from low to heavy use). Participants were interviewed and administered a battery of neuropsychological tests. The primary finding was that ecstasy exposure was significantly related to poorer verbal learning and memory ability in a dose-dependent manner, while no such relationship was observed between ecstasy exposure and executive functioning or attentional ability. Gender was found to significantly moderate the relationship between ecstasy consumption and design fluency. These results suggest primary memory dysfunction among abstinent recreational ecstasy users. This finding is consistent with reports of hippocampal vulnerability, particularly among heavy users.
 
Frequency of 41 unweighted effect sizes across 39 studies. 
Severity indices of the 39 studies included in the meta-analysis 
Effect sizes for the nine cognitive domains 
Article
There continues to be debate about the long-term neuropsychological impact of mild traumatic brain injury (MTBI). A meta-analysis of the relevant literature was conducted to determine the impact of MTBI across nine cognitive domains. The analysis was based on 39 studies involving 1463 cases of MTBI and 1191 control cases. The overall effect of MTBI on neuropsychological functioning was moderate (d = .54). However, findings were moderated by cognitive domain, time since injury, patient characteristics, and sampling methods. Acute effects (less than 3 months postinjury) of MTBI were greatest for delayed memory and fluency (d = 1.03 and .89, respectively). In unselected or prospective samples, the overall analysis revealed no residual neuropsychological impairment by 3 months postinjury (d = .04). In contrast, clinic-based samples and samples including participants in litigation were associated with greater cognitive sequelae of MTBI (d = .74 and .78, respectively at 3 months or greater). Indeed, litigation was associated with stable or worsening of cognitive functioning over time. The implications and limitations of these findings are discussed.
 
Predictors of domain-specific cognitive change-univariate analyses for preselection of predictor variables 
Predictors of domain-specific cognitive change-multivariate analyses 
Article
The objective of this study is to examine the prognosis of acute cognitive disorders post-stroke, and to evaluate which clinical factors predict domain-specific cognitive recovery. We followed the course of cognitive functioning in 111 stroke patients and 77 healthy controls by administering two neuropsychological examinations with a 6 to 10 month interval (mean interval, 7.5 +/- 1.3 months). The baseline examination was administered within three weeks post-stroke (mean interval, 7.9 +/- 4.2 days). To examine determinants of domain-specific cognitive recovery, we recorded vascular risk factors, clinical variables, and lesion characteristics. Recovery in visual perception/construction (83%) and visual memory (78%) was the most common. An acute cognitive disorder predicted a long-term disorder in the same domain (all p < .05), except for visual perception/construction. Factors associated with poor cognitive recovery were age (all p < .01), preexistent verbal ability (all p < .005), lesion locations involving the temporal (all p < .05), frontal (p < .05) and occipital lobe (allp < .05), lesion volume (p < or = .001), and diabetes mellitus (p < .01). An early neuropsychological examination provides valuable information on long-term cognitive performance. The prognosis of higher-level visual disorders is the most favorable. Cognitive recovery is associated with age, preexistent ability, lesion volume, lesion location, and diabetes mellitus.
 
Article
Arterial spin labeling (ASL) uses magnetic resonance imaging methods to measure cerebral blood flow (CBF) non-invasively. ASL CBF validly localizes brain function and may be especially useful for studies where the time frame of behavioral change is more than a few minutes, such as in longitudinal and treatment studies. ASL measures of cerebral perfusion are highly accurate in detecting lesion laterality in temporal lobe epilepsy, stenotic-occlusive disease, and brain tumors. Among lesioned patients, ASL CBF has excellent concurrent validity when correlated with CBF measured by Positron Emission Tomography or with dynamic susceptibility-weighted magnetic resonance. ASL CBF can predict tumor grading in vivo and can predict six-month response to the surgical treatment of brain tumors. ASL's capability to selectively and non-invasively tag flow in major vessels may refine the monitoring of treatment of cerebrovascular disease and brain tumors. Conclusions about the utility of ASL are limited by the small sample sizes of the studies currently in the literature and by the uncertainty caused by the effect of brain disease on transit times of the magnetic tag. As the method evolves, ASL techniques will likely become more widely used in clinical research and practice.
 
Mean net advantageous card selections for each block of trials on the Iowa Gambling Task for high, medium, and low impulsive individuals. High impulsive (HI) individuals made significantly fewer net advantageous selections than low (LI) and middle (MI) impulsive individuals during the final block of trials [F(2,57) 5 10.728, p , .001]. 
Article
Impulsivity has been identified as a behavioral precursor to addiction, and may be the manifestation of a neurological vulnerability. The present study investigated whether individual differences in impulsivity were associated with performance on the Iowa Gambling Task (IGT, a test of emotional decision making thought to be associated in part with ventromedial prefrontal cortex function) and the Wisconsin Card Sorting Task (WCST, a set-shifting thought to be associated in part with dorsolateral prefrontal cortex function). Subjects were screened for impulsivity using the BIS-11 (self-report) and a delay discounting questionnaire (a behavioral measure of impulsivity). High impulsivity was associated with poorer performance on the final block of trials of the IGT but was not significantly related to WCST performance. Both measures were significantly correlated with scores on the BIS. These results provide support for hypothesis that, in a nonclinical sample, impulsivity may vary systematically with performance on neuropsychological indicators of prefrontal function.
 
Article
The catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) Val158Met polymorphism modulates executive functions and working memory and recent neuroimaging studies implicate an association with emotional processing. We examined the relationship between the COMT Val158Met polymorphism and facial emotion recognition and differentiation in 100 healthy individuals. Compared to Met homozygosity, Val homozygosity was associated with better and faster recognition of negative facial expressions such as anger and sad. Our study provides evidence for a possible influence of the COMT polymorphism on emotion recognition abilities in healthy subjects. Additional research is needed to further define the neurocognitive phenotypes associated with COMT polymorphisms.
 
Article
Decision making in an emotionally conflicting situation is important in social life. We aimed to address the similarity and disparity of neural correlates involved in processing ambivalent stimuli in patients with schizophrenia and patients with depression. Behavioral task-related hemodynamic responses were measured using [15O]H2O positron emission tomography (PET) in 12 patients with schizophrenia and 12 patients with depression. The task was a modified word-stem completion task, which was designed to evoke ambivalence in forced and non-forced choice conditions. The prefrontal cortex and the cerebellum were found to show increased activity in the healthy control group. In the schizophrenia group, activity in these two regions was negligible. In the depression group, the pattern of activity was altered and a functional compensatory recruitment of the inferior parietal regions was suggested. The prefrontal cortex seems to be associated with the cognitive control to resolve the conflict toward the ambivalent stimuli, whereas the cerebellum reflects the sustained working memory to search for compromise alternatives. The deficit of cerebellar activation in the schizophrenia group might underlie the inability to search and consider compromising responses for conflict resolution.
 
Article
The interpretation of neurobehavioral change over time requires knowledge of the test-retest characteristics of the measures. Without this information it is not possible to distinguish a true change (i.e., one reflecting the occurrence or resolution of an intervening process) from that occurring on the basis of chance or systematic bias. We tested a group of 72 healthy young to middle aged adults twice over a 12-to-16-week interval in order to observe the change in scores over time when there was no known intervention. The test battery consisted of seven commonly used cognitive measures and the Profile of Mood States (POMS). Test-retest regression equations were calculated for each measure using initial performance, age, education, and a measure of general intellectual function (Wonderlic Personnel Test) as regressors. Test-retest correlations ranged from .39 (POMS Fatigue) to .89 (Digit Symbol). Cognitive measures generally yielded higher correlations than did the POMS. Univariate regressions based only on initial performance adequately predicted retest performance for the majority of measures. Age and education had a relatively minor influence. Practice effects and regression to the mean were common. These test-retest regression equations can be used to predict retest scores when there has been no known intervention. They can also be used to generate statistical statements regarding the significance of change in an individual's performance over a 12-to-16-week interval.
 
Sample characteristics (Total N 5 385) 
Means, standard deviations and ranges of standardized scores for tests and questionnaire measures with published norms 
Means and standard deviations of scores by age in years for CANTAB Subtests 
Means and standard deviations by age in years for total number of words correct for Verbal Fluency task 
Standardized parameter estimates and probability levels for effects of age, sex and socioeconomic status on raw score performance for IQ and achievement subtests 
Article
The National Institutes of Health (NIH) Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Study of Normal Brain Development is a landmark study in which structural and metabolic brain development and behavior are followed longitudinally from birth to young adulthood in a population-based sample of healthy children. The neuropsychological assessment protocol for children aged 6 to 18 years is described and normative data are presented for participants in that age range (N = 385). For many measures, raw score performance improved steeply from 6 to 10 years, decelerating during adolescence. Sex differences were documented for Block Design (male advantage), CVLT, Pegboard and Coding (female advantage). Household income predicted IQ and achievement, as well as externalizing problems and social competence, but not the other cognitive or behavioral measures. Performance of this healthy sample was generally better than published norms. This linked imaging-clinical/behavioral database will be an invaluable public resource for researchers for many years to come.
 
Accuracy results for the four trial types. Groups differed significantly in overall accuracy, with the OI group having a significantly higher proportion of correct responses. Accuracy was lowest on switched/unwitnessed trials, which are those that depend on Theory of Mind (ToM), with the Severe TBI (traumatic brain injury) group showing the largest decline in accuracy on these trials such that their performance was below chance levels. 
Article
Theory of mind (ToM) involves thinking about mental states and intentions to understand what other people know and to predict how they will act. We studied ToM in children with traumatic brain injury (TBI) and age-and gender-matched children with orthopedic injuries (OI), using a new three-frame Jack and Jill cartoon task that measures intentional thinking separate from contingent task demands. In the key ToM trials, which required intentional thinking, Jack switched a black ball from one hat to another of a different color, but Jill did not witness the switch; in the otherwise identical non-ToM trials, the switch was witnessed. Overall accuracy was higher in children with OI than in those with TBI. Children with severe TBI showed a larger decline in accuracy on ToM trials, suggesting a specific deficit in ToM among children with severe TBI. Accuracy was significantly higher on trials following errors than on trials following correct responses, suggesting that all groups monitored performance and responded to errors with increased vigilance. TBI is associated with poorer intentional processing in school-age children and adolescents relative to peers with OI; furthermore, children with TBI are challenged specifically by intentional demands, especially when their injury is severe.
 
Demographic and Injury Characteristics 
Group differences on parent-rated measures of socio-emotional functioning at 18-month post-injury, controlling for pre-injury level of functioning 
Article
A growing body of literature has documented evidence for emotion labeling (EL) deficits after traumatic brain injury (TBI); however, long-term effects of TBI on EL abilities, particularly among young children, are unclear. We investigated EL abilities and socio-emotional outcomes in 32 children with moderate-severe TBI, 23 with complicated-mild TBI, and 82 children with orthopedic injuries (OI), shortly after injury and at 18 months post-injury. All children were between 3:0 and 6:11 years of age at the time of injury. Repeated measures analyses indicated that all groups showed improved EL performance between acute and 18-month assessments, but that the moderate-severe TBI group improved at a slower rate than the OI group, so that the two groups showed significantly different performance at 18 months. Emotion labeling ability did not significantly contribute to the prediction of socio-emotional outcomes after controlling for pre-injury functioning. These results provide preliminary evidence of emerging EL deficits after early childhood TBI that are related to injury severity but that do not predict social and behavioral outcomes.
 
Article
We examined two-wave longitudinal changes in two indicators of neurocognitive speed (i.e., mean rate, intraindividual variability) using one simple and three complex reaction time tasks. Participants included idiopathic Parkinson's disease (PD) patients, with and without incipient dementia, and normal controls. At baseline, there were 45 patients (26 men, 19 women) with idiopathic PD who ranged from 65 to 84 years (M = 71.3; SD = 4.5) and 47 matched controls (27 men, 20 women) who ranged from 65 to 84 years (M = 71.4; SD = 4.9). The 18-month longitudinal sample comprised of 74 returning participants (43 controls; 31 PD patients) who had no cognitive impairment or dementia at both waves. Ten of the 31 PD patients returning for Time 3 had dementia or cognitive impairment. These constituted the PD with incipient dementia (PDID) group. Repeated measures analyses of variance showed that the PD and PDID groups were slower over time on the reaction time tasks, whereas the controls improved their performance over time on all tasks. Inconsistency distinguished the two clinical groups (i.e., the PDID group but not the PD group became more inconsistent over time). Changes in neurocognitive speed and inconsistency may be valid clinical markers of PDID.
 
Descriptive characteristics of the sample (N 5 1780) 
Continued 
Standard deviations of the residuals per VLT measure 
Article
The Verbal Learning Test (VLT; Rey, 1958) evaluates the declarative memory. Despite its extensive use, it has been difficult to establish normative data because test administration has not been uniform. The purpose of the present study was to gather normative data for the VLT for a large number (N = 1855) of healthy participants aged 24-81 years, using a procedure in which the words to be learned were presented either verbally or visually. The results showed that VLT performance decreased in an age-dependent manner from an early age. The learning capacity of younger versus older adults differed quantitatively rather than qualitatively. Females and higher educated participants outperformed males and lower educated participants over the entire age range tested. Presentation mode affected VLT performance differently: auditory presentation resulted in a better recall on Trial 1 (a short-term or working memory measure), whereas visual presentation yielded a better performance on Trial 3, Trial 4, and Delta (a learning measure).
 
Article
One of the most common chromosomal deletions is a loss of genetic material from the long arm of chromosome 18. Most individuals with this condition exhibit mental retardation (68%), yet previous attempts to link cognitive status to deletion size have not shown an association, possibly because cases with additional genetic abnormalities were included. We studied 46 participants ranging from 3 to 35 years of age who had a pure genetic abnormality by excluding those with mosaicism or complex genetic rearrangements. Our patients had terminal deletions ranging from a proximal breakpoint at 18q21.1 (greater genetic abnormality, larger deletion size) to a more distal breakpoint at 18q23 characterized with molecular genetic techniques. Cognitive ability, assessed with the age-appropriate measure (Bayley, 1993 , Differential Ability Scale, Wechsler Scales), ranged from IQ = 49 to 113, with a predominance of mild and moderate mental retardation. Using multivariate regression, deletion size breakpoint rank order was predicted by cognitive ability, age, and adaptive behavior (Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales), accounting for 36% of the variance in deletion size. However, lower cognitive ability (beta = .34, p = .032) and younger age (beta = .296, p = .024) predicted a larger deletion size, but adaptive behavior (beta = .225, p = .15) did not. An additional multivariate regression showed that cognitive ability and age together accounted for 33% of the variance in deletion size, whereas univariate regression showed that cognitive ability accounted for 26% of the variance and age accounted for 11% of the variance. These findings suggest that degree of cognitive impairment is associated with genetic abnormality when a large sample of individuals with "pure" deletions of genetic material from chromosome 18 is examined.
 
Article
Thirty codependent cocaine and alcohol users were compared with age-, education-, race-, and sex-matched cocaine abusers (N = 30) and normals (N = 30) using an extended Halstead-Reitan Neuropsychological Test Battery to determine whether cocaine abusers with alcohol dependence were more cognitively impaired than singly addicted cocaine abusers. Tests were grouped and analyzed according to 8 major ability areas. Participants who abused both cocaine and alcohol did not differ from normals on the majority of test measures. An unexpected but consistent finding was the poorer performance of the cocaine sample relative to cocaine and alcohol abusers on measures of complex psychomotor and simple motor functioning (ps < .001). Pure cocaine abusers, but not abusers of both cocaine and alcohol, also performed more poorly than normals on a measure of global neuropsychological functioning (p < .01). These results are consistent with previous reports of generally mild cognitive dysfunction in cocaine abusers. The findings also suggest that cocaine and alcohol abusers of relatively young ages may be less cognitively impaired than demographically comparable cocaine abusers. Evidence from studies of vascular functioning in abusers of cocaine and alcohol alone and in combination is discussed as possible explanation for these findings.
 
Article
A history of the early years (1965-1985) of the International Neuropsychological Society (INS) is presented. Themes than run through these years--such as the need for an organizational structure, attempts to make the Society truly international, and the involvement of the membership, especially, the "younger" members, in governance--are clearly evident. After a somewhat shaky start, the Society came of age toward the end of this formative 20-year period.
 
Article
Mutations in the progranulin (PGRN) gene have been identified as a cause of frontotemporal dementia (FTD). However, little is known about the neuropsychological abilities of asymptomatic carriers of these mutations. The aim of the study was to assess cognitive functioning in asymptomatic c.709-1G>A PGRN mutation carriers. We hypothesized that poorer neuropsychological performance could be present before the development of clinically significant FTD symptoms. Thirty-two asymptomatic first-degree relatives of FTD patients carrying the c.709-1G>A mutation served as study participants, including 13 PGRN mutation carriers (A-PGRN+) and 19 non-carriers (PGRN-). A neuropsychological battery was administered. We found that the A-PGRN+ participants obtained significantly poorer scores than PGRN- individuals on tests of attention (Trail-Making Test Part A), mental flexibility (Trail-Making Test Part B), and language (Boston Naming Test). Poorer performance on these tests in asymptomatic PGRN mutation carriers may reflect a prodromal phase preceding the onset of clinically significant symptoms of FTD. (JINS, 2012, 18, 1086-1090).
 
Article
The Journal of the International Neuropsychological Society published recently a paper that should become influential shortly. However, given its potential impact, this study has to be examined carefully.
 
Proportion of subjects performing within the impaired range of global and domain specifi c neuropsychological performance. Extensive metabolizers tend to have a greater likelihood of neuropsychological impairment than intermediate/poor metabolizers. * p < .02 † p < .10. GDS = Global Defi cit Score; Speed = Speed of information processing; Att/Wk. Mem = Attention/working memory; Verbal = Verbal fl uency; Abstr = Abstraction/problem-solving/executive functioning. 
Examples of the relationship between cytochrome P450-D6 (CYP2D6) activity and neurocognitive performance. The panel on the upper left shows increasing global impairment (GDS) with increasing CYP2D6 activity. The remaining panels show a similar relationship in learning, abstraction, processing speed. 
Methamphetamine use parameters by cytochrome P450-2D6 metabolic phenotype Mean ( SD ) or % Extensive n =32 Intermediate/poor n =20
Non-parametric correlations between neuropsychological defi cit Scores and CYP2D6 metabolic activity based on combination of alleles coded ordinally between 1 and 5
Article
While neuropsychological deficits are evident among methamphetamine (meth) addicts, they are often unrelated to meth exposure parameters such as lifetime consumption and length of abstinence. The notion that some meth users develop neuropsychological impairments while others with similar drug exposure do not, suggests that there may be individual differences in vulnerability to the neurotoxic effects of meth. One source of differential vulnerability could come from genotypic variability in metabolic clearance of meth, dependent on the activity of cytochrome P450-2D6 (CYP2D6). We compared neuropsychological performance in 52 individuals with a history of meth dependence according with their CYP2D6 phenotype. All were free of HIV or hepatitis C infection and did not meet dependence criteria for other substances. Extensive metabolizers showed worse overall neuropsychological performance and were three times as likely to be cognitively impaired as intermediate/poor metabolizers. Groups did not differ in their demographic or meth use characteristics, nor did they evidence differences in mood disorder or other substance use. This preliminary study is the first to suggest that efficient meth metabolism is associated with worse neurocognitive outcomes in humans, and implicates the products of oxidative metabolism of meth as a possible source of brain injury.
 
Rates of neuropsychological impairment among MDMA+ and MDMA− groups based on defi cit scores from demographically adjusted test T-scores, using a cut point of 0.5. Atten = Attention/Working memory, SIP = Speed of information processing, Abstr = Abstraction/Executive functioning. * p < .01. 
Demographic and MDMA use characteristics by MDMA status
Article
Neuropsychological disturbances have been reported in association with use of the recreational drug "ecstasy," or 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA), but findings have been inconsistent. We performed comprehensive neuropsychological testing examining seven ability domains in 21 MDMA users (MDMA+) and 21 matched control participants (MDMA-). Among MDMA+ participants, median [interquartile range] lifetime MDMA use was 186 [111, 516] doses, with 120 [35-365] days of abstinence. There were no significant group differences in neuropsychological performance, with the exception of the motor speed/dexterity domain in which 43% of MDMA+ were impaired compared with 5% of MDMA- participants (p = .004). Motor impairment differences were not explained by use of other substances and were unrelated to length of abstinence or lifetime number of MDMA doses. Findings provide limited evidence for neuropsychological differences between MDMA+ and MDMA- participants with the exception of motor impairments observed in the MDMA+ group. However, replication of this finding in a larger sample is warranted.
 
Article
Neuropsychology is poised for transformations of its concepts and methods, leveraging advances in neuroimaging, the human genome project, psychometric theory, and information technologies. It is argued that a paradigm shift toward evidence-based science and practice can be enabled by innovations, including (1) formal definition of neuropsychological concepts and tasks in cognitive ontologies; (2) creation of collaborative neuropsychological knowledgebases; and (3) design of Web-based assessment methods that permit free development, large-sample implementation, and dynamic refinement of neuropsychological tests and the constructs these aim to assess. This article considers these opportunities, highlights selected obstacles, and offers suggestions for stepwise progress toward these goals.
 
Article
A 31-yr-old woman demonstrated intact neuropsychological functioning after being submerged for at least 30 minutes in icy cold water. Following submersion, the patient received CPR for approximately 1 hr. Eight hours after submersion, the patient's temperature was 31 degrees C (87 degrees F). She remained nonresponsive for 2 days after the accident. Extensive neuropsychological testing was completed 3 mo after the accident with no objective or subjective deficits evidenced. This case of hypothermically mediated neuroprotection from anoxia in an adult supports the need for further research on the putative neurophysiological mechanisms invoked and the potential for application of clinically induced hypothermia in the acute management of other types of cerebral insults.
 
Article
Synaptic development and elimination are normal neurodevelopmental processes, which if altered could contribute to various neuropsychiatric disorders. 31P-1H magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) and structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) exams were conducted on 105 healthy children ages 6-18 years old to identify neuromolecular indices of synaptic development and elimination. Over the age range studied, age-related changes in high-energy phosphate (phosphocreatine), membrane phospholipid metabolism (precursors and breakdown products), and percent gray matter volume were found. These neuromolecular and structural indices of synaptic development and elimination are associated with development of several cognitive domains. Monitoring of these molecular markers is essential for devising treatment strategies for neurodevelopmental disorders.
 
Plan view of the upper level of the shopping center. Key: enclosed areas 5 shops; 'E'5 exits; 'C'5 clock; 'S'5 stalls; 'L' 5 library. Numbers refer to locations where tasks can be accomplished. Items to be purchased: bread [12]; plasters [6, 7, 12]; birthday card [1, 3, 4, 5, 7, 12]; chocolate [4, 6, 7, 8, 12]; light bulb [1, 7, 12]; key ring [1, 2, 3, 5, 9, 10, 11, 7, 12]. Information to be recorded: newspaper headline [4, L, 12]; library closing time [L]; price of tomatoes [12]; shops selling TVs [12]. Meet under clock after 20 minutes [C]. Inform examiner when completed exercise [anywhere]. 
Unweighted and weighted error scores by category and group 
Article
Shallice and Burgess (1991) reported the utility of the Multiple Errands Test (MET) in discriminating executive deficits in three frontal lobe patients with preserved high IQ, who were otherwise unimpaired on tests of executive function. The aim of this study was to ascertain the value of a simplified version of the MET (MET-SV) for use with the range of people more routinely encountered in clinical practice. Main findings were as follows: 1) The test discriminated well between neurological patients and controls, and the group effects remained when the difference in current general cognitive functions (WAIS-R FSIQ) was taken into account. 2) The best predictors of performance in the healthy control group (n = 46) were age and the number of times participants asked for help (with more requests associated with poorer performance). 3) In the neurological group, two clear patterns of failure emerged, with performance either characterized by rule breaking or failure to achieve tasks. These two patterns were associated with different dysexecutive symptoms in everyday life. 4) The patients not only made more errors than controls, but also different ones. A scoring method that took this into account markedly increased test sensitivity. 5) Many patients passed traditional tests of executive frontal lobe function but still failed the MET-SV. This pattern was strongly associated with observed dysexecutive symptoms in everyday life. The results demonstrate the clinical utility of the test, and suggest that there are two common and independent sources of failure on multitasking tests in a general neurological population: memory dysfunction, and initiation problems.
 
Representative images from the standard 3-D and fast spin-echo protocols. Left: 3-D gradient-echo (SPGR) T1-weighted series with TR 5 24 ms, TE 5 5 ms, NEX 5 2, flip angle 5 45 8 , field of view of 24 cm, section thickness of 1.2 mm, no gaps. Middle: coronal section, TR 5 3000 ms, TE 5 17 ms, ET 5 4; Right: spatially registered coronal section TR 5 3800 ms, TE 5 102 ms, ET 5 8; for both sets field of view was 24 cm, section thickness 4 mm, no gaps (interleaved). 
Sample tissue segmented images with segmented gray matter within the defined frontal lobe highlighted in black in the top row, and the MTL gray matter highlighted in black in the bottom row. Nonfrontal 0 MTL gray matter is light gray and white matter is darker gray. Note that only four of the approximately forty-two, 4-mm resliced sections were chosen for presentation of each structure. 
Article
Previous studies conducted by our group have provided evidence for age-related reductions in cortical thickness in dorsal frontal and parietal regions between childhood and adulthood, and gray matter volume increases of mesial temporal and anterior diencephalic structures. The purpose of this study was to describe neurobehavioral correlates of these brain maturational changes using morphometric analyses of brain magnetic resonance images (MRI) and two tests of cognitive abilities. Participants were 35 normal children roughly stratified by age (7 to 16 years) and sex (20 boys and 15 girls) and frontal and mesial temporal regions were anatomically defined in each subjects' MRI data. The California Verbal Learning Test-Children's Version and the Rey-Osterrieth Complex Figure test were used as measures of verbal and visuospatial memory and organizational abilities. Analyses designed to show regionally specific relationships between the brain and behavioral measures revealed interesting results. Specifically, frontal lobe gray matter thinning was more strongly predictive of delayed verbal memory functioning than was the mesial temporal lobe gray matter volume, and this relationship did not appear to be mediated by factors indexed in chronological age. Similar, but less regionally specific relationships were observed for measures of visuospatial memory abilities and frontal lobe maturation. Functional imaging studies in the literature consistently report activation in frontal regions in adults during retrieval tasks. The relationship between frontal lobe maturation and delayed recall observed here may be reflective of the children's development towards the more adult-like frontal lobe function revealed in the functional imaging studies.
 
Article
A major use of neuropsychological assessment is to measure changes in functioning over time; that is, to determine whether a difference in test performance indicates a real change in the individual or just chance variation. Using 7 illustrative test measures and retest data from 384 neurologically stable adults, this paper compares different methods of predicting retest scores, and of determining whether observed changes in performance are unusual. The methods include the Reliable Change Index, with and without correction for practice effect, and models based upon simple and multiple regression. For all test variables, the most powerful predictor of follow-up performance was initial performance. Adding demographic variables and overall neuropsychological competence at baseline significantly but slightly improved prediction of all follow-up scores. The simple Reliable Change Index without correction for practice performed least well, with high error rates and large prediction intervals (confidence intervals). Overall prediction accuracy was similar for the other three methods; however, different models produce large differences in predicted scores for some individuals, especially those with extremes of initial test performance, overall competency, or demographics. All 5 measures from the Halstead-Reitan Battery had residual (observed--predicted score) variability that increased with poorer initial performance. Two variables showed significant nonnormality in the distribution of residuals. For accurate prediction with smallest prediction--confidence intervals, we recommend multiple regression models with attention to differential variability and nonnormality of residuals.
 
Article
We tested the validity of the 48-Pictures Test, a 2-alternative forced-choice recognition test, in detecting exaggerated memory impairments. This test maximizes subjective difficulty, through a large number of stimuli and shows minimal objective difficulty. We compared 17 suspected malingerers to 39 patients with memory impairments (6 amnesic, 15 frontal lobe dysfunctions, 18 other etiologies), and 17 normal adults instructed to simulate malingering on three memory tests: the 48-Pictures Test, the Rey Auditory Verbal Learning Test (RAVLT), and the Rey Complex Figure Test (RCFT). On the 48-Pictures Test, the clinical groups showed good recognition performance (amnesics: 85%; frontal dysfunction: 94%; other memory impairments: 97%), whereas the two simulator groups showed a poor performance (suspected malingerers: 62% correct; volunteer simulators 68% correct). The two other tests did not show a high degree of discrimination between the clinical groups and the simulator groups, except in 2 measures: the 2 simulator groups tended to show a performance decrement from the last recall trial to immediate recognition of the RAVLT and also performed better than the clinical groups on the immediate recall of the RCFT. A discriminant analysis with the latter 2 measures and the 48-Pictures Test correctly classified 96% of the participants. These results suggest that the 48-Pictures Test is a useful tool for the detection of possible simulated memory impairment and that when combined to the RAVLT recall-recognition difference score and to the immediate recall score on the RCFT can provide strong evidence of exaggerated memory impairment.
 
Article
The present study examined neuropsychological (NP) functioning and associated medical, neurological, brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and psychiatric findings in 389 nondemented males infected with Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Type 1 (HIV-1), and in 111 uninfected controls. Using a comprehensive NP test battery, we found increased rates of impairment at each successive stage of HIV infection. HIV-related NP impairment was generally mild, especially in the medically asymptomatic stage of infection, and most often affected attention, speed of information processing, and learning efficiency; this pattern is consistent with earliest involvement of subcortical or frontostriatal brain systems. NP impairment could not be explained on the bases of mood disturbance, recreational drug or alcohol use, or constitutional symptoms; by contrast, impairment in HIV-infected subjects was related to central brain atrophy on MRI, as well as to evidence of cellular immune activation and neurological abnormalities linked to the central nervous system.
 
Article
Significant anoxia may cause a variety of neuropathologic changes as well as cognitive deficits. We have recently seen 3 patients who have suffered severe anoxic episodes all with initial Glasgow Coma Scores (GCS) of 3 with sustained coma for 10-14 d. All 3 patients had extended hospitalizations and rehabilitation therapy. A neuropsychological test battery was administered and volumetric analyses of MRI scans were carried out in each case at least 6 mo postinjury. Two of the patients display distinct residual cognitive and neuropathologic changes while 1 patient made a remarkable recovery without evidence of significant morphological abnormality. These three cases demonstrate, that even with similar admission GCS, the outcome is variable and the degree of neuropsychological impairment appears to match the degree of morphologic abnormalities demonstrated by quantitative MR image analysis. An important finding of this study is that even though subjects with an anoxic insult exhibit severe cognitive and memory impairments along with concomitant morphologic changes, their attention/concentration abilities appear to be preserved. MR morphometry provides an excellent means by which neural structural changes can be quantified and compared to neuropsychological and behavioral outcomes.
 
Article
Focusing on symptoms of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in a sample obtained from the general population, we aimed to investigate the effects of incentives and event rate on reaction time (RT) performance and response inhibition. We assessed 1156 children, at a mean age of 8 years, on their performance on an inhibition task and a RT task under different experimental conditions that manipulated event rate and incentives. Children with high ADHD (ADHD-H) symptoms showed cognitive performance deficits only under some of the experimental conditions compared to a control group. The fast-incentive condition of the RT task succeeded in normalizing the RT variability, as well as the slow overall speed, in the ADHD-H group. Analyses of ADHD symptom scores as a quantitative trait in the total sample were overall consistent with these findings. The findings suggest that at least some cognitive performance deficits in children with high ADHD symptoms do not reflect stable cognitive deficits. The degree to which cognitive impairments in ADHD can be modulated by energetic or motivational factors has important implications for clinical and educational interventions.
 
Article
Previous research has examined age effects in rates of forgetting at short delay intervals of 20-30 min. The present study examined age effects in three verbal memory tasks at longer delay intervals of up to 62 days. Study participants consisted of 371 community-dwelling men and women comprising three age groups 20-39, 40-59, and 60-79 years. Age differences in acquisition and 20-min delayed recall were found on each of the memory tasks (paragraph, word list, and word pairs). However, all age groups showed equivalent rates of forgetting after this short delay interval. When participants were required to retain information for longer delay intervals (i.e., 1-62 days), increasing age was associated with faster rates of forgetting for day 1, but not over longer delay intervals. Age differences in rates of forgetting for longer delay intervals and the facilitating effects of prompted recall are discussed in terms of encoding and storage versus retrieval processes.
 
Article
Meta-analysis was used to examine the performance of depressed and Alzheimer-type dementia (DAT) patients on standard and experimental clinical tests of cognitive function. Deficits were found for depression on almost every psychological test. Relative to nondepressed controls, the average deficit was 0.63 of a standard deviation, but the magnitude of the effect varied with the type of test. DAT patients performed worse than depressed patients, with an average effect size of 1.21 standard deviations, but the size of the effect depended on the clinical test. Effect sizes for the comparison between depressives and controls were significantly affected by age, treatment setting, ECT use, severity of depression, and the source of diagnostic criteria, but not by the type of depression. Effect sizes in the comparison of depressives to DAT patients were influenced by age, the severity of depression, and ECT. Depressives performed proportionately worse than controls on tasks with pleasant or neutral, compared with unpleasant content, on speeded compared with nonspeeded tasks, and on vigilance tasks. However, there were no differences in the magnitude of effect size for tests using recall compared with recognition, using categorical compared with noncategorical word lists, on story compared with word comprehension, and using verbal compared with visual material. Relative to DAT patients, depressives performed no better on recall compared to recognition tasks, or verbal compared to visual material. The findings of the review are not consistent with the hypothesis that depression is associated with deficits in effortful processing. A model of psychological deficit in depression as a deficit in speed or attention has more promise.
 
Article
Neuropsychological deficits are commonly found to be part of depression in old age and might simultaneously represent early symptoms of dementia. We investigated the influence of depression on processing speed and executive function in subjects who did not develop dementia during the following 5 years to examine whether these neuropsychological dysfunctions are due to depression or are influenced by other causes (e.g., education, cerebral comorbidity). A total of 287 subjects aged 75 (mean: 75.76) were available for analyses. Processing speed was measured by the Trail Making Test-A, Executive Function by the Trail Making Test-B and Verbal Fluency. DSM-IV-criteria were used for diagnosing depression. Cerebral comorbidity (e.g., stroke, Parkinson's disease), sex, education, antidepressant, and/or benzodiazepine medication, and a history of depression were taken into account as covariates. Univariate analyses and multiple regression analyses were calculated. Higher education was strongly related to better performance in all three psychometric tests. Cerebral comorbidity significantly slowed TMT-A performance and reduced Verbal Fluency scores. In multiple regression analysis depression showed only a minor, slowing influence on TMT-A and TMT-B performance. Depression only had a minor influence on processing speed and executive function in this sample of nondemented subjects. By comparison, the influence of education and cerebral comorbidity was seen to be stronger.
 
Mean response latencies on the picture naming and odd/even judgment tasks in the 25-35, 50-59, 60-69, and above-70 age groups.
Demographic data of the 25-35, 50-59, 60-69 and above-70 age groups
shows mean response latencies on the picture naming and odd/even judgment tasks for the 25–35, 50–59, 60–69, and above-70 age groups. For the picture naming task, correct naming latencies were analyzed. For the odd/ even judgment task, analyses were performed on all response latencies because the error rate was very low (1.35%). Outlier latencies (more than 2 standard deviations from the mean of the latencies for the same subject) were also removed from the analyses for both tasks. We performed a mixed ANOVA with a 4 (Age group: 25–35, 50–59, 60–69, and above- 70) 3 2 (Task: picture naming task, odd/even judgment task) design on log-transformed response latencies in order both to examine the main effects of age group and task and also to investigate whether there was an interaction between these two variables. There was a significant effect of age, F(3,116) 5 129.9, p , .001; Z 2 p 5 .77. Newman-Keuls post hoc comparisons (p , .05) revealed that on the odd/even judgment task, the 25–35 and 50–59 age groups did not differ from each other, both responding faster than the 60–69 and above-70 age groups, which also did not differ from each other.  
Article
The aim of this study was to determine whether naming difficulties arise in individuals as young as their 50s. Participants of 25-35, 50-59, 60-69, and above 70 years of age were given a picture naming task. To uncover subtle naming difficulties, latencies were analyzed in addition to accuracy. To control whether the expected slower naming latencies could be due to a general slowing affecting all cognitive tasks, participants were also given an odd/even judgment task to assess cognitive processing speed. The results confirmed that participants in their 50s presented decline in naming performance, reflected by an increase in naming latencies, whereas adults in their 60s and their 70s showed both a decrease in accuracy and an increase in latency. Moreover, the increase in naming latencies remained significant even after controlling for odd/even judgment latencies, suggesting a degradation specific to the picture naming task. We assumed that these slower latencies may result from a language-specific impairment. As a further test for language-specific degradation, participants' semantic capacities were also assessed with a synonym judgment task and the Pyramids and Palm Trees test. The above-70 group showed semantic degradation. The contributions of multiple factors to naming difficulties in aging are discussed. (JINS, 2013, 19, 1-8).
 
Article
A version of the category fluency test including the categories of animal and transportation, was administered to 316 Chinese native speakers ranging in age from 7 to 95. Results indicated that the number of items generated in the category fluency test increases with age from childhood to adulthood with a peak performance in adults aged from 19 to 30, and then declines subsequently into late life. All participants, regardless of their age, generated more animal than transportation names. Educational level, but not gender, was a significant factor affecting their performance. The participants in all age groups committed very few intrusion and perseveration errors. The results of the present study were in general consistent with those reported in the western countries. Thus, it seems to be appropriate to apply the category fluency test, which was originally developed in western countries, for clinical use in Hong Kong.
 
Article
Automatic and effortful information processing in depressed patients was investigated by a visual search paradigm, in order to examine dysfunctional effortful processing in depressed patients. Twenty-one patients with major depression, according to the DSM-IV, and with a moderate depression measured by the Hamilton Rating Scale score at >18 participated in the study. The healthy control group was matched for age, gender, and level of education. Half of the trials involved only one type of distractor, and the other half of the trials involved two types of distractors being presented. The results show that the performance of the depressed patients was equal to the control group when the target was easily recognized with only one type of distractor present. However, when target detection required a more difficult and complex attentive search strategy, effortful information processing, the depressed patients needed longer visual search time compared to the controls. Depressed patients seem to have impaired performance on effortful but not automatic information processing.
 
Article
We report the adaptation of the Aachen Aphasia Test (AAT) to the Portuguese language (PAAT) and the results of its standardization in 125 persons with aphasia and 153 healthy controls. Patients with aphasia had a previous syndromic diagnosis, obtained through a Portuguese aphasia battery, which served as a reference. The control group was stratified by age and educational level. Hierarchical cluster analyses showed good construct validity. The increasing degree of difficulty and complexity throughout the item sets comprising subtests was confirmed. The discriminatory power of the PAAT for the selection of aphasic from non-aphasic persons proved to be as high as for the AAT versions in other languages. Classification of standard aphasic syndromes by means of discriminant analyses was good. Internal consistency, measured by means of Cronbach's alpha coefficient, was high to very high for the different PAAT subtests. Performance differences caused by age or educational level among the healthy control persons emphasized the need for correction factors. In conclusion, the PAAT showed robust psychometric properties, comparable to the original German and to adaptations to other languages. It constitutes a useful tool for cross-linguistic and multicenter studies.
 
Article
The detection of executive deficits in early behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD) is crucial, as impairments in the executive domain constitute an important diagnostic feature of the newly proposed diagnostic criteria for bvFTD. Our group has recently demonstrated that classical executive tests fail to detect the executive deficits of a subgroup of early bvFTD patients. When administered an executive and social cognition battery (ESCB) that includes tasks that mimic everyday scenarios (e.g., affective decision-making, planning and organization, theory of mind), however, the performance of those bvFTD patients differed significantly from that of controls. One limitation of the ESCB is its lengthy nature (approximately 90 min). For this reason, the present study analyzes the usefulness of alternative shorter versions of this battery. We propose one particular two-task combination that demands approximately 30 min for its administration and scoring, and which presents similar discriminatory accuracy as that of the complete ESCB, while maintaining its significantly superior capacity to detect subtle executive deficits in bvFTD patients relative to classical executive tests. We suggest that, in clinical settings where tools, time, or human resources are scarce, this abbreviated ESCB may be useful in the detection of subtle yet impairing executive impairments of patients with bvFTD.
 
Article
We present a case study of a 43-year-old woman with chronic and stable pure alexia. Using a multiple baseline design we report the results of two different interventions to improve reading. First, a restitutive treatment approach using an implicit semantic access strategy was attempted. This approach was designed to exploit privileged access to lexical-semantic representations and met with little success. Treatment was then switched to a substitutive treatment strategy, which involved using the patient's finger to pretend to copy the letters in words and sentences. Reading using this motor cross-cuing strategy was 100% accurate and doubled in speed after 4 weeks of intervention. We propose that this patient's inability to benefit from the implicit semantic access treatment approach may be in part related to her inability to suppress the segmental letter identification process of word recognition.
 
Task-switching protocol. The sequence of events during task-switching performance started with a tonal cue instructing subjects to switch or to repeat the classifi cation rule used in the immediately preceding trial (i.e., color or shape classifi cations). The switch/repeat meaning of the two tones (500 and 2000 Hz, 65dB) was counterbalanced between subjects. After each tonal cue, a choice card appears centered on the screen together with the four key cards on top and remained on display until a response was given. Responses were immediately followed by “correct,” “incor- rect,” “too fast,” and “too slow” feedback text written on the screen (200-ms duration). 
Descriptive statistics and S-W tests of normality
Correlation matrix
Results of multiple regression analysis on TMT-A, TMT-B, and B-A scores B SE ( B ) β t p Partial Semipartial
Article
The aim of this study was to clarify which cognitive mechanisms underlie Trail Making Test (TMT) direct and derived scores. A comprehensive review of the literature on the topic was carried out to clarify which cognitive factors had been related to TMT performance. Following the review, we explored the relative contribution from working memory, inhibition/interference control, task-switching ability, and visuomotor speed to TMT performance. Forty-one healthy old subjects participated in the study and performed a battery of neuropsychological tests including the TMT, the Digit Symbol subtest [Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale (Third Version) (WAIS-III)], a Finger Tapping Test, the Digits Forward and Backward subtests (WAIS-III), Stroop Test, and a task-switching paradigm inspired in the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test. Correlation and regression analyses were used in order to clarify the joint and unique contributions from different cognitive factors to the prediction of TMT scores. The results suggest that TMT-A requires mainly visuoperceptual abilities, TMT-B reflects primarily working memory and secondarily task-switching ability, while B-A minimizes visuoperceptual and working memory demands, providing a relatively pure indicator of executive control abilities.
 
Means and standard deviations associated with each group according to performance on the motion-defined form recognition task
Article
Among children born at extremely low birthweight (ELBW: < 1000 g at birth) there is an association between the presence of periventricular brain injury (PVBI) and lowered performance on tests of reading and spelling ability. The present study was designed to determine if this association might be related to underlying dysfunction in the subcortical magnocellular visual pathway or its cortical targets in the dorsal stream, a prediction motivated by the magnocellular theory of dyslexia. Thirty-five ELBW children were divided into two groups based upon the presence or absence of PVBI (no PVBI, n = 11; PVBI, n = 24). The performance of these two groups was compared to that of a group of healthy full term children (n = 12) on a motion-defined form recognition task believed to tap into the functioning of the magnocellular pathway and/or the dorsal stream. ELBW children did, in fact, show a striking impairment on this task, with 71% of the sample performing at a level more than three standard deviations below the mean of full term controls. Surprisingly, their difficulties were not found to be related to either the presence of brain injury (verified by neonatal cranial ultrasound) or to problems with reading or spelling. An association was documented, however, between difficulties with motion processing and performance on several subtests of the Performance IQ scale of the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children-Third Edition. This latter finding is consistent with our earlier suggestion that magnocellular pathway/dorsal stream dysfunction may underlie problems with visuospatial and visuomotor performance in this population.
 
Cortical regions of interest included in the analysis based on FreeSurfer cortical parcellation. 
Demographic characteristics and cognitive scores in controls and MCI patients (mean ± SD )
Scatterplots showing the relationship between global frontal cortical thickness and solving time in controls and mild cognitive impairment (MCI) subjects.
Cortical thickness measures (in mm) of cortical regions assessed
Article
Mild cognitive impairment (MCI) is considered a transitional state between normal aging and Alzheimer disease. Most MCI subjects present disturbances in multiple neuropsychological domains, including executive function. This study aimed at exploring frontal lobe cortical thinning in MCI and healthy controls, and its relationship with problem-solving abilities. Twenty-three MCI patients and 30 elderly controls underwent MRI and neuropsychological assessment. Cortical thickness was measured by means of FreeSurfer. Problem-solving was assessed by means of the Tower of London (TOL) task. MCI showed a global thinning of the cortex. With regard to specific regions of interest, a thinning in the left frontal lobe and the bilateral posterior cingulate gyri was found. Partial correlations, after controlling for age, education, Mini-Mental Status Examination, and non-frontal mean thickness revealed negative significant correlations between frontal lobe thickness and executive outcomes in the control group. This counterintuitive relationship was not observed in the MCI group, suggesting that the frontal cortical atrophy observed in MCI entails a specific pathology-related relationship with high-level executive outcomes that is qualitatively different from that observed in healthy aging.
 
Top-cited authors
Russell Schachar
Maureen Dennis
Jack M Fletcher
  • University of Houston
Keith Owen Yeates
  • The University of Calgary
H. Gerry Taylor
  • Case Western Reserve University