Journal of Writing in Creative Practice

Published by Intellect
Online ISSN: 1753-5190
Publications
Article
This article reports on a research project that investigated students' experiences of creativity at the University of Brighton. It found that students' creativity was effectively supported if opportunities were provided for them to identify the things within their experiences, memories and even within themselves that inspire their creativity. By developing workshops that helped to improve students' confidence and ownership of ideas, and to create spaces in which to discuss their creativity away from their assessed work, this project aimed to provide a model of best practice that would enhance students' creativity and their personal, vocational and academic development. Ultimately, the paper suggests that students' creativity is best supported by embedding workshops into the curriculum that provide opportunities for students to gather the confidence and motivation to discuss their creativity and the factors that inspire it.
 
Article
In 1998 Steve Dutton and Steve Swindells formed the artist collaboration Dutton and Swindells. In 2008 they completed a three-month artist residency programme at Ssamzie Space, Seoul, South Korea. During the residency the artists founded the Institute of Beasts by introducing live animals into the studio as members of a faculty; to suggest new readings of the work but also as a strategy to potentially generate art as a form of encounter in which different compulsions or pathologies pull in various ways but equally live together in a frame or scenario in much the same way as practice can exist as performance, text and as object. An interesting aspect of having an animal(s) in the studio is the unpredictable nature of what happens to the work when it becomes a perch, a hutch or a burrow and what happens to the artist's practice when they share a space with other animal(s). This article and accompanying images form a written/visual extension to a presentation they delivered at Writing Encounters, York St John University, 1113 September 2008.
 
Article
In this article, the approach to the Digital is based on the distinction between three levels: a theoretical level, an applicative level and an interpretative level. Now digital literary works play on the tensions between the three levels and allow these tensions to be highlighted. Studying the conjunction of the Digital and of literary creation – by analysing digital literary works – thus proves to be relevant. Looking into the specific properties of the Digital can throw light on the potentialities of digital literature; in the same way, digital literature can act as a revealer for the Digital.
 
Article
This paper focuses on the current function of academic writing for design education within Sweden. It argues that in its present form academic writing is used to explain the final result by accounting for the process, but it would be much more useful to designers if the form were modified to fit the purpose of justifying a design solution. Interpretations of the academic report as chronologically telling about the process have, in Swedish design education, resulted in muddled texts where the final results are absent or hidden in the lengthy description of the process. The academic report fulfils its function because it is a logical construction. Its form includes explication of the research-process because this process determines the reliability and/or validity of the new knowledge arrived at. An excellent design-process does not, however, guarantee excellent design: a design-solution is justified only by solving the problem. Adjusted to this purpose, academic writing could become a useful tool, helping students to grasp which explicit reasons and grounds may support their definition of the problem, outline how their design may be a solution to it, and also show where reasons and grounds may prove to be poor. Writing, in a modified academic form, can become a useful and integrated tool in design education, primarily if the intellectual skill developed through this writing is useful also for the practitioner.
 
Three-layered framework of text production in Higher Education. 
Article
Research degrees are a recent phenomenon in the emergent academic design disciplines, and design practitioners and academics still debate their characteristics. Practice-based degrees may incorporate studio and other project work as part of the submission and the dissertation may exhibit variation in the visual and textual modes employed. The production of hybrid practice-based dissertation genres has consequences for research, supervision and writing pedagogies. The academic literacies approach stresses the need for students, faculty, and others to acknowledge the fundamentally underdetermined forms and conventions of dissertation writing and to work together for greater transparency in giving and getting feedback. If design fields wish to pursue the hybrid genres that practice-led project incorporating projects demand, a relevant writing pedagogy must be developed which looks beyond current conventions. Including evidence from an analysis of four recent practice-based doctorates with data from qualitative interviews with design educators, this paper argues for the relevance of academic literacies for dissertation writing and project work in design. In the final part of the paper I argue for the particular relevance of academic literacies for design research practice.
 
Jeff Nuttall. My Own Mag, issue 1, November 1963, fragments. 
Pickford’s article The Future of Architecture Lies in Ruins , fragments, p. 72 (Pickford 1984: 72). 
Selenitsch’s response to Pickford’s article (Figure 2), fragments (Selenitsch 1984: 75). 
Article
Discourses on epistemology in a variety of disciplines have established the need for diverse and case-specific approaches to writing. This need is as actual in practice-based research, and the relevant fields would benefit from better support of creative experimentation with academic expression. In order to demonstrate that advances in this area are necessary, this article examines advice and criteria for writing offered by a typical writing guide. The discussed examples demonstrate that while the recommendations of such guides are useful, their emphasis on standardization is also limiting. The article contrasts the advice common to writing guides and other prescriptive documents with the current state-of-the-art practice in qualitative research, pointing out productive alternative approaches.
 
Article
This article will describe some of the key tools used throughout a series of collaborative writing workshops. These are part of my ongoing Ph.D. research in the Design Department, entitled, (How) Could co-writing help designers to develop a non-specialist, more comprehensive model of practice (i.e. Metadesign)? Collaborative writing can be a tool to enable incommensurate and heterogeneous writers to work together to develop deep-level team synergy. It can generate unusual and surprising team synergies leading to a shared propensity to dream future scenarios rather than remain within existing contexts. This longitudinal pilot study engaged four Ph.D. students, from different departments at Goldsmiths, University of London, over an extended period of nine months. The outcome of the writing was a set of fictional scenarios about the participants, entitled, Fictional Versions of the Truth about Someone Else. The Ph.D. students, who went on to complete the writing, consisted of one student from each of the following disciplines: Education, Fine Art, Psychology and Media and Communications.The process, which was co-designed and grew organically, began by developing a team synergy through tools developed to build core values, and resulted in the participants benefiting in their confidence and ability to write. They learnt from each other and became both writers of their own fictional stories, as well as editors and critics.
 
Article
The investigation concerns a series of typeface legibility and readability studies which have resulted in the creation of a number of new typefaces including Sylexiad. Sylexiad is grounded and informed from a dyslexic viewpoint and is a typeface for the adult dyslexic reader.Sylexiad was developed by means of comparative typeface testing. This involved a series of formative and summative small-scale tests that accommodated two established word recognition models word shape and parallel letter recognition. This novel method of measuring legibility and readability is called developmental typeface testing. The data was gathered by means of qualitative and quantitative techniques from dyslexic and non-dyslexic groups based at Norwich University College of the Arts and The University of East Anglia. These techniques included questionnaires, interviews and observations. The research was inductive and practice-based in approach.The findings identify which typographic characteristics adult dyslexic and non-dyslexic readers preferred and why. For the majority of non-dyslexic readers tested, it was the combination of serif-style, lowercase forms, large x-heights, medium weight, variable strokes and normal inter-word spacing that was preferred. The non-dyslexic readers also favoured the form of Times New Roman. Conversely, for the majority of dyslexic readers tested it was the combination of handwritten style, uppercase forms, long ascenders and descenders, light weight, uniform strokes, perpendicular design and generous inter-word spacing that was preferred. The dyslexic readers also favoured the form of Serif Sylexiad.The conclusions have raised issues that confirm and contradict current typographic principles of legibility. In particular, from a dyslexic perspective, the word shape model has been challenged. The outcomes and issues that have been identified as a result of developmental typeface testing have therefore contributed to new knowledge within the field of dyslexia typographic research.
 
Article
Developing the recent interest in art-writing, this one-act play explores one aspect of that area: specifically, an artist's writing. The monologue adapts Mieke Bal's notion of art history, written from the place of its objects, to invoke the idea of an artist's writing as writing by and as an artist. Contending that this is writing as aesthetic form, the play's Speaker proposes that an artist's writing is distinct from other forms of discourse about art precisely by virtue of its aesthetic dimension. The speaker defines aesthetic via Hegel's notion of the arts as a symbolic discourse in which the signifier is visible, and motivated by its signified. In a Hegelian scheme, this makes the arts inferior, and hence makes the task of defending aesthetic writing, which takes up the rest of this drama, all the more urgent. The case is made with reference to pedagogic pragmatics, cultural politics, ethics and therapeutics: Barthes' pleasure of the text with which the text concludes.
 
Article
This article outlines a mini piece of empirical study that examines the Journal used in two B.A. (Hons) courses, one Fine Art and the other Design. This qualitative research includes questionnaires and interviews with educators and final year students from one Higher Education College in the United Kingdom. The questions were designed to find out whether the Journal brings about a synthesis between Critical Studies and students' own practice. Responses range from the staff perspective that the Journal confuses the students, through to the view that it has the potential to be of great use and the opinion of most students' that it supports their studio practice. The outcomes suggest further research in relation to the key issues raised: approaches to teaching and learning (specifically writing) and the lead-up to the final-year Critical Studies curriculum content.
 
Article
This research project, now at the end of its third and evaluative year, primarily seeks to support Further Education (FE) and Higher Education (HE) art and design students' critical/reflective awareness and literacy skills through creative writing as relating to multidisciplinary art and design practices, and offers help to develop confidence and greater ownership of learning and participation in dynamic group activities. Through the undertaking of activities, learners explore the relationship between words and pictures and consider the intersections and boundaries where these art forms cross and meet. As a trained teacher, author/illustrator and performance poet who extends his identity into the classroom as part of his pedagogy (Connoisseurship and Criticism. Eisner, 1998), the author encourages learners and peers to also express individual and collective identities through innovative uses of images and words. An extracurricular writing group attended by FE, HE, Postgraduate and Access learners and staff has provided greater opportunity to explore many areas of writing relating to art and design practice to enhance and improve independent learning and communication within the university culture and without it, feeding into the secondary school 1419 agenda, thereby addressing strategic Widening Participation targets. The results: a 50-session teaching pack written and delivered; papers presented at the 2008 University for the Creative Arts (UCA) Teaching and Learning conference, London; Learning and Skills Research Network (LSRN) conference, London 2008; 1419 Agenda Seminar, Kings College University, London; HE Academy Annual conference, Manchester, 2009. Learners, having found greater identity within a community (Communities of Practice, Lave and Wenger, 1998), continue to work with the author in co-facilitation roles to disseminate its findings into the wider educational community, and its challenging impact has led to the embedding of creative thinking and writing into FE, Access and BA (hons) Graphic Communication Courses at UCA, Kent and Surrey. The project has now entered the final phase of evaluation.
 
Article
Kenneth Goldsmith's recent recasting of Sol LeWitt's 1967 article Paragraphs on Conceptual Art as Paragraphs on Conceptual Writing flags a significant tendency in contemporary poetics. For Goldsmith, as for LeWitt, the idea or concept is the most important aspect of the work. Much like the conceptual art of the 1960s, in which all planning and decisions were made beforehand and the execution was a perfunctory affair (LeWitt 1967: 5), a number of contemporary writers have attempted to eliminate the arbitrary, the capricious and the subjective from their texts. While it is true that early conceptualists frequently used language, the turn towards a more overt conceptual poetics in the North American context has occurred in the wake of language writing; this turn means that conceptual writing draws from the insights and practices of both literary and visual art discourse. My critical essay will consider conceptual poetics, with a special focus on the Canadian writer and performer Christian Bk, whose work offers readers a useful site for questioning the interrelationships of performance, concept and writing. Since the early 1990s Bk has produced sound performances, visual texts, artist's bookworks, pataphysical literary theory and formally innovative poetry. My discussion will also address wider questions about the intersection of post-language school poetics and the visual arts. Many of the writers published in L=A=N=G=U=A=G=E and related journals were keenly interested in the complex relationship among reading, reference and subjectivity, a relationship which they saw as having political as well as aesthetic consequences. To what extent does conceptual poetics continue this interest? What is the relationship between sonic performance and page-based writing? And finally, to what extent do the visual aspects of this work dialogue with its conceptual and sonic dimensions?
 
Article
This article presents practice-based research in visual arts undergraduate subjects. Pedagogical approaches in the Visual Arts strand of the Bachelor of New Media Arts (BNMA), School of Creative Arts (SoCA) are outlined as motivational strategies, where stories emerge as the basis for issue-driven projects. Curriculum design was based on the premise that visual artists in a university will access specific software programmes to suit their interests and skills. While students are required to build on skills and knowledge, the lecture programme targets creative art projects with emphasis on conceptual development and digital presentation. Teaching to develop individual pathways in creative arts practitioners at tertiary level has demonstrated benefits and students provided strong appraisal in student feedback for teaching (SFT).Lectures present ways that artists consider a story, along the lines of a plot or storyboard, providing scope for the concept that the character is to expose. Hull and Katz (2006, Crafting an Agentic Self: Cases Studies of Digital Storytelling, 41:1) refer to storytellers becoming their agentic selves in terms of personal development. One subject combines ideas about storytelling with contemporary visual arts and, in the context of relational aesthetics (Bourriaud 2002), connectivity occurs between visual and issue-driven art. The subject design involves broad issues as well as reflexivity, and merges with the scenario of how artists become involved with exposing universal concerns.Students demonstrate potential for research in artworks where visual interpretation of characters involves storytelling and documentation. Artists' statements contextualize the work on display. Students reference web links and identify Computer Learning Technologies (CLT) crucial to their work. They write about software and links to online tutorials to explicate new knowledge and technical advancement.
 
Article
Despite the broad interest in film as an essential aspect of contemporary life, there is no generally accepted and theoretically rigorous method for film analysis suited to a broad range of scholars. The rich tradition of hermeneutics provides such a method. Using Paul Ricoeur's hermeneutical theory to interpret film requires a structure anchored in five key themes. These five themes are (1) explanation and understanding, (2) symbol, (3) metaphor, (4) narrative and (5) imagination. These five themes permit us to understand how a text or film communicates and builds meaning. Each of Ricoeur's five themes offers a specific way to understand the text, in this case, the film. All five themes work together to demonstrate the text or the work as a communicative and artistic whole, a single unit of several interlocked parts. This article will examine the five themes to show how they function together, establishing their role in interpretation. As an example, I apply Ricoeur's hermeneutics to Clint Eastwood's (1992) Western Unforgiven.
 
Article
This article takes the issue of epistemology in writing for (performance) art to ask: What is the value of using fictional as in novelistic writing in reflective discourse on creative practice generally?Using Susan Sontag's seminal essay Against Interpretation as a starting point, the article argues that much writing on art assumes art's will-to-signify its value as a form of meaning and consequently explanation as the purpose of art writing. The problems with this reflex are discussed, including its suppression of alternative responses, which may include acknowledging that art is an affective entity: it has a function (if, in Kant's phrase, it is without purpose) and it has an ontology that may be more than its identity as signification.Extending, or restoring, the scope of art's reflective discourse in this way, the paper also notes, via reference to George Steiner, that a reciprocal extension for the media of this discourse is also possible, and it seeks to map the two extensions as the axes of a grid that offers varied combinations of the content-form dimensions of art writing. One of these conjunctions produces fictional writing as a possible response to art. Seeming to dispel the problem of reductionism in explanatory discourse, the article then goes on to argue that the use of fiction in the spaces of art writing Situational Fiction may be valuable in other ways as well.Hence, this is an argument for knowledge of creative practice in creative form. But Situational Fiction may pursue this ethos of creative knowledge in another way as well: as its reflexive dimension implicates the reader in deciding whether any aspect of this academic paper designates this work as fictional, as the paper understands this.
 
Article
The article addresses topics including creativity as a social ontology, reformulations of the idea of authorship in digital environments, the economics of electronic literature publishing, and the institutional challenges involved in developing academic environments for the teaching of digital writing.
 
Article
It does not take many steps for book to transform from predicate to subject, or for object to change from noun to verb. In this article I discuss the book as concept and as object, drawing on the history of the book, and contemporary discourse and practice, to suggest how books engage us as members of society and as individual practitioners. The article draws on Deleuze and Guattari's reconceptualization of the book as plateau, and as assemblages of strata, working rhizomatically rather than programmatically. It draws too on Foucault's reclamation of the book as experience and experiment rather than knowledge-object to suggest ways of encountering the self and the world in the act of writing. Perhaps not surprisingly, I reject the death of the book scenario, and instead offer an expanded notion of the book as that which can lend itself to performative actualizations, to the magic of the fetish object, and to the work of thought itself: the book as cognitive event; the book as ideas machine. To exemplify these notions, I discuss some recent moves in Australia to explore handmade books that operate not only as art objects, but as research products too, and also suggest how digital books offer alternatives to the conventional performances of identity, for writers and readers.
 
Article
Developing my long-held contention that an artist might write art-theory differently from non-artist theorists, this paper offers an instantiation of one possible approach. First and foremost, it proposes that an artist's art-theory might utilize their understanding of aesthetic form and functioning to conceive of writing as another art-form, now taking place in words and referencing the structures associated with that medium.With a nod to Plato's dialogues, the text adopts the format of a fictional conversation offered as reportage, which takes place between the artist-writer and a philosopher an expert on the subject of truth regimes. The artist consults him in order to progress a project. What ensues puts the artist-writer's preference for a realist approach to writing (representation as reflection) into play with the academic's overview of this and other truth regimes. Introduced to Richard Rorty's pragmatism and hence the idea of truth as use-value, the artist is initially bewildered, only later realizing that it takes her project in a new direction.Given that the text's departure from the form of conventional art-theory is embodied (not just represented), the issues that it raises are implicit, but include: the (dis)advantages of fictional dialogue as theory. (On the one hand both the reader and the writer imaginatively inhabit different points of view more readily than happens with non-fictional prose. On the other hand, fictional dialogue may indulge unreliable spokespersons for particular theoretical positions.) Another point for debate concerns the recourse to the Renaissance pedagogic concept of teaching through delight. (While aesthetic pleasure-in-the-text is a spur for both the writer and the reader, the sensuous dimensions of dramatic embodiment may offer a distraction from more substantial issues.)As much as this text is an instance of a writing-as-an-art-form as theory, it also proposes, reciprocally, that theory may be found outside non-fictional, non-aesthetic academic discourse. When this is the oblique logic of the writing's form, it is also explicitly elaborated in the article, as Drer's woodcut The Draughtsman and the Lute is seen to comprise observations about the conditions of representation that re-appear in the picture that is the fictional discussion in the Caf Flaubert.
 
Article
The beginnings of design histories are inconsistent. While industrial design histories tend to begin with European industrialization in the late eighteenth or early nineteenth centuries, other design disciplines claim a longer genealogy. Art, interior design and graphic design narratives each claim the Paleolithic caves in Southern France and Spain as their mythical birthplace: Altamira, Lascaux and/or Chauvet are used as a conventional starting point in standard textbook histories. A close analysis of the beginnings of several conventional design histories provides a starting point for addressing the cave's place in design history. While historical writing is rarely considered as a poetic practice, in this article, I will examine the poetic construction of the cave as a space for both the projections of contemporary ideas about design and, more importantly, the starting point of a narrative that anxiously binds progressive civilization to specifically European cultural roots.
 
Article
Handwriting has been largely replaced by electronic writing media. As these media converge in digital social networks, writing itself becomes increasingly conversational and informal. What implications does this have for knowledge in general and, more specifically, for educators attempting to encourage and develop new writing practices in creative art and design contexts?
 
Article
One of my intentions in putting together the roundtable discussion From the Page to the Screen to Augmented Reality: New Modes of Language-Driven Technology-Mediated Research at Kingston University in July 2010 was to give the opportunity to research practitioners to perform their projects or present their work, with the aim of stimulating discussion on practice-led research in this field and instigating possibilities for further collaborations. I performed Connected Memories, an interactive generative narrative, which I produced especially after the proposal had been selected to be presented at the panel in Interactive Storytelling and Memory Building in Post-conflict Society for the International Symposium on Electronic Art (ISEA 2009). I invited José Carlos Silvestre to develop the technical side of the work. Silvestre is a New Media artist and writer, interested in ‘how code can signify by means of its native strategies’. It was a very rewarding collaboration, and he needs to be acknowledged for his knowledgeable programming input. The project was performed later in the same year at Landmark, Kunsthall Bergen, Norway as part of the event ‘Network as Space and Medium for collaborative Interdisciplinary Art Practice’ organized by the Linguistic Literary and Aesthetics Studies (LLE) Digital Culture group at the University of Bergen. I chose to present it again at the roundtable discussion to question, through practice as research; notions of meaning production in digital textuality; the double view of linguistic signifiers and visual-language abstract landscapes; the use of technology as a device to collect and share stories; the programming of non-linear interactive narrative structures and storytelling through the performance of the work; and the use of code to perform generative textualities. These themes will be reviewed in this article by presenting the motivations behind the work, concepts, context, research process and technological concerns. My overall research draws from concrete, visual and experimental poetics, art, linguistics and new media art, as does this work.
 
Article
This article is a call for a certain kind of space for a certain kind of conversation. It is a protest against a tendency to over-define in higher education and a current emphasis on knowledge for information's sake. It is also a protest against pressures of time put upon both colleagues and students that prevent spaces for creativity. It advocates listening that is built on trust and built over time. This can apply to the conversation between student and tutor or equally, it can apply to the inner voice that each student can reach. It concerns the hidden that can emerge through a dialogue between the visual and the verbal or between object and maker. The attention paid to what is hidden, on the borders of our consciousness, accessed through reverie, is the key to creativity. The clearing away for such a path necessitates the removal of the clutter of information; it also demands full exploration by students of sources that are not imposed and that have no limit. This understanding has been built by many years of professional practice: as a cultural theory lecturer, trained in dyslexia awareness, and as a psychotherapist.
 
Article
In place of educational bureaucracy, we envision a more joined-up, student-centred, collaborative, ethical, and ecological approach to learning, making and doing. At the institutional and economic level this would entail a closer integration of research, practice, and teaching. In effect, this suggests a unified field that acknowledges writing as a catalyst to a variety of practices such as ideation, visualisation, thought, speech, action, drawing, making or research. A more integrated learning environment will foster new practices of writing, which could become a common ground for staff from many disciplines. Students would also benefit from this process. We wish to develop and share this vision. We believe that, if it is imaginable and shareable it is also viable.
 
Article
I have kept a diary since I was 14. Additionally, about 10 years ago I started a business diary (this was one of my two good business ideas). The handwritten text throughout the book comes out of that. (Stefan Sagmeister, in Sagmeister Made You Look (2001))Of the many research papers generated in the area of design, surprisingly few have paid much attention to design thinking. This article represents an unusual collaboration between an anthropologist and a designer. This proved fruitful in revealing issues that neither researcher had previously encountered. By looking more deeply into the distinctive process of design thinking that Schn (1985) called reflection-in-action they developed the idea of the holding pattern. This refers to the tactical way in which many designers juggle with different types of design thinking in the medium time-scale, whilst holding on to, engaging with, and transferring possible new ideas.In a rapidly changing world, educators need to cultivate design sensibilities that will enable future designers to operate in a more thoughtful and critical way. The article considers the holding pattern and its effect on the nature of design practice, and its implications for design education. We have chosen to explore the work of the designer Stefan Sagmeister as a case study. Our strongly participative approach to research works well when there is a heterogeneous blend of material. In this case, the material we explored included texts, visual material and soundtracks. By looking at the working life of Sagmeister through his career choices, strategies and designs, we were better able to grasp the way the holding pattern works.
 
Article
Robert Smithson is an influential figure in the history of contemporary writing in creative practice. Indebted as his work is to Lewis Carroll, Edgar Allan Poe, Vladimir Nabakov and Antonin Artaud this paper will argue for a distinctly literary examination of Robert Smithson's art. Smithson is best known for his earth-works such as The Spiral Jetty (1972) and Asphalt Rundown (1969) in which he offsets cultural and natural forms of production. Yet Smithson's site-specific practice must be situated in terms of his textual approach. By focusing on aspects of Smithson's writing which call into question mediation, representation, mimesis and documentary, the paper will demonstrate how, throughout Smithson's approach, writing is a means of unsettling the cultural and the textual space of art production. Texts such as A Museum of Language in the Vicinity of Art (1968), The Spiral Jetty (1969) and A Tour of the Monuments of Passaic (1967) are written in correspondence with artworks as a means of relocating the place of production with the reader. The Spiral Jetty essay, for instance, which combines aspects of photography, documentary and film-making stages the Jetty's production by drawing attention to its form as a textual, cultural and factual production. The paper will argue, as indeed Smithson's obsessively essayistic reportage seems to acknowledge, that The Spiral Jetty is a matter of writing. Emblematic of Smithson's work with site-specificity more broadly, the paper will argue that the earthwork exists most fully in the correspondence between writing and fact.
 
Article
The drawing and writing experiment that I offered at the Centre of Learning and Teaching in Art and Design (CLTAD) conference in Berlin, 2010 is related to my Ph.D. research (based at Leeds Metropolitan University). The research centres around what I am calling the lateral or supra-rational sides of designing processes. While the term lateral was originally made popular by de Bono (1967) in his book Lateral Thinking, its association in the research project embraces the kinds of thinking and making connected to ideation, visualization, intuition and other elements of a sphere of practice that are harder to contain and evidence within orthodox Humanities approaches to academic research. Schon (1983) in The Reflective Practitioner, Law on Beyond Method: Mess (2004) and tangentially, in terms of contemplating a network of practice, Lefebvre's Rhythmanalysis (1992) have all further influenced my research. The research project's particular portrait of processes emerged, in a first stage, from interviews with design students, designers/tutors and young designers in Leeds and at the Royal College of Art. The second, more speculative stage of research asks what might happen if such subject matter and such modes of practice are imposed on writing culture. The drawing and writing experiment in Berlin was a hands-on exploration of the theme of Observation.
 
Article
Stemming from a collaborative research project designing, writing, this article outlines preliminary findings to the various ways that design practices and design processes contextualize and explicate an intellectual proposition, i.e. how design contributes to advancing knowledge. The overall aim of the research investigation is to disseminate current understanding and best practice on the relationships between designing and writing and their mutual interest in speculation, expression and research. While most discussions around this topic adopt one of two (often polarized) distinct positions the written text as sole authority and a design object's capacity to be read as a cultural artefact our investigation looks at various media of design articulation directly linked to design as a system of inquiry including but not limited to diaries, diagrams and choreographic notation and comics. These media expose a potential to write through design and expand design research as non-linear, theoretical and yet practical tools.
 
Article
In this article we reflect on reflection. To do this, we share examples of pedagogic approaches used in undergraduate performance programmes at York St John University that re-situate reflective practice within creative practice. For example, we explore the creative, multimodal use of a catalogue document that two of the authors used to encourage students to reflect as part of the B.A. (Hons) Theatre level 2 modules entitled performing the self & artist as witness. These modules aim to encourage students to consider themselves in some sense auteurs of themselves and their art practice. The case study illustrates that we need to go beyond the familiar if we are to be reflexive about the role of reflection in creative practice education.
 
Article
This short text takes the form of a series of modular units focussing on performance readings at PW12, held at the Arnolfini gallery during the winter of 2012. The text consists of parodic aphorisms interspersed with direct quotations taken from the performance. This unusual configuration defamiliarizes the standard research essay format, and brings the readings in question into a more dialogic relation with the critical components of the aphorisms. There is also a tendency here towards the performative inscription of theory. To this end, the article offers a burlesque of critical prose which is sympathetic to the indeterminate poetics of the performances, as well as to the pluralistic character of the event.
 
Article
The following article depicts in speculative and summary form, an advocacy of art writing that is not limited by tight academic conventions. Following brief descriptions of works by Paul Auster (Leviathan, 1992) and Sophie Calle (Double Game, 1999), Hand considers writing for, by and about art as belonging to different competences and appertaining to different conventional approaches to writing as a practice within the broad field of contemporary art.
 
Article
In support of their belief that the truest test of a methodology is to apply it to a new set of questions/practices, Barbara Bridger and J.R. Carpenter embark on a conversation about Carpenter’s computer-­generated dialogue: TRAINS.MISSION [A.DIALOGUE]. As they attempt to find language appropriate to an extended notion of dramaturgy capable of both contributing to and critiquing a digital literary practice, their calls and responses to one another come to perform the form and content of the dialogue in question. The resulting discussion provides an example of putting performance writing methodology into practice.
 
Article
This article is a description of how the digital writers Andy Campbell and Kate Pullinger worked together to create a new piece of online fiction, Duel. Detailing their work processes, from conception through formatting a bespoke scripting process, and on to writing, creating digital assets, and technical experimentation, this article gives a clear and detailed picture of their collaboration.
 
Article
Since 2006 I have been a co-editor of the independent publishing imprint information as material. This article is a position statement about my understanding of what we try to do together through a mode of ‘publishing as praxis’. The first half outlines the intersecting concerns shared by Craig Dworkin, Simon Morris and I, explaining how our collective identity functions as a self-publishing framework for writers who produce ‘conceptualist reading performances’. Following this I explain how certain kinds of self-publishing can be differentiated from vanity publishing by analysing how the two differently relate to the subject-status of the authorial self that they make public. In the second half I speculatively map these ideas onto the emergent field of Conceptual Writing, re-positioning it as an extra-literary approach to writing that performs on the outside of literature’s territory to alter the question of authoriality so central to how we understand literature’s horizons.
 
Article
This article by the launch director of the first degree in Performance Writing, reviews the early 1990s intentions in the light of subsequent changes in the textual environment. The author argues that the original intention to take a broad view of textuality, seen as inseparable from the technologies, cultural practices and domains of conceptual enquiry that sustain it, rather than pursue the narrower, more established, literary and academic notion of ‘creative writing’, still hold good. He reconsiders the two words that make up the name, together with the related notion of performativity, and argues that it remains productive for writing to continue to treat these as problematic and unsettled. Significant developments in digital textuality are acknowledged within an argument that these can usefully remain within a Performance Writing frame of reference. Implications of changes to the ethos and funding of both arts and education are briefly considered.
 
Article
This paper sets out to collaboratively explore the notion of the Performance Writing Network. It documents and reconstitutes a conversation which took place between the authors in late-2012, across Facebook, Twitter and blogging services. The process of re-situating this conversation into a page format for the journal has resulted in a range of unconventional formatting decisions, which reflect on the nature of online writing as a performative and networked activity. The authors retain and draw attention to the stylistic quirks of online (and therefore public, and performative) writing – the incessant ‘paratexts’ of dating and html location, and the simultaneity of thought, composition and redraft. Together, the style and content of the paper give an indication of the thematic and temporal folds which occur in textual conversation (or networking) in online space.
 
Article
During the Performance Writing weekend running parallel to the conference there was a workshop: Performance Writing meets Mapping - A practical investigation of cartography as the signifying practice of both location and identity, led by Melanie Thompson (UK) and Christos Polymenakos (US/GR). This is a discussion between the artists who led the workshop on their process and the outcomes of the workshop.
 
Article
This think piece about past present and emergent means for the exhibition of text works uses embodiment and proximity as its lens. Texts inscribed onto and through and from the body of the humanimal, both in terms of ongoing traditions and immanent capabilities are considered. Body-mind, skin, clothing, paper, architexture and landscape are drawn into play here. I wanted to stir memory and imagination and speculation, to incite ambition and reflection, more than to focus onto a few specific works in detail. In that sense its contribution remains rumination on our contemporary moment in terms of textual production and circulation.
 
Article
What could be a criticality in design? What could be a form of resistance in design? Is design a catalyst between art and capital and therefore always subjected to its role of functioning? Does design need a kind of external experimental space? Questions presented to the Ph.D.-Design list-serve in December 2007 under the title Criticality in Design The Blind Spot by Kaja Gretinger, a design researcher at Jan Van Eyck Akadmie, Masstricht The paper concerns the critical in design which is examined under three headings: structurally, as an internal aspect of the processes of designing; economically, in terms of the internal collusion between (weak) design and the strength, persistence and lure of market forces and private interests; historically, in terms of the emergence of a situationthe artificial becoming the horizon and medium of our existencethat now marks our times as one where design takes on new critical dimensions, above all in relation to securing and creating the conditions that can support a humane sustainable global futures.
 
Article
The Royal Road to the Unconscious (information as material, 2003) was conceived by the artist Simon Morris in order to conduct an experiment on Sigmund Freud's writing. Utilizing Ed Ruscha's book Royal Road Test as a readymade set of instructions, 78 students cut out every single word from Sigmund Freud's Interpretation of Dreams. On Sunday, 1 June 2003, the artist Simon Morris (thrower) threw the words out of the window of a Renault Clio Sport on Redbridge Road, Crossways, Dorset, travelling at a speed of 90mph, approximately 122 miles south-west of Freud's psychoanalytical couch in London. The action freed the words from the structural unity of Freud's text as it subjected them to an 'aleatory moment' - a seemingly random act of utter madness.
 
Article
A short, experimental text produced in the gallery that draws on the Object-Oriented Ontology of Graham Harman – a ‘flat’ ontology, in which there are no subject–object relations, only objects relating to, and withdrawing from, other objects. It is an attempt to write about an artwork from multiple points of view – the space, the work, the audience and the artist.
 
Article
I propose that the conventions of academia may subject the various practices and practitioners of contemporary art to a set of behaviours that privileges certain modes of knowledge and the discovery and presentation of that knowledge over others. This text aims to perform this position through its form, as a means in and of itself to assert the agency of creative practice as a set of processes, and outcomes that are not in any way lacking in rigour, or needing to be brought into line, or licked into shape. The writing you read has been assembled slowly, in pieces, both knowingly and unknowingly, drawing on an array of writing approaches, channeling a spectrum of literary and creative forms, from within and across and around fiction, art writing and other modes of experimental writing. This text is not an academic article, although it was written as a willing acceptance of an invitation to be included in this journal; as with much contemporary art practice, it performs through and in relation to the place that it is encountered within and I expect this to be the case here. This is part two of a two-part article in the form of a letter.
 
Article
This piece is in the form of a graphic list of subconscious writings originally derived from a series of text messages that were deconstructed letter by letter and then reformed by assuming words from the displaced letters. The piece demonstrates how writing under a deliberate rule causes an uncommon textual disposition with an overall blurred meaning. The piece takes the shape of a horizontal line graph that acknowledges the ups and downs of the quotidian.
 
Top-cited authors
Luke Jaaniste
  • Griffith University
Jillian Hamilton
  • Queensland University of Technology
Tom Burns
  • London Metropolitan University
Sandra Sinfield
  • London Metropolitan University
Sandra Abegglen
  • The University of Calgary