Journal of Place Management and Development

Published by Emerald
Online ISSN: 1753-8335
Publications
Article
Purpose – The aim of this paper is to assess the thinning notion in a case study while acknowledging the hybrid nature of regional identities with the past. In The Netherlands, a process can be observed in which regions actively claim their uniqueness to ensure their development and relevance. It seems that regions adopt similar modern labels in their regional marketing, suggesting a so-called thinning of identities away from traditional thick identities. Design/methodology/approach – The paper is based on a content analysis of promotional texts and interviews with politicians to analyse the context, aims and perceptions of the regional marketing. It stresses an approach which sees identities as balanced between the present and the past. Findings – In line with the thinning notion, this case study shows indeed a creation of new thin elements and an exclusion of traditional thick elements in the regional marketing. However, it was also found that the marketing entails creative links between both characteristics, which suggest a tempering of the thinning notion. Practical implications – The results show that linking traditional with utilitarian elements might capacitate traditional regions to allocate the resources for regional marketing more effectively. Originality/value – Despite the fact that studies acknowledge identities as neither thick nor thin, the thinning notion seems to examine both elements as a dichotomy within regions, which does not follow the nature of identities as interconnected in time. Then, the value of this study must be found in the way it goes behind such a dichotomy by presenting an integrative analysis of thin and thick characteristics.
 
Article
Purpose – The purpose of this short article is to outline a research agenda to further our understanding of how retail areas are influenced by, and adapt to, change. This is part of an Economic and Social Research Council-funded project High Street UK 2020. Design/methodology/approach – We outline a research agenda – containing factors which High Street stakeholders in Alsager, Altrincham, Ballymena, Barnsley, Bristol, Congleton, Holmfirth, Market Rasen, Morley and Wrexham have identified as influencing the vitality and viability of their retail areas. Currently, there is little or no academic evidence available to support these factors; therefore, they are worthy of further research. Findings – The towns assert that the following factors influence High Street performance (either positively or negatively) and need further research: business support; engagement and engaged businesses; fragmentation; information; Internet connectivity; local knowledge; measuring economic impact/value; media coverage; networking; public sector dependency and risk aversion. Research limitations/implications – Only 10 towns have taken part in the research. Nevertheless, they are representative of the research-user community for retail centre research. Practical implications – This research agenda will enable researchers to respond to a clear gap in our knowledge about High Street performance, as identified by towns themselves. Social implications – By undertaking the research that people that manage retail areas need, it will enable practitioners to make better informed decisions and manage these important areas more effectively to the benefit of their local communities. Originality/value – By allowing town centre managers, traders, council members/officials and “concerned citizens” to set the agenda for research production in the area of retail centre change, we anticipate forthcoming research in this area will be more highly valued by practitioners and have more impact in “the real world”.
 
Article
Purpose – This paper aims to investigate the structural relationships between the brand equity (BE) dimensions, when the fifth dimension of cultural brand assets is incorporated. The paper seeks to establish and validate a five-dimensional BE measure for cultural urban destination, by comparing findings in two destinations. Design/methodology/approach – The structural model was tested from the perspective of 399 international tourists visiting Athens. Confirmatory factor analysis and structural equation modeling analysis are used to test and validate an integrated BE model for cultural destinations. Findings are compared with respective ones in the case of Rome. Findings – Findings reveal the significance of cultural brand assets for the BE of cultural urban destinations. Further, the study provides useful insight into the theory of reasoned action by investigating the structural relationships developed between BE dimensions and their impact on loyalty. Research limitations/implications – The study argues that the summative valence of associations, as described in the theory of reasoned action, can be applied in the case of a cultural destination as well. Research directions, including additional place brand dimensions, additional destinations, stakeholders groups or multi-group analysis, are advised to verify and generalise the application of the five-dimensional BE model. Practical implications – Findings reveal those cultural brand assets which can help practitioners build up coherent and successful proprietary brand assets. Quality is a necessary pre-requisite to enhance loyalty. In the case of Athens, associations influence only indirect loyalty through their impact on quality. Originality/value – This study offers to the limited literature concerning structural relationships developed among all five BE dimensions and consumer decision-making models in a tourism context. Moreover, the study contributes to the under-researched dimension of cultural brand assets.
 
Article
Purpose – The aim of this paper is to investigate the possible options for matching country destination image with different types of tourism to explain general attributes towards specific forms of tourism, based on previous research on country of origin effects. Design/methodology/approach – A quantitative research design is used for the purpose of the study. Findings – Data analysis demonstrates that the perception of the destination image in a country context varies across various types of tourism in most of the cases investigated. Moreover, the research outcomes portray a close relationship between the match of country image – tourism type and the willingness to visit a destination. Practical implications – The study assists tourism practitioners and policy makers in gaining a better understanding of whether tourists conceive all forms of tourism in a specific country favourably, simply because they link favourable dimensions to that particular country, or whether they perceive only certain types of tourism favourably. Originality/value – This study is among the first to empirically demonstrate the effect of match/mismatch of country destination image with the type of tourism on the willingness to visit, based on specific primary travel motives.
 
Article
Purpose – The paper's objective is to help place management practitioners (particularly downtown managers) evaluate where their work fits in the scope of possible activities which they may undertake, and whether the nature of experience and resources available to them are a good match for those activities. Design/methodology/approach – Observations made based on the author's experience and conversations with professional colleagues are presented in a hierarchy of activity categories using the analogy of spectral optics to identify each. A basic overview of the types of available resources to place managers and their interrelationships supplements the defined activity categories. Findings – Posits that certain place management activities are foundational, implying that experience and cultivating a reputation for success in these prepares a place management organization for, but does not necessarily predict its future success in, other “higher order” activities. Research limitations/implications – While the presented hierarchy of activity categories have a basis in logic, and offer examples of typical activities, the information should be considered an hypothesis untested by supporting research. Practical implications – While not serving as a predictive diagnostic tool, this information is a quick and concise method that place management organizations and practitioners can use to determine their position relative to the activities they undertake and the resources they have (or need) to do so. Originality/value – Both existing and incipient place management organizations will find value in the easily understood and aptly illustrated concepts in the paper.
 
Article
This article has no abstract
 
Article
Purpose ‐ Over decades, mega-events have enjoyed increasing global popularity as catalysts of significant urban renewal both on and beyond the event grounds. Nevertheless, although some mega-events are exemplary in their transformation of some places, post-event failure of others highlight a lack of long-range planning. Yet, such a paradoxical relationship between spectacularity and sustainability has, so far, received little in-depth analysis. Building upon the Yin-Yang theory, the purpose of this paper is to identify the Triple-C gap and argues that planning for mega-event led renewals (MELRs) is an issue of dualism rather than dichotomy. Design/methodology/approach ‐ This paper adopts the multiple-case study approach. Two methodological steps are taken to seek a greater understanding of the issue at global and local scales. One is a review of eight mega-event cases in the West to identify post-event sustainability challenges. The other explores these challenges through an examination of the Expo 2010 development as a chapter of the Huangpu Riverfronts Renewal in Shanghai China. Findings ‐ The eight historical cases and Expo 2010 unanimously challenge the dichotomy between event staging and post-event sustainability. It is therefore high time for future client organizations to rethink how to find a convergence. Practical implications ‐ With lessons drawn, the article concludes that planning an MELR should be pre-post oriented and serve as a catalyst for broader-scale improvements. Originality/value ‐ This pioneering study constitutes a much-needed reference for future mega-event hosts to rethink their commitment to MELDs, which will hopefully spark more interdisciplinary interest.
 
Article
Purpose ‐ The purpose of this paper is to appraise the sustainability of the Nigerian Army Shopping Arena urban renewal project in Oshodi-Lagos, Nigeria. Design/methodology/approach ‐ Case study research design was adopted for the study and both quantitative and qualitative data collection methods were used. Data were collected from randomly selected 94 business operators in the shopping complex using structured questionnaires, while oral interviews were conducted with two purposively selected members of the project management team. Data were also collected through non-participant observation and analysed by using both descriptive statistics and content analysis. Findings ‐ The project was executed using the build-operate-transfer (BOT) arrangement, and users were generally satisfied with facilities provided, except for the provision of utilities. Access to public facilities, creation of job opportunities, community involvement and sense of ownership, as well as the provision of facilities for pedestrian and vehicle users were considered as contributing optimally, while adherence to the principle of green design and construction was rated as contributing minimally to the sustainability of the project. Practical implications ‐ The adoption of BOT can facilitate access to funds for urban renewal projects in the developing countries. Creation of job opportunities, ensuring users' satisfaction, community involvement and compatibility with environment can promote the sustainability of urban renewal projects in the developing countries. Originality/value ‐ The study extents our understanding of funding mechanisms, users' satisfaction with, and the sustainability of urban renewal projects from the Nigerian perspective.
 
Article
Purpose This study aims to explore whether adopting a sustainability narrative in city branding and urban development strategies results in more inclusive governance arrangements (process) and a more pluralistic approach to generating sustainability value (outcome), in line with the triple bottom line approach advocated by the United Nations’ Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). The authors argue that a necessary step to enable meaningful sustainable urban development is to rethink the way in which “value” and “value creation” are being interpreted in urban development policies and city branding narratives. Design/methodology/approach Mixed-methods case study of New York City’s (NYC) urban development and city branding strategies (2007–2019) combining analysis of academic and grey literature on NYC’s urban development and city branding, value hierarchies in NYC urban development strategic plans and local media reports covering NYC’s development and branding processes. Findings Despite claiming commitment to urban sustainability, NYC’s urban development and branding narratives reveal a clear dominance of interpreting “value” primarily as “exchange value”, thus prioritising economic growth. Research limitations/implications In the authors’ view, a systemic, systematic and structured approach to generating “sustainability value” is necessary if city branding is to become a governance tool to support sustainable urban development. A “tetravaluation” approach is recommended as a practical, structured framework that can bridge across the ideas of “sustainability value” and “pluralistic governance”, ensuring effective implementation. Further investigation in additional urban contexts is required. Originality/value The research contributes to current scholarly debates towards more balanced and pluralistic conceptions of “value” and place branding as a more holistic, participatory and democratic governance model for sustainable urban development.
 
Article
Purpose The purpose of this paper is to investigate COVID-19 as a super crisis in the design and management of places. Design/methodology/approach This theory-driven work outlines why and how, by treating COVID-19 as a super crisis, the immunological view rises in priority and swiftly ushers in short- and long-term implications for space design and place management. Findings First, this paper looks at the short-term impact of COVID-19 upon space and place management in addressing how porous bubbling, stippling and flexible curtaining respond to immediate retrofitting needs during the pandemic. Using the concept of COVID-19-induced collective trauma, this paper draws attention to health-care facilities, schools, workplaces, commercial buildings and public outdoor spaces. These sites require short-term improvisation in place and space design and will, where the collective trauma of COVID-19 leaves strong traces, require long-term redesign and rethinking. Social implications As a super crisis, COVID-19 generates contradictions in the existing trend in space and place studies from the notion of space and place as a container to one focusing on “flow.” A focus on flow highlights a focus on space and place as adaptable to changes in flow, especially as augmented and mediated by technology. Originality/value This treatment of COVID-19 as a super crisis is intended to stimulate the design and management of spaces and places in the post-COVID-19 period.
 
Article
Place attachment was also highlighted in the presentation by Dinnie and Warren, which took the ICON model of place branding – the ICON acronym standing for integrated (i.e. involving high levels of stakeholder collaboration), contextualised (i.e. responding to a specific situation of the place), organic (i.e. the place brand evolves as a consequence of a range of both planned and unplanned activities and occurrences) and new (i.e. highlighting the importance of innovation) (Dinnie, 2016). Dinnie and Warren considered the application of this model in the context of the city of Toronto, Canada. In particular, the presentation focused on rap star Drake’s description of his home city as “the 6” in his recent album (referring possibly to the six municipalities that make up metropolitan Toronto or, alternatively, the two telephone area codes for the city, both of which include the number six) and its appropriation by numerous place management/marketing stakeholders. This also included an associated hand gesture, joining the thumb and index finger to form a circle, with the other fingers upright so as to form a figure “6”. This seems to have become an unofficial symbol of this city, used by various city stakeholders across a variety of social media. The existence of such “alternative” place brand symbols and narratives is an interesting area for future research, adding to the existing literature on place branding symbols (Warnaby and Medway, 2010). Cases such as Toronto emphasise on the dynamic nature of place brands and how they can potentially be created.
 
Article
Purpose ‐ The purpose of this paper is to monitor the changes of delivery of city branding advertisements in China and to try to find a tendency of city branding ads in the delivery for the future. Design/methodology/approach ‐ The quantitative research methods used in this paper study the advertisements with city image messages in 13 China Central Television (CCTV) channels that appeared between the year of 2007 to 2010 ‐ a total of 320,653 advertisements. This paper is based on several data sets: advertisement producers, regional distribution of producers, advertisement time slots, types of advertisings, and other such categories. In addition, they have also studied city branding advertisings from international producers in terms of channel selections, program choices, and media outlet choices and so forth. Findings ‐ Through an analysis of quantity and total duration of city image advertisements, it can be concluded that first-tier cities have been reducing the broadcasting of city image ads domestically yearly, and third-tier cities are proving to be a significant power in producing city branding advertisements. Significantly, the eastern littoral region has surpassed the central and west region both in the duration and in growth rate of city branding advertisements. Moreover, between 2007 and 2010, a total of nine foreign cities have produced city branding advertisements on CCTV channels. Unlike cities in China, international cities have scattered their ads widely across different periods of one day. Practical implications ‐ Finally, based on analysis of advantages and disadvantages in city image advertisements strategies applied by those advanced cities at home and abroad, this author hopes this study can offer some scientifically based reference point for other cities. Originality/value ‐ Based on analysis of advantages and disadvantages in city image advertisements strategies applied by those advanced cities at home and abroad, this study tries to offer some scientifically based reference point for other cities.
 
Article
Purpose The purpose of this paper is to address the contemporary interest in participatory destination branding. Because of a lack of empirical and evaluative studies on this form of branding, the current case study examines a volunteer resident ambassador program, which began as part of Aarhus, Denmark’s year as a European City of Culture in 2017, and has become permanent because of its success. Design/methodology/approach The case study is based on official document analyses, participant observations of program activities, and interviews with volunteer program managers and volunteers who greet cruise ship tourists. Findings Findings indicate that while the two managers and the volunteers all report on three volunteer roles – personal hosts, place promoters and providers of information – they prioritize and understand the roles differently. Similarly, the volunteers’ encounters with visitors are all unique, and this inevitably results in the conveyance of unruly and incidental destination images. Practical implications This unruliness is not necessarily problematic: despite the wide-spread interest in the management of participative branding initiatives, it is seen to be the lack of explicit brand-centered management that fosters the program’s positive outcomes, including authentic and pleasant interactions between volunteers and tourists, which, in turn, result in positive attitudes amongst tourists toward their visit. Originality/value This study discovers that positive participatory destination branding outcomes depend on managers respecting the ambassadors’ coveted autonomy, and letting go of control of a destination brand. Because of the growing hostility toward mass tourism in cities internationally, it is also noted that a resident ambassador program’s success is expected to depend on residents’ positive attitudes toward tourists.
 
Article
Purpose Peer-to-peer (P2P) vacation accommodation has recently emerged as a disruptive new form of tourism development. Its potential negative impacts (economic, socio-cultural and environmental) may make residents feel at risk. Therefore, this paper aims to explore residents’ risk perceptions related to the growth of P2P vacation accommodation. Design/methodology/approach The empirical study was conducted in Mallorca (Spain) among 529 residents and a cluster analysis was carried out. Findings Results indicate clearly differentiated sociodemographic and attitudinal profiles, which can be classified into four tourist types. The conclusions of the paper suggest implications for tourist managers. Originality/value In the field of tourism studies, risk perception has been explored from the perspective of both tourists and hosts. To date, however, residents’ perception of risk has received little attention. Given the importance of resident-tourist interaction in fostering successful destinations this paper focusing on this arena.
 
Article
Purpose This study aims to understand how legislation and technology can enhance socio-economic development in low-density population territories, focusing specifically on the dynamics of local tourist accommodation over the past decade. Design/methodology/approach A case study was conducted for five municipalities in one of the most significant tourism regions of Portugal – the Algarve – based on a systematic investigation of relevant laws, regulations and electronic platforms. Official statistics were compiled and analyzed for the five territories’ registered local accommodation services, population, overnight stays and additional local services. Findings The results reveal that public entities’ regulations favor micro-entrepreneurship initiatives in local accommodation and that digital tools supported by online platforms have quite visible effects on low-density territories. The findings also reveal that the local tourist accommodation supply has experienced an especially dynamic, sustained growth over the past decade. This expansion has been accompanied by an increased supply of other services, suggesting that accommodation can positively influence the existing and/or future socio-economic development of low-density territories. Research limitations/implications Further studies focusing on other areas with low-density populations are needed to determine more clearly how local accommodation influences socio-economic development. Practical implications Public regulations supported by digital platforms that favor micro-entrepreneurship initiatives in local accommodation can strengthen local development. Originality/value To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this study is the first to analyze how local tourist accommodation can foster socio-economic development in low-density territories.
 
Article
Purpose A place brand is a public instrument for territorial development that needs a strategic design that is made by the public sector with the support of experts. To ensure that this design has the greatest chances, there should be an alignment between them regarding how the public sector should act when designing the place brand. This study analyzes (a) the alignment and polarization among experts regarding this topic and (b) if experts with different place brand visions show different expectations in the public sector. Design/methodology/approach A web survey was conducted using a sample (n=260) of four types of experts (politicians, scholars, public managers and consultants) in Latin America and Spain. Findings First, there is high agreement that the public sector should have an active role and an open attitude to establish relationships with the private and voluntary sectors. This favors the dialogue among brand creators, and generates a shared vision. Second, there is an elevated alignment with regards to which roles the public sector should play, independently of experts’ place brand visions. Finally, four aspects derived from the four place brand visions are detected that can favor different final approaches regarding the place brand strategic design. Research limitations/implications The study has been performed in Latin America and Spain. Other studies in other areas can complete the previous results. Originality/value The results show how experts perceive the desirables behaviors from the public sector, that is a missing topic in place brand literature.
 
Article
Purpose The purpose of this paper is to present the background to the development of the World Towns’ Framework, developed in June 2016 at the inaugural World Towns Leadership Summit in Scotland. The paper also provides an academic underpinning to the four pillars of the agreement; a unique sense of identity and place, economy, leadership and citizenship and environment. It ends with a call to action for practitioners, policymakers and organisations providing support to people in places who want to contribute to the development of the Framework and adopt it. Design/methodology/approach The paper is divided into four sections. The first section gives the background to the development of the World Towns Framework. The second section publishes the World Towns Framework in its entirety. The third section builds an evidence-base for the components or pillars of the World Towns Framework, based upon work undertaken by the think tanks and academic partners involved in its development. The final section sets out a call for action – explaining how the Framework can be further developed and utilised. Findings The paper contains three main contributions. It articulates a new narrative for towns, neighbourhoods and city districts in responding to contemporary urban challenges; it shapes a new urban agenda for these urban places and it asserts the need for new alliances and approaches essential for a strong competitive economy, which is more inclusive of towns and smaller places, combined with a fairer, more equal society. Research limitations/implications The evidence base for the research is limited to the work that has been carried out by the academic institutions and think tanks that supported the development of the World Towns’ Framework. Practical implications The practical implication of the World Towns Framework are a shared understanding of how towns and smaller places can engage in management, development and marketing practices that will lead to a stronger economy and fairer society. Social implications The focus upon place uniqueness and identity, a more equitable economy, a greener and cleaner environment and stronger place leadership and citizenship can lead to better, fairer and more liveable places. Originality value This is the first attempt to develop a World Towns Framework to shape urban change outside of cities and metropoles.
 
Article
Purpose Societal problems have impacted the northeast of the USA for various generations. This paper aims to analyse various sustainability aspects in the Hudson River watershed of New York by highlighting a temporal progression from environmental sustainability at the watershed level in the 1970s to growing concerns with more localized cross-border social and cultural sustainability in recent decades. We discuss an engagement with the Rapp Road Historic District and a documentary screening series as potential ways to eliminate racism and embrace diversity. Design/methodology/approach The research was based on fieldwork and classroom teaching conducted mostly since summer 2014. It included mixed methods combining document analysis and reviews with the examination of case studies, and the assessment of public policy priorities. Findings Formal training has to be combined with a substantial dose of realism, humility and motivation to recognize that what the authors teach and research in the community matters. Future learning experiences within a place-based education paradigm could include: Having students help devise urban rehabilitation strategies whilst suggesting integrative measures with the surrounding built and natural environments; students could also help improve public spaces in the neighbourhood; and finally, they could also help to strengthen the cultural identity of the district by augmenting urban design features endogenous to the African American community. Practical implications Opportunities could be further augmented with service-learning projects and programmes, internships and even full-time jobs for recent graduates in local community development organizations. Social implications The study served to raise the community’s awareness of its own natural, ecological and human assets, and to create place-based real-world opportunities for students and faculty in environmental and cultural sustainability studies. Originality/value Environmental sustainability is discussed with the creation of the Hudson River Valley National Heritage Area, whilst the public engagement with the Rapp Road Historic Association in the Capital Region of upstate New York, the identification of an emerging creative cluster in the Berkshires-Hudson region, and a documentary and discussion series on striving for diverse cities serve to demonstrate current concerns with social and cultural sustainability.
 
Article
Purpose The purpose of this study is to demonstrate the roles of public spaces in promoting community relations and sense of place in a coastal community, which are both important elements of sustainable community development. This study investigated how activities in public spaces can foster community relations, thereby affecting sense of place, and described how public spaces are used by local residents. Design/methodology/approach The Ban-Chaytalae community in the coastal area of Samutsakorn province, Thailand, was selected as a case study. This community has plentiful wetland resources, which provide various benefits for local people, and several areas in the community are used as public spaces for various activities, such as social interactions, recreation, sports, learning activities and cultural and traditional practices. In-depth interviews with residents in the community were conducted, and a questionnaire was administered in the Ban-Chaytalae community during August-December 2017. Findings The results of content analysis revealed that several places in the community are utilised as public spaces, including shrines, commercial shops, transportation routes, the coast and spaces between homes. Moreover, the results of path analysis revealed that engaging in cultural, traditional, community development and socialising activities had direct effects on residents’ sense of place and indirect effects on sense of place through community relations. Research limitations/implications The study findings implied that land development policy should avoid the deterioration of public places, and furthermore, public spaces should be developed to facilitate activities that can strengthen the active roles of citizens in sustainable community development. Originality/value This study provided empirical evidence on the role of public activities and spaces in promoting community relations and sense of place. The study results imply that the quality and quantity of public spaces where cultural, socialising and community development activities are performed should be conserved. Any development that might change these public spaces has the potential to affect people’s ways of living, which, in turn, influences social relationships and sense of place.
 
Article
Purpose The aim of this study is to outline a practice approach towards safety in public places whereby safety and place is understood as simultaneously produced in everyday work practice. Hence, the focus is shifted from place safety as a manageable asset to safe places as ongoing accomplishments. Design/methodology/approach This study focuses on practices of enacting safe places on the municipal level in Sweden. Thus, the focus of analysis is on the meanings of safety. The empirical material was collected during the period 2017–2019 in the Swedish cities of Stockholm, Helsingborg and Malmö. In different ways, these cities struggle with navigating safety issues in public places. Findings The study demonstrates how urban places are enacted as safe in and through practice. The findings include some of the ways in which safe places are accomplished, such as maintaining and caring for places, countering negative rumours and news reports and forming collaboration across sectors and actors. To gain a better understanding of safety in city centres, the study illuminates competing meaning-making processes in management work practice whereby places are negotiated as safe. Originality/value The existing research on safety in public places is scattered across disciplinary fields and dominated by a fortress approach to safe places. By contrast to the top-down view of safety as a measure of control, this study generates knowledge of how safe places are continuously construed in the junction of management practices and practices of everyday life.
 
Article
Purpose ‐ The purpose of this paper is to link economic value to urban green spaces to enhance the value of green urban spaces, along with the added benefit it can offer to the urban environment. Design/methodology/approach ‐ As part of the VALUE project (Valuing Attractive Landscapes in the Urban Economy, made possible by INTERREG IVB North West Europe, European Regional Development Fund, European Territorial Cooperation, 2007-2013), this development approach was designed to enhance the planning of qualitative urban spaces by linking an economic value to green urban spaces, to enhance value and meaning. Findings ‐ Based on case studies conducted in The Netherlands, the approach proves that by linking an economic value to green urban spaces, space is considered differently, authorities tend to prioritize these spaces and additional spinoffs realize. Research limitations/implications ‐ The notion of green-value is subjective and differs between users, experts and between locations. Practical implications ‐ The paper provides local authorities with a new approach to spatial planning, considering the economic value of green urban spaces. Social implications ‐ The paper transforms the way in which green urban spaces are valued and planned; by realizing the intrinsic value of green urban spaces, in terms of social, environmental and economic benefit. Originality/value ‐ The Value Added Planning approach stresses the need for qualitative planning processes that will enhance future economic value and sustainable development initiatives. The green environment is hard to quantify in terms of economic value, but it is this intrinsic value that can provide future benefit and sustainability in terms of place management and development.
 
Article
Purpose The purpose of this paper is to study ways, which regional administrations affect place branding effectiveness. Design/methodology/approach The study was conducted based on qualitative analysis. In total, 10 place branding cases of federal subjects of Russia were considered to estimate short-, mid- and long-term effects of place brands and quality of regional administrations’ place branding process management. The information on these cases was taken and systematized from three groups of sources, namely, official information from regional administrations (including regulatory acts); scientific publications focused on the brands of selected regions; data from federal and regional news agencies. Findings It is revealed that the quality of place branding processes is positively related to the presence and power of place branding effects, while the branding budget has no observable impact on place branding. The areas of attention for regional administrations intending to develop the place brand are defined. Research limitations/implications The limitation of this study is that the chosen approach is based on secondary data on brand-management practices that are publicly available. This information is mostly fragmentary and may not provide a complete view of place branding practices. Originality/value This paper provides a view on place branding success factors from the standpoint of the quality of branding process, rather than quality of the brand itself. The role of regional administrations in this process is studied, thus proposing a basis for integrating place branding in a public administration field.
 
The conceptual model of the study
Modeling structural equations of the research and fit indicators of the model
Article
Purpose The purpose of this study is on the social aspects of regeneration of historical neighborhoods in Iranian cities. For this purpose, the authors investigated the effect of the social capital of the residents of historical neighborhoods in Tehran on their subjective quality of life and on their willingness to continue living in these historical districts. This study was motivated by the fact that the primary issue in regeneration of Tehran’s historical districts is to stimulate the residents’ desire to continue living in their neighborhoods, thereby preventing the population from decreasing. Design/methodology/approach A review of the theoretical literature revealed that the subjective quality of urban life could act as an intermediary construct that explains the link between social capital and willingness to continue living in a district. With this assumption, the authors administered a questionnaire to 389 residents of different historical neighborhoods who had been randomly selected by cluster sampling. The analysis of the data and the relationships among the constructs was conducted using structural equation modeling. Findings The results suggest that increase in the participants’ social capital, including neighborhood bonds, civic participation, social networks and trust, could increase both their life satisfaction (i.e. subjective quality of urban life) and their willingness to live in the historical district. As indicated by the structural model of this study, the social capital both directly influences willingness to continue living and has an indirect effect on it through the intermediary construct of subjective quality of urban life. Practical implications The findings of this study can help the policymakers of historical districts in Tehran to determine high-priority strategies for regenerating these districts. Some of the most practical policies that can be applied to the context of Tehran include provision of facilities for enhancement of social networks and bonds, formation of non-governmental organizations and using neighborhood bonds to improve the environmental conditions of neighborhood units. Originality/value This study has several advantages. First, the measures used that were taken from the literature have been adjusted to the context of the study with the help of a group of experts. In other words, although the constructs have their roots in theory, their measures are of a local and context-based nature. Second, the obtained results would direct the current approaches to regeneration of historical districts in Iran, which primarily have a physical, economic and elitist basis, towards additional social and participatory approaches.
 
Article
Purpose The elevation of a residential building, or façade, affords aesthetic and functional value to tenants. Façades embody the design of the core product, i.e. the building’s unit. When carefully executed, they contribute to the attractiveness, livability and sustainability of urban areas. The purpose of this study is to show how façades influence consumer decision, and to identify the consumers affected more by façades, i.e., product design. Design/methodology/approach Hinging on notions from product design and appearance, this research underscores the ways by which façades affect potential tenants. It also proposes that personality dimensions (i.e. concern with own physical appearance and view of achievement) identify the tenants affected more by façades. A study involving 1,091 consumers was performed to test the hypotheses. Findings Functional and aesthetic façades facilitated the tenant decision to buy or rent a living unit in three ways: attraction, convection and conversion. Two tenant segments (performers and egotists) were the most affected by façades. Hence, key consumer segments including self-actualizers would be less influenced by product design. Practical implications Construction companies should focus on delivering functional, aesthetic and well-maintained façades to boost satisfaction and sales. They should view the resources allocated to this purpose as an investment. Certain tenants are more affected by façades. Companies should identify the consumer segments more affected by design cues to better respond to their preferences. Policymakers are encouraged to set guidelines that foster well-executed façades in urban areas. Originality/value This research underscored the ways by which the façades of residential buildings shape consumer decision. In addition, it provided a typology to help pinpoint the tenants more affected by façades. Finally, it elaborated design theories in the context of residential building façades, which can be used by future researchers to understand the role of façade in fulfilling tenants’ needs and expectations.
 
Article
Purpose This paper aims to explore the role of migrants in the process of place making, through case studies of migrant engagement with municipal planning in five South African municipalities. Design/methodology/approach This study draws on empirical research carried out over two years, using mixed methods research in each municipal case study. Data come from key stakeholder interviews, participant observation, focus groups and demographic data to understand the perceptions and practices of local government officials and migrants within the community. Findings This research demonstrated that local government officials are assuming a population that is sedentary and geographically bounded, while migration is actively shaping communities. This mobility provides an opportunity for management practices to become more inclusive and effective. Originality/value By examining systems of local governance through the lens of a mobile population, new possibilities emerge about the ways migrant participation can contribute to the definitions of a place.
 
Article
Purpose This paper aims to propose an integrated urban planning framework to achieve sustainable urban development (SUD) in the Malaysian context. Design/methodology/approach In the course of developing this framework, this paper reviews the related literature and Malaysian policies, programs and plans. Findings The findings highlight the importance of developing an integrated urban planning framework with respect to the processes, content and outcomes to achieve SUD in the Malaysian context. Successful SUD planning should be participatory and based on building consensus. Moreover, the content of the plan should include economic growth, social inclusion and development and environmental protection components. Originality/value This study makes a valuable theoretical contribution to the SUD and urban planning literature by proposing an urban planning framework for the promotion of SUD. In addition, this study has a number of practical implications for the Government of Malaysia and local authorities aiming to facilitate SUD.
 
Article
This paper provides evidence on the extent to which traditional agri-food products constitute a leverage to promote tourism in the province of Reggio Calabria, Italy and discusses ways in which community led local development governance institutions might enhance it.
 
Article
Purpose Purpose: The paper aims to bring together Limassol’s rich wine culture with the contemporary facet of its developing infrastructure and superstructure as a means through which to promote this city as a tourist destination. Additionally, to identify how Limassol can be experienced in relation to the wine culture based on the Experience economy model of Pine and Gilmore (1999) Limassol is a seaside city in Cyprus that has developed extensively over the last few years, with a new infrastructure and superstructure that attracts foreign investments. Additionally, the city has a rich wine history with a particular emphasis on ‘Commanadaria wine’ that originates in the 12th century and is directly linked with the Richard the Lionheart king of England and the Third Crusade. Design/methodology/approach Design: Qualitative research, and in particular semi-structured interviews with professionals involved in the tourism industry in Limassol. The particular method was used to understand the ways in which wine history and culture permeate and influence the contemporary way of life in Limassol as a tourist destination. Findings Findings: The main results of this study suggest that Limassol has the potential to become an important destination that fulfils the requirements of the experience economy as put forth by Pine and Gilmore (1999).However, the main hindrance is the lack of a constructive tourism policy exclusive on wine tourism that will give a stronger identity to Limassol. Originality/value Originality: This research is original in nature because it considers a novice geographical area, Limassol in the academic field. Thus it is set as the cornerstone for further investigation on wine and tourism in Limassol. The managerial implications of the study are related to the engagement in wine culture, and in providing a unique identity to the city that can be promoted internationally.
 
Article
Purpose ‐ This paper seeks to highlight hip-hop's contribution to the entrepreneurship and place marketing literature. Hip-hop is taken from the lens of an individual artist, Akon, whose music and lyrics ‐ a "hybrid of silky, West African-styled vocals mixed with North America's East Coast and Southern beats" ‐ provides fresh insights for place marketers. Design/methodology/approach ‐ A "discourse analysis" of the lyrics from two non-chart songs Senegal and Mama Africa provided the conceptual base for a better understanding of the fusion of music and entrepreneurship with place marketing. Findings ‐ Through music, Akon has bridged socio-cultural (ethnic cuisine, immigration and social exclusion, faith or spirituality) and economic attributes (notably remittances) ‐ with implications for entrepreneurship and place marketing. Research limitations/implications ‐ The paper demonstrates that music and entrepreneurship can be extended to place marketing using discourse analysis. Future research may need to consider how to leverage the potential of celebrity endorsement or partnerships in place marketing strategies. It was by no accident that Akon was recruited by PepsiCo for the recently concluded 2010 FIFA World Cup in South Africa through a charity single ‐ Oh Africa! Originality/value ‐ The paper is an attempt to fuse three distinct streams of literature (music, entrepreneurship and place marketing). The value lies in extrapolating a well-known, but little discussed, subject in academia, i.e. the role of hip-hop music in the place marketing discourse.
 
Article
Purpose In the light of contemporary tourist trends, this paper aims to provide insight on the topicality of the Albergo Diffuso Model, more than 30 years since this concept was developed. Design/methodology/approach The paper is not based on any particular methodological approach, as it is a practitioner viewpoint paper. It describes both, the contemporary tourist trends and the Albergo Diffuso Model, its main characteristics and some organizational issues. Findings The Albergo Diffuso is still a model worth implementing as it is relevant for the sustainable development of the Italian territory and of its treasures and to showcase the local traditions and the qualities of the Italian lifestyle. The Italian Government, too, has acknowledged its potential by means of some recent initiatives. Originality/value This paper highlights the value of the Albergo Diffuso Model as a tool to match the peculiar features of the Italian territory, local development and the contemporary tourist trends.
 
Article
Purpose This paper aims to discuss the role of a grassroots initiative in engaging local people in an innovative place-making fringe festival. Festivals such as the Carnival of Flowers are a major tourism event for regional cities like Toowoomba and contribute to place-making through marketing and engagement. Within the professional management of such events, there exists space for innovation and genuine community involvement, which can assist in authentically reflecting place identity. Avant Garden (2007-2008) models a successful grassroots fringe festival, initiated by community members in response to the challenge of long-term drought. Avant Garden engaged locals and tourists in a positive re-imagining of place via site-specific public artworks generated by the community. Design/methodology/approach A survey of 504 visitors to Toowoomba’s public gardens during the first weekend of the 2007 Carnival of Flowers examined how Avant Garden was received by the community. Findings The paper suggests that fringe festivals can provide place-making capacity in broadening festivals as an expression of local identity. Fringe festivals can allow authentic community engagement within a mainstream festival and can indicate longer-term innovations to place branding. Practical implications The paper includes implications for festival managers about effective ways to engage community in grassroots initiatives which reflect innovation, authenticity and greater diversity. Originality/value The paper provides a study of a visual arts fringe festival in the context of place management. The project described allows a “bottom up” approach to engaging the local community which provides authenticity and broadens the scope of an existing mainstream garden festival.
 
Article
Purpose This study aims to explore community involvement in sustainable tourism development (STD) at Siwa Oasis, Egypt, and examines the perspectives of local communities, visitors and governmental decision makers concerning the area’s STD plans. It provides a brief discussion on the stakeholders’ conflict of interest alongside exploring the costs and benefits of STDs for the community. This study examines the area’s problems and challenges and expands the discussion on STD by providing a deep understanding of the oasis context, which involves a broad range of issues. Design/methodology/approach In this exploratory study, 18 semi-structured interviews were conducted with three groups of stakeholders (local community, governmental decision makers and visitors) to investigate the current practices of STD and the future vision for the area. Data were coded and interpreted using thematic analysis. Findings This paper provides empirical insights into how STDs can be practised in an oasis context. It suggests there is a conflict between the governmental vision for the area and the community’s needs that could lead to a failure to implement STDs. Themes related to environmental, social and economic STD dimensions are discussed. The findings provide managerial and practical implications for decision makers on the promotion of STDs in remote communities. Research limitations/implications Because of the chosen research approach, the results may lack generalizability. Therefore, future studies are encouraged to test the study’s propositions further by using a mixed-methods approach, particularly during the COVID-19 pandemic. Practical implications This paper has implications for STD within an oasis context, particularly concerning balancing the economic, environmental, political and social aspects of STD. Originality/value This paper fulfils an identified need to study how STD can be practised when most of the local community is already comparatively well-off economically.
 
Article
Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to report on a special session entitled “Place branding: Are we wasting our time?”, held at the American Marketing Association’s Summer Marketing Educators’ conference in 2014. Design/methodology/approach – The report details the outcome of an Oxford-style debate with two opposing teams of two persons – one team supporting and one team opposing the motion. The opening speaker of each team had 10 minutes to put their case across, and the closing speaker had 8 minutes. Teams took to the stand alternately, matching up against each other’s arguments. Findings – The outcome of the debate points towards a need for place brands to develop as more inclusive and organic entities, in which case it may be best for place practitioners to avoid creating and imposing a place brand and instead help shape it from the views of stakeholder constituencies. This shifts the notion of place branding towards an activity centred on “curation”. Originality/value – The use of a competitive debating format as a means for exploring academic ideas and concepts in the place management field.
 
Article
Purpose The purpose of this paper is to study residents’ ambassadorship and citizenship behaviours and to formulate a conceptual model that incorporates the antecedents of these behaviours. Design/methodology/approach The author collected data from 858 residents of Bangkok, the capital city of Thailand, in January 2016. Structural equation modelling was used to test the hypotheses. Findings This study found that two behaviours – city ambassadorship and city citizenship – result from residents’ positive attitudes about the city. In turn, the perceived quality of the city’s major attributes, including its activities, economy, nature, socialisation and transport, positively affect resident satisfaction and identification. Practical implications City administrators and marketers are encouraged to complement the goal of increasing resident satisfaction with these two behavioural indicators to analyse a city’s resident groups, compare and benchmark them with other cities and track changes periodically. Furthermore, the findings suggest that city administrators must develop their cities in a balanced and holistic way because all attributes of a city significantly affect its residents’ attitudes and behaviours. Originality/value This research extends the academic understanding of residents by investigating “city ambassadorship behaviours” and “city citizenship behaviours” within the city marketing discipline. The two concepts and the conceptual model can be further used to study residents in other contexts. Researchers can also use these two concepts to further develop alternative conceptual frameworks that deepen and broaden the understanding of residents’ positive behaviours.
 
Article
Purpose The purpose of this paper is to define the identity, city identity and architectural identity; to review, analyze and synthesize different pieces from literature to explore and define the factors that shape the city identity; to define the strategies of hybridization process that can be used to re-locate (re-define) the city identity; to examine the most effective factors that shape the identity of Amman city from various perspectives, to examine the relationships/interrelationships between all the factors that shape any city identity from the designers’ perspective, finally, to apply the strategies of hybridization process to re-locate (re-define) Amman’s city identity. Design/methodology/approach This research used two research methods to collect data as follows: literature review, content analysis and face-face questionnaire. Descriptive statistics were used to examine the most effective factors that shape the Amman’s identity from different perspectives. The Pearson product-moment correlation coefficient (Pearson r ) was computed to assess the relationships between all factors that shape the identity of any city from the perspective of Jordanian designers and experts. Findings This research concluded that the factors that shape the city identity are cultural factors (socio-cultural, historical, economical and globalization factors), environmental factors (geographic, climate and building materials factors) and urban and architectural factors (spatial design organization, architectural style, open spaces and parks, urban structure factors). Additionally, the six urban development factors that responsible for the hybridization process in a city are new architectural typology and new special configuration, urban edges and hybrid textures, public hybridization open spaces, roads highway-scapes, urban redevelopment through super sites by star architects and downtown urban developments. This research found that there are different perspectives about the definition and factors that shape the identity of Amman’s city because of differences in cultures, experiences, knowledge, education level and personal preferences. The city identity is not a constant concept. It is changed according to time, place, people, culture, global trends, economic status and experience. Moreover, the correlation results revealed that the relationships/interrelationships between all the factors that shape the identity of any city have strong/very strong positive linear associations and significant relationships ( r > 0.89). Practical implications Greater Amman Municipality (GAM) should provide a vision to redefine the identity of Amman city and control over the development pressure, built form and image of the city. This vision should be based on research, analysis and adoption of the most effective road map. GAM and all stakeholders should establish and enforce using specific architectural styles, urban design guidelines, building codes, policy tools and land use regulations to re-define the city identity. GAM should review, assess, approve and supervise all development projects through all design and construction phases especially in sensitive areas. GAM should focus on building capacity, empower its architects and planners, and re-organize (re-structure) their units and administrations especially planning and licensing departments to improve the city image and guide development. This research recommended that architects should design new, diverse and innovative architectural concepts, typologies and spatial configurations. Rapid development and new edges should be planned, designed and managed from the parts to the whole. The heterogeneous landscape and everyday activities will improve the vitality of urban and open public spaces and form of public culture. Architects and star architects ought not to make a clear and sharp separation between old and new development, architectural styles and typologies. Architects and urban designers ought to design hybrid physical urban environments, urban morphology, urban multi-functional activities, mix-use buildings, open spaces for social life, street patterns and furniture, squares, architectural style and typologies, spatial connectivity, green spaces and landscape entities. The designers and planners should consider how to create a city for living, working and recreation. Originality/value This research defined the identity, city identity, architectural identity and the factors that may shape the city identities. This research proposed and used the hybridization process as a tool to re-locate (re-define) the identity of Amman city and any city to be more obvious. Additionally, this research examined the relationships/interrelationships between the factors that shape the city identity.
 
Article
Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to develop a theoretical framework to explain the development of sustainable culinary places and restaurant clusters. Design/methodology/approach – The theoretical approach is based on a multi-level and multi-perspective case study approach toward studying the organization and governance of clusters of culinary activities and firms. Findings – The main part of findings is based on the comparison of two case studies of the development of restaurant clusters, representing two different forms of knowledge management and governance. Research limitations/implications – The findings underscore the importance of local entrepreneurs, cluster organization and governance, knowledge exchange and learning and dependence on a local catchment area. The findings also show that several forms of cluster organization can coexist in the same area and support each other, adding to increased sustainability and connectedness in an urban area. Practical implications – The findings indicate that there is a need for a more realistic approach to the development of culinary places and destinations, and not solely rely on place branding, standard marketing procedures and support from local authorities. To develop a sustainable and connected place, we need an appropriate form of organization and governance. The findings indicate that different types of restaurant clusters require different forms of governance of knowledge management processes to be effective. Social implications – The paper directs attention to the fact that the food sector constitutes an important sector for employment of immigrants, females and part-time workers, which together constitute the largest group with regard to unemployment in many cities. The paper also shows how the evolution of a culinary culture in Oslo has contributed to solidarity within and between ethnic groups, which is sorely needed today. Originality/value – This paper shows that sustainable, liveable and connected places can be developed without reliance on standard branding and marketing procedures, and despite opposition from the retail industry and lack of support from local authorities.
 
Article
Purpose In last year, the innovations in shipbuilding and logistics have opened the walled towns of Mediterranean port cities to cruise tourism and other culture-led regeneration strategies. Thus, walled towns in Mediterranean port cities have a particular development potential which questions about the opportunities and risks connected to any comprehensive regeneration strategy with a cultural and tourist purpose, especially for fortified systems whose continuity has been undermined. The paper aims to provide some guidelines for policy-makers and planners in port cities which have decided or are deciding to develop a comprehensive strategy and a knowledge framework for the walled town similar to those already adopted for fortified sites in the World Heritage List. Design/methodology/approach The paper investigates on the opportunities and risks connected to any comprehensive regeneration strategy with a cultural and tourist purpose for the walled towns through a comparative analysis of four Mediterranean seaport cities, selected as case studies. Cities which have developed an integrated strategy to inscribe their walled towns to the UNESCO’s World Heritage List. Findings On the base of the case studies’ analysis, the paper proposes a critical reflection upon the management strategies for the UNESCO’s walled towns and supports a better understating of context factors as a way to strengthen the HUL approach when applied to Mediterranean seaport cities. Originality/value The paper sheds light on the application of the historic urban landscape approach to the walled towns of Mediterranean seaport cities. The paper is original because it provides: guidelines for policy-makers and planners in walled towns of Mediterranean seaport cities which have decided or are deciding to develop a comprehensive regeneration strategy for the city centre in line with those adopted in UNESCO’s fortified sites; a critical reflection upon the context factors which can strengthen the HUL approach when applied to Mediterranean seaport cities; criteria to update the HUL approach by UNESCO in analysing the conservation state, the managerial aspects, the participation and social aspects of walled towns.
 
Article
Purpose – This study aims to explore the development of a new city brand in Saudi Arabia. Place Branding theory is geared towards existing places and does not take into account newly developed cities. Here “Place Branding” takes on a new significance. How do we develop a brand for a city that does not yet exist? Who are the actors involved and how do they influence the process? Design/methodology/approach – The study uses discourse analysis to investigate the interplay between actors and place brand development in King Abdullah Economic City (KAEC) for two separate branding scenarios. It is further structured through the theoretical lens of actor-network theory (ANT) to take advantage of relational aspects that can lend insight on how a brand is created and enacted. Findings – Initial findings suggest that branding messages in KAEC are fragmented with little government or other stakeholder involvement leading to poor brand awareness and performance. The study also emphasises the importance of branding practices in the beginning stages of new city development. It further suggests that the message itself, the conceptual place brand, can represent a socially constructed idea or belief that can shape perceptions about the project before physical form is developed. Originality/value – The case study in Saudi Arabia will highlight the opportunities and pitfalls associated with place branding in the Middle East while comparing the findings with traditional place-branding approaches in existing cities. By contextualizing discourse analysis research within an ANT-based exploration of the KAEC brand’s gestation in Saudi Arabia, the study highlights the meaningfulness of a place brand construct in the process of city creation.
 
Article
Purpose Environmental and functional situations of neighbourhoods can play a significant role in maintaining neighbourhoods’ socio-economic activities and residents’ place attachment. This study aims to examine the relationship between architectural identity components (i.e. symbol, ornament and old pattern) and place attachment in Aghazaman neighbourhood as a well-known historic neighbourhood in Sanandaj, Iran. Design/methodology/approach The study is quantitative in nature and a questionnaire survey was conducted on a sample of 300 respondents to assess the relationships between the architectural identity components and place attachment. Findings The findings indicate a significant and positive relationship between architectural identity and place attachment, indicating that higher architectural identity is associated with high perceptions of place attachment amongst residents. The results further indicate that the most influencing factor in shaping architectural identity is old pattern, followed by ornaments and symbols. Social implications As place attachment is a strong incentive to maintain social interactions in neighbourhoods and to create a sense of attachment towards the residential environment, attention must be paid to the relationships amongst people, place, meaning and identity. Originality/value The architectural elements such as motifs and columns give identity to the image of historic neighbourhoods. The use of architectural identity components can help in decision making of planners and practitioners of urban neighbourhoods. The study was designed to develop a guideline so that future developments in Iran could be monitored to sustain strong neighbourhood attachment.
 
Article
Purpose The paper aims to present the case study of Arillas, a small beach resort on Corfu, Greece, where the locals have taken their fate into their own hands in the middle of a crisis. It presents the historical background of the development of tourism in Arillas, the actions that have been undertaken by the local stakeholders to actively participate in the management of the village and to attract alternative, responsible and sustainable forms of tourism to Arillas, and the main players contributing to this process, as well as a look at three important themes contributing to the change. Design/methodology/approach The paper is based on an empirical study spanning many years by a local inhabitant who has an affinity with place management and marketing. It also includes some conclusions of a quantitative, questionnaire-based customer satisfaction survey carried out in 2011 and 2012 among 600 visitors. The analysis of the quantitative data was carried out by the Head of the Corfu Department of the National Tourism Organisation of Greece. Findings The paper demonstrates how a shared vision, combined with empowerment and communication among local stakeholders on improving the place, as well as many joint actions carried out on a volunteer basis have, first of all, dramatically increased the level of engagement of the locals in the present and future of Arillas, and second they have attracted and are attracting more individual travellers who are coming for the hospitality, local food and products, music and cultural festivals, walking, yoga and meditation rather than the outdated mass tourism model. Research limitations/implications It would be very interesting to perform another quantitative, questionnaire-based survey now to compare the results to those of 2012. Originality/value This paper demonstrates that a bottom-up, horizontal approach to placemaking and place marketing can yield substantial results even (or especially) in an adverse economical and social environment.
 
Article
Purpose This paper aims to explore the capacity of Australian silo art from a creative placemaking perspective. The paper also takes up this case as fertile ground for probing into the complexity of creative placemaking. Design/methodology/approach The case study approach is exploratory, drawing on public documents and media sources to thematically (i.e. qualitatively) analyse the factors, actors and processes that pertain to how Australian silo art can contribute towards empowering communities, activating everyday spaces and, ultimately, making socially connected and resilient places. Findings Each theme encapsulates a particular interplay: (1) physical space – social place, (2) past – present – future place, (3) bottom-up – top-down energies, (4) residents – tourists, (5) urban – nonurban place and (6) material – digital place. Research limitations/implications Rather than proffering conclusions about the current impact of silo art on local communities, the paper illuminates the practical workings of silo art as a potential form of creative placemaking. Additionally, thinking of creative placemaking in terms of ongoing interplays could stimulate and expand knowledge and practice in this domain. Originality/value This paper initiates and charts a course for a rigorous and critical investigation into silo art as a substantive cultural and artistic phenomenon and a meaningful chapter in regional arts and creative placemaking in Australia. The interplays distinguished provide an additional basis for probing further into the many layers and overall complexity of creative placemaking.
 
Article
Purpose Community arts practice gives voice to a younger generation, who must be studied as part of the development process from commencement, to accomplish building sustainable destination development in the direction of future prosperity for the rural community. Design/methodology/approach This paper challenges a relatively weak critical practice of the community-based tourism (CBT) by introducing community arts methodologies as a research approach in the context of tourism, the opportunity is created to give voice to a younger generation that must also be included in the development aims of the CBT to achieve sustainable community tourism development. Findings The CBT aims to support access to quality participation in the development process. However, investment in education and building tourism entrepreneurs is not inclusive of the future generations beyond the original generation. Consideration of the desires and imaginations of the future generations must be part of the CBT project for tourism development sustainability. Building awareness of the fragility and value of tourist attractions and resources, in a younger generation that never experienced the original attractions of the traditional village, is critical to achieving the objectives of the CBT. Research limitations/implications The paper is not yet attempting to examine the empirical data of this research. Rather, it challenges current CBT research processes as having a narrow reach into a community. Practical implications Tourism developers and local communities should include an understanding of what directions and what opportunities the next and future generations will have to continue sustainable development. Including children’s imaginations into a community’s tourism development plans will benefit awareness of the present context and assist locals in forecasting the next stage of village development. The present tourism planners would then have a holistic vision for a design strategy sustaining rural livelihoods that acknowledge the limits of nature-based resources and cultural resources. Social implications Community arts research offers the possibility of inclusive participation of community members. Arts methodology attempts to articulate ideas in visual form, for the aim of discussion, reflection and realization of the desires and concerns of the community in terms of lifestyle, environment and cultural heritage, in preparation for the future generation taking control of tourism development. The process aims to impact future decisions effecting the course of tourism development in rural Thailand. Originality/value The paper discusses the potential contribution of community arts practice as a complementary tool by taking into account different aspects of sustainable tourism into CBT concept. The paper evaluates what has been missing in advancing our understanding of sustainable rural tourism development in Thailand. It fills the gaps with a methodological approach that gives voice to the local community. The purpose of this paper is to rethinking the ideology and approach of CBT to be inclusive of all demographics of society for the goal of achieving sustainable tourism and sustainable community development in Thailand context.
 
Article
Purpose Security is one of the most important challenges for contemporary integrated urban developments. In Hungary, every strategic document highlights this goal, seeking social and smart city solutions to the problem. Yet, what about crime prevention through environmental design (CPTED)? The purpose of the paper is to introduce a Central-European perspective into the international discussion of the topic. Design/methodology/approach Focusing on European Union-funded renewal of public space in the historic city centre of Budapest, the research investigates how urban security can be facilitated through urban planning and design. The analysis of two projects based on design documents and interviews with actors highlights the importance of CPTED, although it is not recognised officially either in the development or in the management phase. Findings March 15th Square is an attractive contemporary public space in the tourist-historic city centre. The project was centrally planned, executed with typical EU indicators, but without any special requirements for security. The process resulted in a safescape. By contrast, the main principal for the renewal of Teleki László Square, the first Hungarian example of community-based planning, was to instil a feeling of security. The public square became a fenced defensible space. Practical implications The analysis method can be used for other projects evaluating changes in urban security due to public space renewal: history, requirements for security, design solutions for space division, materials and urban furniture, as well as use of space and management after the regeneration. Originality/value The paper uncovers Hungarian cases where environmental crime prevention criteria are not explicitly but implicitly present in contemporary urban planning and design. In relation to urban security, it highlights the gap that exists among disciplines, indicative of a lack of dialogue among policymakers, researchers, designers and management.
 
Top-cited authors
Sebastian Zenker
  • Copenhagen Business School
Mihalis Kavaratzis
  • Manchester Metropolitan University
Erik Braun
  • Copenhagen Business School
Andrea Lucarelli
  • Stockholm University
Per Olof Berg
  • Stockholm University