Journal of Librarianship and Information Science

Published by SAGE Publications
Online ISSN: 0961-0006
Publications
Article
Reports results of research into the relationship between effective information systems and business performance. The project involved a case study of 12 companies, selected as being 'high performing' according to specified criteria (profitability, productivity, quality, peer evaluation, and export success) and an interview and questionnaire survey technique which investigated: use of information technology to deliver information services, coverage of both internal and external information and data; constitution of the knowledge base; risks to the knowledge base caused by dependency on individuals rather than systems; value of key company staff to the value of information as a contributor to performance; and how far the company can be described as having an information ethos, through which the value of information is conveyed to all workers. Results were used to construct a Research Model of information flows within companies using the variables identified. Findings proved the legitimacy of the research model and validated the interconnected variables studied. Additional variables identified, including environmental factors and internal organizational factors led to the design of an Expanded Research Model.
 
Article
Reports results of 27 case study visits to UK public libraries, Citizens Advice Bureaux (CABx) and other advice agencies to examine existing levels of citizenship information provision within these organizations. The study covered all 13 UK Government Office Regions and one library authority, plus either one CAB or other advice agency, was visited in each region. The visits consisted of interviews with staff and examination of the organizations’ collections of citizenship and community information. Data was gathered on: the extent to which these organizations provide citizenship information and/or advice; staff and training issues; types of citizenship enquiries most frequently received; local demographic factors that affect citizenship information needs; type and arrangement of materials used to answer enquiries; the public’s preferred methods of approaching the organizations; user satisfaction with services; use of information and communication technologies to aid citizenship information provision; links with other citizenship information providers; and future plans to develop services. The findings suggest that public libraries can learn from Citizens Advice Bureaux and vice versa. Concludes that public libraries could develop a more proactive approach to the identification of issues where information is being or will be required by users. Specialized local needs identified included: greater need for HIV/AIDS information; financial problems and debts; seasonal unemployment; and, in Belfast, dealing with the effects of bombing or intimidation. Problems identified included: users from other catchment areas utilizing the service; and users’ requirement for privacy and confidentiality in their approach to the agency, particularly in close-knit communities. British Library Research and Innovation Centre.
 
Article
Discusses the roles that subject librarians (or 'subject specialists') play in contemporary UK academic libraries. Argues that subject librarians, who still form a significant grouping of senior staff in most UK academic libraries, continue to have a significant role to play in the delivery of library services and that applies to both traditional and electronic library services. Discusses the traditional role of subject librarians and analyzes the way in which this role is changing. Those areas where the changing responsibilities are extensions of traditional roles into new areas are pinpointed, together with examples of where subject librarians are performing new roles and adopting new ways of working. Areas where the changing role of subject librarians can be specifically identified include: greater emphasis on liaison with users; advocacy of the collections; adopting new roles; dealing with user enquiries in new ways; working with technical staff; selecting electronic library materials; carrying out more information skills training; having a greater involvement in the implementation of educational technology; team working and project working. Presents practical examples based on experiences at Nottingham university and other UK research libraries. The redesign and relaunch of Nottingham University Library Web site is described to illustrate many of these points.
 
Article
This article was published in the journal, Journal of Librarianship and Information Science and the definitive version is available at; http://lis.sagepub.com/cgi/content/abstract/33/3/112 Reports results of a questionnaire survey of 57 persons with copyright clearance functions in UK Higher Education Libraries and beyond. research project supported by the 2000 Elsevier/LIRG Research Award, entitled “Clearing the Way: copyright clearance in UK Libraries”. Examines the questionnaire responses and case study interviews with regard to the copyright clearance process. Provides an overview of clearance in UK HEIs, namely: who clears rights and where; what materials were being cleared and for what purpose; and what licences and clearing houses were used. It then examines the clearance procedures themselves: receiving requests from internal customers, tracing rights holders, sending requests, rights holder response times and chasing, refusals and unanswered requests, and the terms of permission, including cost. Concludes that copyright clearance is a complex, time-consuming activity for libraries, and that the problems could be addressed on many levels. Accepted for publication
 
Article
Full-text of this article is not available in this e-prints service. This article was originally published [following peer-review] in Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, published by and copyright Sage Publications Ltd. Distils the views obtained from a number of conversations and interviews with staff associated with CALICO (Cape Libraries Co-operative) and GAELIC (Gauteng and Environs Library Consortium) during a study visit in December 1997. Notes the six library co-operatives in South Africa: FRELICO (Free State Library Co-operative); SEALS (South Eastern Academic Library System); CATNIP; EASEL(Eastern Seaboard Libraries); CALICO; and GAELIC. Presents two case studies of CALICO and GAELIC focusing on: missions; structure and management; and activities. Concludes that CALICO and GAELIC and the other library co-operatives and consortia in South Africa have been formed at a time when the challenges facing the new South Africa and, in particular, higher education in South Africa, are considerable. Their objectives and activities reflect the issues facing the management of library resources in higher education in South Africa, including the increasing cost of periodical subscriptions leading library managers to seek collaborative acquisitions strategies and to consider the potential of electronic periodicals and other forms of electronic document delivery.
 
Article
This article outlines a pilot project to offer a personalized online library service to Open University MBA Alumni. A review of the literature and results of a desktop analysis of other UK Higher Education alumni library services is included. Content procurement and systems issues are considered along with the underlying organizational, resource and technical challenges experienced by the librarians involved. An analysis of initial usage and the results of a user survey are presented. Finally, practical advice is provided for other libraries considering similar initiatives.
 
Article
Interest in developing ways to assess information literacy has been growing for several years. Many librarians have developed their own tools to assess aspects of information literacy and have written articles to share their experiences. This article reviews the literature and offers readers a flavour of the methods being used for assessment: those which are popular within the field and also illustrative examples from some of the case studies found, particularly where they show how reliability and validity of the methods, have been considered. It does not aim to be an exhaustive list of case studies or methods, but a representative sample to act as a “jumping off point” for librarians considering introducing assessment of information literacy into their own institutions.
 
Article
Full-text of this article is not available in this e-prints service. This article was originally published [following peer-review] in Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, published by and copyright Sage Publications Ltd. Reviews the state of library and information networking and document delivery in Australia, based on the content of the Australian Library and Information Association 5th Biennial Conference and Exhibition, Adelaide, October 1998. Short case studies are presented which cover the co-operative relationships between libraries, users, organizations and publishers to illustrate the diversity of library and information networking and to show that simple user to user models, or publisher to user models, have only limited utility. Focuses on networks, services and databases and publications unique to Australia. Identifies five different types of Australian library networks: Council of Australian University Librarians (CAUL); public library networks; Colleges of Technical and Advanced Further Education (TAFEs); hospital and medical libraries; and co-operating libraries from different sectors. Considers the role of purchasing consortia, such as: the Public Libraries Automated Information Network (PLAIN); database publishing; the National Periodical Service for Schools; national bibliographic networks (notably Australian Bibliographic Network (ABN)); document delivery services offered by the National Library of Australia; access to electronic periodicals at Flinders University of South Australia; and model licences or licence templates (LIBLICENSE Project, National Electronic Site Licensing Initiative (NESLI), Dutch-German Library Joint licensing Principles and Guidelines and International Coalition of Library Consortia (ICOLC)).
 
Article
Full-text of this article is not available in this e-prints service. This article was originally published [following peer-review] in Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, published by and copyright Sage Publications Ltd. Reviews the market-place for existing current awareness services and uses the main features of these products as standards against which to assess three new current awareness services: Inside Information; SwetScan; and UnCover. Inside Information, from the 1British Library Document Supply Centre, provides a short listing of the key features of each article in the world's principal scholarly periodicals. Approximately one million references are added to the database each year. SwetScan, from Swets Subscription Service covers 7000 periodical titles and provides title, ISSN, year-volume, some article names, authors, page numbers, and, if the library is a Swets subscriber, the library's subscription number. An average of 111073 references are added to the database each month. UnCover is a collaborative venture between Blackwells and CARL and offers access to a multidisciplinary database based on the holdings of the participating libraries. UnCover covers 14 000 periodicals representing the holdings of participating libraries together with additional titles for which Blackwells act as subscription agents. The main focus of UnCover is speed of document delivery and the intention is to provide a fax of a document within 24 hours or less (and within the hour if the document is stored on optical disc). Concludes that, if these three services are successful and lead to wider availability and use of current awareness services in the academic community, this will have a significant impact on libraries and their relationships with end users.
 
Article
A Doctoral Thesis. Submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the award of Doctor of Philosophy of Loughborough University. This thesis reports results of a research study into the usefulness of a user-centred approach for designing information retrieval interfaces. The main objective of the research was to examine the usability of an existing Web-based IR system in order to design a user-centred prototype Web interface. This research used the Web of Science available at http: //wos. mimas. ac. uk. A series of usability experiments was carried out with the Web of Science. The first experiment was carried out using both novice and experienced users to see their performance and satisfaction with the interface. A set of search tasks was obtained from a user survey and was used in the study. The results showed that there were no significant differences in the time taken to complete the tasks, and the number of different search terms used between the two search groups. Novice users were significantly more satisfied with the interface than the experienced group. However, the experienced group was significantly more successful, and made fewer errors than the novice users. The second experiment was conducted on novices' learning and retention with the Web of Science using the same equipment, tasks and environment. The results of the original learning phase of the experiment showed that novices could readily pick up interface functionality when a brief training was provided. However, their retention of search skills weakened over time. Their subjective satisfaction with the interface also diminished from learning to retention. These findings suggested that the fundamental difficulties of searching IR systems still remain with the Web-based version. A heuristic evaluation was carried out to find out the usability problems in the Web of Science interface. Three human factors experts evaluate the interface. The heuristic evaluation was very helpful in identifying some interface design issues for Web IR systems. The most fundamental of these was increasing the match between system and the real world. The results of both the usability testing and the heuristic evaluations served as a baseline for designing a prototype Web interface. The prototype was designed based on a conceptual model of users' information seeking. Various usability evaluation methods were used to test the usability of the prototype system. After each round of testing, the interface was modified in accordance with the test findings. A summative evaluation of the prototype interface showed that both novice and experienced users improved their search performance. Comparative analysis with the earlier usability studies also showed significant improvements in performance and satisfaction with the prototype. These results show that user-centred methods can yield better interface design for IR systems.
 
Use of value-added features
Screenshot from City Sites. Born-digital e-book with two overlay windows called up, and links within text to different sections of text ('The Criteria of Negro Art').
Article
Over recent years there has been considerable confusion over the use of the term ‘e-book’, and this article examines the variety of definitions used to date while proposing a definitive construct. Beginning by examining the definitions of ‘book’, the paper moves on to consider the essential element of a book – the content, and to examine publishing and structural aspects of e-books, as well as their place in libraries, before arriving at a final definition. The definition and its derivation embrace all of the issues that affect the way in which e-books are understood and used today. In conclusion, the article looks at both the genesis of e-books, and the stage of acceptance and adoption that they have reached, with brief reference to 3rd-generation e-book readers available at the time of writing.
 
Article
This article reports on selected results of a comprehensive survey of children's reading in England, carried out online in 2005 by the National Centre for Research in Children's Literature at Roehampton University. With 4182 responses from children living in England aged from 4 to 16 years, the survey is a follow-up to a similar study completed in 1996. The article concentrates on those issues included in the survey which are of particular interest to children's librarians, specifically questions relating to borrowing books, choosing books, reading recommendations, book reviews, school libraries and classroom book corners. (Contains 20 tables and 5 figures.)
 
Article
Reports research into the ways the publishing and bookselling industries are using the World Wide Web, based on samples drawn from the bookselling and publishing categories in the Yahoo! search engine directory and a survey of the sites. Reports results of a questionnaire survey sent to the identified companies in the hope that it would be possible to establish how these industries were using the Web and, by comparing the data with the results from the reexamination of the earlier sites, to be able to see how similar, or dissimilar, the book trades' use of the Web is to other industrial sectors. The study formed part of a continuing investigation into the business use of the World Wide Web. It is concluded that publishers and booksellers are clearly committed to online selling and, since over a third of publishers are selling online, calls into question claims that they are unwilling to alienate bookstores by selling direct to customers. The majority of booksellers are actively engaging in online sellin. Only 15 per cent of Web sites have electronic mail ordering and e-mail ordering appears to be increasingly replaced by online forms.
 
Kolb's learning cycle, taken from McLoughlin (1999) 
Article
Reports results of a study undertaken at the Centre for Information Research (CIRT), University of Central England in Birmingham (UCE) to investigate the applicability of theories and methods of experiential learning and methods to "Branching Out", an ongoing reader development initiative of the Society of Chief Librarians. The project is funded by the Arts Council of England and focuses on both group-based and individual learning methods. Presents a chronology of the relevant theories of experiential learning and considers how theories of group learning and individual learning have been applied to course development at UCE and a practitioner-based initiative. Key theories incorporated into the training programme include: Kolb’s learning cycle; Honey and Mumford’s four learning styles; and Schon’s "reflective practitioner". Concludes that these theories have proved valuable, both in supporting the group-based design of training exercises and in developing reflective techniques through which knowledge acquired can be assimilated and developed. The Branching Out training programme is valuable as a model of professional learning because it provides guidance to both the trainer and the trainee in supporting the application of theory to practice and its methodology combines elements which encourage both group interaction and individual reflection.
 
Article
The paper describes the attempts made in recent years to determine the essential functions of a national library. It considers these functions in relation to the recommendations of the Dainton Committee and the proposals in the White Paper on the British Library. (14 references) (Author/MM)
 
Article
This report focuses on the relationship between information and business performance. Previous work has investigated the relationship between the ‘information culture’ of a company and its business performance. The ‘Åbo Consortium’ - a loose affiliation of researchers in the U.K. and the Nordic countries has met from time to time to discuss the development of a collaborative approach to business information research and this project was intended to serve as a model for parallel investigations to be carried out in other countries. The report also builds upon previous work in the business information sector, including a number of studies carried out at the University of Sheffield - particularly the investigation of information needs in business by White and Wilson, which used a case-study approach as does the study reported here.
 
Article
Full-text of this article is not available in this e-prints service. This article was originally published [following peer-review] in Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, published by and copyright Sage Publications Ltd. Analyses some of the components of graphical user interfaces (GUI), applied to CD-ROM databases (windows, dialogue boxes, menus, commands, buttons, check boxes and icons) and remarks on the degree to which these are based on Windows software. Notes the constraints to GUIs that still remain even after databases have appeared in the marketplace: particularly mouse based prob lems. Discusses ways of evaluating GUIs and their specific components and reports a study of databases in which these types of interfaces are used. Notes the significant variability between products in the way that they apply GUIs and discusses whether database users would benefit from a certain degree of standardization in the basic interface structure using GUIs, or whether users would prefer greater control over the design of the local user interface. Concludes that the introduction of Windows based CD-ROM databases with graphical user interfaces will increasingly revolutionize the design of such data bases. Makes 3 recommendations that would aim to enhance the user friend liness of CD-ROM interfaces: research to develop criteria for evaluating interfaces in the GUI environment; standardization of interface design between some products, particularly for novice users; and facilities to allow experienced users to develop and tailor their own interface design.
 
Article
This article is Restricted Access. It was published in the journal, Journal of librarianship and information science [© SAGE] and is available at: http://lis.sagepub.com/ This article reports an investigation of the attitudes and opinions of children’s librarians towards poetry, and towards its promotion in the public library. It also reports some attitudes towards literature promotion to young people in general. A series of structured interviews with library professionals currently working in the public sector strongly indicate that children’s librarians are themselves enthusiastic concerning poetry, and are firmly convinced both of the benefits incurred by children encouraged to read, write and listen to poems from a very early age, and of children’s own enjoyment of this genre. Due to its brevity and memorability, poetry is regarded by the interviewees as the most accessible literary form for poor or reluctant readers, despite its wider image as a neglected and ‘difficult’ genre for children and young people.
 
Article
An examination of the problems encountered by the British National Bibliography in applying a "standard" Decimal Classification notation to new books in parallel with the practice of the Decimal Classification Division of the Library of Congress; and of the implica tions for standardization of practice generally in this field. This article is an edited version of the paper given by the author at the Cataloguing &. Indexing Group Seminar "Subject to Information", Aberystwyth, April 1970.
 
Article
The final, definitive version of this article has been published in the Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, 39(1), 2007 [© SAGE Publications Ltd] by SAGE Publications Ltd at: http://lis.sagepub.com on SAGE Journals Online: http://online.sagepub.com/ This paper describes an exploratory, qualitative, study of the motivational issues associated with project work – a method intended to help encourage independent learning skills. The population studied were United Kingdom secondary school students who attended a state funded comprehensive school in Derbyshire. The study chose to explore why students, generally, did not engage in the project process and to determine those factors that either motivated or de-motivated them during this process. Questionnaires were completed by twenty-six Year 7 (11-12 year old) students and ten Year 13 (17-18 year old) students. Interviews were conducted with six Year 7s and ten Year 13 students. In addition six Year 7 students were involved in a focus group and nine Year 13 students in a separate focus group. Different methods, as well as previous research, enabled triangulation of the data and indicated the validity of the findings. Aspects of the students experience when undertaking a piece of research were found to be de-motivating. In general students did not have a clear understanding of the different elements of information literacy. The majority considered that their information skills were not well developed and they were not confident of completing the research process successfully. Specific factors that had significant impact on the students’ motivation included choice of topic, the amount of group work, the level of support and feedback during the process and the study environment. It was also found, in this case study, that educators did not utilise Library and Information Science (LIS) information literacy/information behaviour models or knowledge to teach and support project work. Nor was there any recognition of the attitudes and skills or motivational issues associated with the stages of the project process. This was in contrast to the teaching in school of data analysis and handling, using Information and Communication Technology (ICT), during subject based project work where there seems to be a more cohesive approach. Based on these findings recommendations for improving the project process and the learning experience are given.
 
Article
Article prompted by an editorial published in Education for Information, 14, (2) July 1996, 83-4. Outlines some of the responses being made by library schools to changes affecting the library and information science (LIS) profession, including: changes in the place of information in society; availability and sophistication of information technology; changing nature of the information and communication industry; and the added complexities that these have brought to the task of maintaining and developing information services. Focuses on UK library schools’ activities aimed at: updating their curricula and courses to develop the necessary technical competencies; planning for the growing needs of management and leadership skills; determining how best LIS practitioners can assist.
 
Article
This article presents two recent studies, an AHRC-funded exploration of the role of empathy in community librarianship (Study 1) and an investigation of the role of empathy in service to minority ethnic users (Study 2). Qualitative elements of each methodology are presented, namely a series of focus groups with frontline staff, interviews with senior managers and a research workshop (Study 1), and a case study investigation of a public library in the heart of a Chinese community (Study 2). Synthesizing the data of both studies, an analysis is conducted of the relationship between the cultural identities of library staff and their ability to empathize with the public. It is concluded that empathy plays a role in facilitating effective communication between staff and users, but that a distinction should be made between intuitive and cognitive empathy, in considering the potential of staff training to develop appropriate levels of emotional response to members of all communities.
 
Article
Copyright: 2009 SAGE Publications. This is the author's version of the work. It is posted here by permission of SAGE Publications for your personal use. Not for redistribution. The definitive version was published in the Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Vol.41(2), pp 108-123 The mere fact that a library service is being used does not mean that the service makes a difference or has a positive impact on the user. This has significant implications for Special Library and Information Services (SL&IS) that have to constantly prove that they add value. Because of the difficulty of measuring impact effectively, the majority of libraries still appear to measure performance quantitatively (how many books do we have, how many are used etc.) instead of looking at the difference the service actually makes. This paper discusses specifically the impact an information service has on the ability of natural science researchers to perform their research effectively and efficiently. A focus group, short survey and 15 interviews were conducted with researchers that use SL&IS in their research at the South African Council for Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR) - the largest research Council in Africa. The results showed that researchers felt that Library and Information Services have a positive impact on the research process. The two most important indicators of impact chosen by the researchers were firstly, time saved in information retrieval and delivery and secondly, higher success rate in research. In contrast with Poll's (2005) view, researchers felt that Library and Information Services do not necessarily impact on growing their skills and competencies or their attitude and behaviour as researchers. The relationship between the librarian and the researcher also came to light as very important in the research process. The study also identified further important indicators of impact which will serve as the foundation for a more in-depth research study.
 
Article
Follow-up surveys of Masters programme graduates at the Department of Information Studies have been conducted at regular intervals since 1973. The findings of these reviews are outlined here, with particular reference to graduates' perceptions of the relevance and value of the programmes they followed to their subsequent professional employment, and to factors affecting their job satisfaction in first and subsequent posts. Overall, graduates surveyed commented favourably on the quality and relevance of the programmes while making positive suggestions as to how the programmes might be improved. Factors affecting job satisfaction varied, depending on job destinations and employment sector, as did the commonest causes of job dissatisfaction.
 
Article
This study investigates the efficiency of the Google search engine at retrieving items from 26 UK Institutional Repositories, covering a wide range of subject areas. One item is chosen from each repository and four searches are carried out: two keyword searches and two full title searches, each using both Google and then Google Scholar. A further search tests the retrieval of the item from the repository interface. Known information-seeking behaviour was taken into account when interpreting the results. These show that the Google and Google Scholar user would retrieve items from the repositories, particularly when the full title was known. However, some skill would be needed to evaluate the different versions of texts retrieved, and accessing the repositories through more sophisticated harvesting services might prove a better option for the scholar.
 
Article
This article is Restricted Access. It was published in the journal, Journal of Librarianship and Information Science [© Chartered Institute of Library and Information Professionals] and is available online at http://lis.sagepub.com/ ICT has enabled a wide dissemination of information and a sharp increase in the magnitude of electronic information sources. The use of e-information sources by healthcare personnel within Saudi Arabia has received little research attention. This paper discusses the use of e-information sources by healthcare personnel in the kingdom. A questionnaire with open-ended questions was designed to collect data from eleven governmental hospitals and health centres in Riyadh. It identified a range of problems and obstacles that impact on the use of electronic information sources. The identification of these difficulties opens the way for development and improvement of the current situation. This study was completed with the sponsorship of King Saud University.
 
Article
Full-text of this article is not available in this e-prints service. This article was originally published following peer-review in the Journal of librarianship and information science, published by and copyright Sage Publications Ltd. Introduces the background to the EQLIPSE (Evaluation and Quality in Library Performance: System for Europe) project and the work done in compiling a core set of performance indicators for evaluating libraries. Describes the collection of in house library use data at the University of Central Lancashire Library test site, where EQLIPSE staff gathered data as part of the data collection exercise to test the feasibility of the indicators and to accumulate data in the EQLIPSE system. Some of the difficulties encountered in the process are noted along with the measures taken to address them. In addition to measuring actual use, attempts were also made to establish whether users habitually reshelve items they consult, both when at the shelf and when working at study spaces. Unobtrusive direct observation eventually formed the mainstay of the methods used to measure this. Results suggest that users consulting items at the shelf would change every 10 minutes on average and that the number of users would fall or rise gradually during the two hours between counts. Future developments to the EQLIPSE methodology are discussed.
 
Article
The role of the public library in encouraging reading and using ICT in the reading development process has been included in a number of Government reports during the 1990s and 2000s in the UK. Following the successful implementation of the People’s Network many public libraries are developing ways of using ICT in reader development. In Wales, as part of an initiative called Estyn Allan (Branching Out) all 22 public library authorities have staff responsible for reader-development issues covering, in many cases, both the Welsh and English language. This paper reports on the results of a questionnaire, sent to all reader-development librarians in Wales, and provides examples of some of the work being undertaken.
 
Article
Although a number of studies have investigated the attitudes of published academic authors with respect to open access (OA) publishing and institutional repositories (IRs), none have considered the views of other institutional stakeholders. Research students, in particular, are a group that could make a major contribution to an IR, both currently and in their future careers. But how acceptable is their work to those responsible for IRs? The project described here investigates the views of repository managers. A short email survey was carried out, comprising questions about student use of the repository, advocacy undertaken and attitudes toward research student content. Responses were received from representatives of 35 universities in the UK and abroad. Repository managers were overwhelmingly in favour of permitting the deposit of research student work, albeit under specified conditions. One half of the respondents mentioned allowing, or even encouraging, the deposit of theses and dissertations. The relative newness of many repositories meant that advocacy to student authors was limited, although a number of managers were including the repository as an information source in routine research training sessions. The paper concludes that there is a need for clear guidance on the quality of repository content; that evidence of use should be sought; and that IR policy should accommodate the needs of all stakeholders.
 
Article
This article has been accepted for publication in the journal, Journal of Librarianship and Information Science [© Sage]. The definitive version is available at: http://lis.sagepub.com/. This paper investigates the potential role for research students in an institutional repository (IR). Face-to-face interviews with 34 research students at Loughborough University were carried out. Using a mixture of closed and open questions, the interviews explored the students’ experiences and opinions of publishing, open access and the proposed Loughborough repository. As both authors and readers, students were most interested in access to complete theses, postprints and conference papers. The ability to disseminate their work and receive feedback and commentary were the most important motivators to students depositing work in the IR, closely followed by the principle of open access. The greatest deterrents were the risk of being unable to publish elsewhere later, the ownership of copyright, and plagiarism. Appropriate recommendations are made for the implementation of an institutional repository.
 
Article
This article reports on an empirical study on novices’ learning and retention with the Web-based interface to the Web of Science. The aim was to evaluate the performance of novice searchers in initially learning to use the search interface and in later use. Their performance in both sessions was measured in terms of time taken to perform tasks, search terms used, success of the tasks performed and error rates. At the end of each session, novices’ subjective satisfaction with the interface was also measured. The results showed that novices’ performance was better in the learning session. Their performance in the retention session declined significantly in terms of success score as they forgot the interface functionalities from one search session to another. Novices’ subjective satisfaction with the interface was also higher in their learning session. Their satisfaction rating with the interface declined sharply in the retention session. The Web of Science interface suffers from usability problems which made its functionalities difficult to learn and remember for naïve searchers.
 
Article
The Investigation into Information Requirements of the Social Sciences (INFROSS) was initiated in 1968 because it was feared that in the absence of knowledge about information requirements of the social sciences, solutions adopted in science, based on the findings of science user studies, would be applied to the social sciences. It is now desirable that the results of INFROSS should be compared with those of science user studies. To do this it is essential that studies should be based on comparable data. The relationship between the sciences and the characteristics of each science must be taken into account in ascertaining the differing information requirements of scientists and social scientists. This report therefore attempts to draw from science user studies possible general conclusions that enable a comparison to be made with the results of INFROSS, and in doing so considers some of the methodological problems involved. (Related reports are LI004402 and 004403.) (Author/SJ)
 
Article
Presented are a description of the history of the presidential papers in the United States, the development and functions of the presidential library system, and a brief look at future developments. (39 references) (Author)
 
Article
Full-text of this article is not available in this e-prints service. This article was originally published [following peer-review] in Journal of librarianship and information science, published by and copyright Sage. It is evident from previous research that user satisfaction is a multidimensional, subjective variable which can be affected by many factors other than performance of the system or searcher. This article draws on information retrieval and information systems literature in an attempt to understand what user satisfaction is, how it is measured, what factors affect it, and why findings on user satisfaction have been so varied and contradictory. It concludes with recommendations for future investigation of the use of user satisfaction as a measure of system performance.
 
Article
Following a career in public and college libraries Dr Norman Roberts taught at Birmingham, Aberystwyth, and Sheffield University Library Schools from 1959 to 1982. From 1983 to 1988 he was the Director of the Consultancy and Research Unit (CRUS) at Sheffield University, there continuing earlier policies of exploring business information issues. He has undertaken a number of educational commissions overseas.
 
Article
In order for libraries to survive as necessary institutions in the era of the fourth Industrial Revolution, new strategies and directions must be sought by closely analyzing key trends and challenges. This study attempted to organize Library models 1.0 through 5.0 by comprehensively analyzing the core trends surrounding the library, that is, the advent of the fourth Industrial Revolution era; the promotion of the Korean version of the New Deal policy; and Gartner’s global IT trend. To this end, major references discussing Web 5.0 and Library 5.0 in Web 1.0 and Library 1.0 and all related documents (e.g. Google Scholar, EbscoHost, LISA, etc.) were analyzed. Key and representative keywords forming the Library 5.0 model were derived, and based on this, the substance of each version of the library model was presented.
 
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