Journal of Conchology

Publications
The relationship between the prevalence and abundance (infection intensity) of trematode parasites infecting Lymnaea stagnalis L. was investigated based on collections of snails from 12 sites in central UK. Five species of trematode were recorded from the snails. There was a significant positive relationship between the prevalence and abundance (intensity of infection) of trematode species.
 
Duration of copulation time in Arion vulgaris from 2 different mating experiments from Poland (Kozłowski & Sionek, 2001) and Norway (this study). I-Iv refers to different mating phases – see text for more details.  
Mating between Arion rufus x ater hybrid (orange colour) and A. vulgaris (Experiment I – see Table 1): A) Initial phase where slugs follow each other and B) copulation with circling.  
Arion vulgaris Moquin-Tandon 1855 (synonym Arion lusitanicus Mabille 1868) lias been spreading through Norway during the last 20 years. We present phenological and reproductive data from iuestern Norzvegian populations. Mating experiments under semi-natural conditions revealed a prolonged duration of copulation compared with other studies. In partner choice experiments using marked slugs we observed that remating occurred in this Arion species. For the first time, experimental evidence for mating between Arion rufus x ater (Linnaeus 1758) and A. vulgaris is reported which confirms other genetic and morphological studies suggesting low reproductive isolation within the larger Arion species complex. Moreover, even based on very preliminary experiments our data suggest a case for possible mitochondrial heteroplasmy in Arion.
 
A population of the viviparous freshwater bivalve Sphaerium corneum L. from an artificial mill race subjected to irregular changes of water level was investigated using quantitative monthly sampling, paraffin histological sections and chromosome preparations. Unlike most of the previously studied populations of the genera Sphaerium and Musculium, that presented in this paper exhibits less synchronised life-spans. Despite two main birth periods, many specimens also release their broods individually during the season. An adult usually breeds at least twice in a season. The life span is more than one, usually one and a half years. All age and length classes are able to overwinter. Spermatogenesis and oogenesis apparently proceeds simultaneously from spring to autumn and they occur also in fully developed larvae which are still retained inside their parents' gills. Relationships between the observed breeding strategy and fluctuations of the environment are discussed, as well as the intraspecific and interspecific variation in life-history traits within the Sphaeriidae.
 
Europe's increasing populations of medium-size predators pose a potential threat to freshwater mussels in some regions. Live mussels (Anodonta cygnea) collected from the bottom of Zalew Pinczowski reservoir (S Poland) did not differ in size from shells of individuals predated by otters, but the shells of predated individuals varied in size significantly less, suggesting that only the middle size class is predated. A similar size class was predated in a sample of live mussels equipped with radio transmitters and experimentally distributed near an otter den: 10% were eliminated within a month, indicating substantial predation pressure. Older mussels were not attacked or else the attacks were unsuccessful, suggesting that the otter cannot seriously threaten the reproductive-age part of the population, but predation on middle-size individuals might lead to ageing and eventual extinction of populations, especially small and isolated ones.
 
Variation in several shell features of five populations of Clausilia bidentata (Strom 1765) in north-east Yorkshire (VC 62), England, was recorded over a three year period. Mean shell height was found to differ significantly and consistently over the three years between population samples. Moreover, mean shell height rose in all five populations between the first and second year and then fell slightly in the third year, a pattern that may result from variation in weather conditions at a regional level. Shell height was found to vary proportionately more than shell breadth, thus taller shells were on average proportionately narrower and not simply bigger versions of the same conispiral. Greater shell height appears to be a result of both the development of additional whorls and increased pitch during growth. Overall, 4.79% (24/502) of shells had the parietal area of the lip attached to the adjacent whorl. The frequency of this minor variant showed neither any association with other factors investigated nor any consistent pattern in occurrence. The number of extralamellar denticles varied from none to (rarely) three and fluctuated between population samples and between years for each population with no evident pattern.
 
Aegopinella nitidula and Nesovitrea hammonis are land snails whose broad-scale distributions are similar but which often occur in different habitats. We investigated possible relationships between environmental factors -biotope type (woodland, river-bank or meadow) and 20 edaphic factors - and the distributions of these two speces in northwest Spain. Frequency of occurrence of Aegopinella nitidula was significantly higher than expected in sites with low to intermediate soil Mg content, low soil pH and intermediate soil Al content. Frequency of occurrence of Nesovitrea hammonis was significantly higher than expected in meadow sites and in sites with high soil moisture content, high soil porosity, a low soil C:N ratio of 0-10, and high soil N content.
 
Shell of the neotype of Helix cincta: Italy, Arquà Terme, crossroad of Via Costa and Via degli Ulivi (municipality of Arquà Petrarca, province of Padua), 32TQR1316, I. Niero leg. 10.06.2010. 
variability in the neotype (ARQ1) and other specimens from the type locality of Helix cincta (ARQ2-ARQ6). Nine anatomical variables were counted (LDG and RDG) or measured using a caliper (all the others; in mm): P length of penis, E length of epiphallus, F length of flagellum, BCD length of bursa copulatrix duct, DBCD length of distal part of bursa copulatrix duct, PBCD length of proximal part of bursa copulatrix duct, DBC length of diverticulum of bursa copulatrix duct, LDG number of branches of left digiti- form glands group, RDG number of branches of right digitiform glands group. E and P are conceived according to Hesse (1908). 
As currently conceived, Helix cincta Muller, 1774, is widespread in the north-east Mediterranean from Italy to the Middle East. Recent phylogenetic research shows that it is not monophyletic and raises the question of which of its clades includes the true species of Muller. Unfortunately the type material no longer exists, the original description is defective and no precise type locality is available. To definitively clarify its identity, a neotype is designated according to Rossmassler's interpretation that it was mainly an Italian species.
 
Map of Peninsular Malaysia and magnification of its inset section of Kapas Island (5° 13' 045" N; 103° 15' 706" E). The dark circles indicate the collecting sites of A. (A.) inversus albulus new subspecies. 
Shell characteristics of A. (A.) inversus albulus new subspecies. A Holotype (CUMZ 2323). B Paratype (CUMZ 2324). C Comparison of shell and soft-body colour of the nominotypical subspecies (left) from Singapore (CUMZ 2320) and a paratype of A. (A.) inversus albulus a new subspecies (right) from Kapas Island (CUMZ 2300). 
Reproductive system of A. (A.) inversus albulus new subspecies (CUMZ 2324; 7 th March, 2004). A The general view of genital system. B Interior structure of penis, atrium and vaginal chamber. C The connection of the hermaphroditic duct to the talon. 
SEM images of radula of A. (A.) inversus albulus new subspecies (CUMZ 2324). A Central teeth with the first to the forth lateral teeth. B Lateral teeth with the tricuspid marginal teeth transition. C Marginal teeth. D Outermost marginal teeth. Central tooth is indicated by 'C' and the other numbers indicate the order of lateral and marginal teeth. 
Amphidromus (Amphidromus) inversus (Müller, 1774) was recently re-described and considered to consist of only three subspecies: the nominotypical subspecies, A. (A.) inversus annamiticus (Crosse & Fischer, 1863) and A. (A.) inverses andamanensis (Pfeiffer, 1871). Here we describe a new subspecies that was discovered during a recent malacological survey in eastern peninsular Malaysia. The prominent characteristics of the new subspecies are the chirally dimorphic, whitish shell, absence of brownish radial streaks and sub-peripheral band, and the long epiphallus with variable coiling.
 
The original description of the opisthobranch gastropod Akera bullata mentions a tail-like trailing "palliai filament". Several other early descriptions illustrate this structure, as do a recent field guide and other authoritative works. However, this filament is absent from (at least some) British and Irish populations. In a population in west Scotland there is no such structure, but many individuals have "tails" of two kinds - trails of mucus containing pseudofaeces, or filamentous algae growing on the shell. Using the latter as an example, I tentatively propose that the "palliai filament" of early authors was not a genuine body part but another organism, possibly a hydroid coelenterate, growing on the shell. This needs verification by examination of Akera with a filament like that described by early authors. However, there seem to have been no first-liand descriptions of animals with this structure since Tchang-Si (1931).
 
The historical and recent distribution of Margaritifera auricularia is evaluated based on museum specimens. A total of 210 specimens belonging to 129 lots were studied. All recent populations of M. auricularia are recorded from rivers flowing to the Atlantic, Mediterranean and Adriatic. No big differences were found between the inferred distribution and the two maps published previously. Only two specimens from the River Rhine have been found, one collected in the XVIII century and the other fossil. Supposed recent specimens from this river were wrongly labelled.
 
Unio crassus, an endangered freshwater mussel species, inhabits streams with diversified physical structure, subject to frequent changes in channel morphology. It is usually regarded as a sedentary animal, although individual movement has been observed. The hypothesis that adults can use movement in order to actively select a microhabitat was tested in two experiments simulating dislodgement of mussels by a stream. In the first experiment, begun in 2004, individually tagged Unio crassus individuals were distributed in a regular pattern through ut a 17 m long riffle-pool reach of Cedron River (S Poland). The mussels changed their positions after displacement. The distances travelled differed significantly between parts of the channel: they covered longer distances in the pool (ca 2 in) than in the riffle (ca 0.6 in), with minimal movements on steep banks and dead water areas and large movements in shallows and deep areas. Individuals from shallow places were found to have moved to the steep bank of the pool, built of fine sediments, and to the area of dead water in the lee of boulders. The movements were not related to the water depth gradient: individuals moved to the steep bank even from the deepest parts of the pool, a finding experimentally confirmed with radio-tracked individuals. The second experiment was begun in 2008 in a smaller reach 5 in long. The mussels were put in the deepest part of the reach. Most of them climbed to a steep bank built of fine sediment with minimal flow, and some of them hid beneath the gray 1 armouring the fast-flowing part of the channel. It can be concluded that adult Unio crassus individuals can move to any place in a channel after being disturbed by natural or artificially created fluvial processes. Steep banks of the pool, built of fine sediments, represented the best place of refuge.
 
Unio crassus, an endangered freshwater mussel species, inhabits streams with diversified physical structure, subject to frequent changes in channel morphology. It is usually regarded as a sedentary animal, although individual movement has been observed. The hypothesis that adults can use movement in order to actively select a microhabitat was tested in two experiments simulating dislodgement of mussels by a stream. In the first experiment, begun in 2004, individually tagged Unio crassus individuals were distributed in a regular pattern throughout a 17 m long riffle-pool reach of Cedrón River (S Poland). The mussels changed their positions after displacement. The distances travelled differed significantly between parts of the channel: they covered longer distances in the pool (ca 2 m) than in the riffle (ca 0.6 m), with minimal movements on steep banks and dead water areas and large movements in shallows and deep areas. Individuals from shallow places were found to have moved to the steep bank of the pool, built of fine sediments, and to the area of dead water in the lee of boulders. The movements were not related to the water depth gradient: individuals moved to the steep bank even from the deepest parts of the pool, a finding experimentally confirmed with radio-tracked individuals. The second experiment was begun in 2008 in a smaller reach 5 m long. The mussels were put in the deepest part of the reach. Most of them climbed to a steep bank built of fine sediment with minimal flow, and some of them hid beneath the gravel armouring the fast-flowing part of the channel. It can be concluded that adult Unio crassus individuals can move to any place in a channel after being disturbed by natural or artificially created fluvial processes. Steep banks of the pool, built of fine sediments, represented the best place of refuge.
 
Cytogenetic data are increasingly being used in taxonomic analyses and can also be used to investigate phylogenetic patterns. Additionally, studies on genotoxicity using cytogenetic analyses have been demonstrated as an useful tool for biomonitoring. The endangered limpet Patella ferruginea was investigated under karyo and cytological analyses in order to explore the taxonomic status of the two different forms of the species, the phylogenetic relationships and to show up its suitability for future biomonitoring programs. The haploid complement was of n = 9 (5 metacentric, 1 meta-submetacentric, 1 submetacentric, 1 subtelocentric, 1 telocentric), and the ideograms of the two forms failed to establish taxonomic separation between them. P. ferruginea is close to P. rustica according to the karyotypes and recent molecular studies. Finally, several nuclear abnormalities have been detected in the species that could be useful for monitoring the cytotoxic effects on the endangered populations of the species.
 
We infested three fish species, blenny (Salaria fluviatilis), Adriatic sturgeon (Acipenser naccarii) and gambusia (Gambusia holbrooki), with glochidia of the endangered freshwater mussel Margaritifera auricularia at different holding temperatures, and developed a system to grow and maintain cultured juvenile mussels. The sturgeon and blenny were successfully infested, although these fish sloughed the glochidia in the 24°C experiment. Release of juveniles began 30 days post-infestation for sturgeon and 31 days post-infestation for blennies, and excystment occurred over 8 and 10 days, respectively. The total number of juveniles cultured was 2,562. Although the mortality rate was high, juveniles were maintained alive for at least 4 weeks in the four test tanks. In the most successful tank, 13 juveniles were found after 6 weeks (39 days) of culture. Maximum dimensions for juveniles after culture were: length= 325 μm, width= 250 μm, height = 500 μm, indicating a mean increase of 51% in length, 60% in height and 23% in width.
 
A lectotype for Hydrobia acuta (Draparnaud, 1805) was selected by Boeters (1984) from two syntypes found at the Museum National d'Histoire Naturelle in Paris. Although they are here demonstrated to belong to two different species, the type designation is valid and, if accepted, H. acuta becomes a junior synonym of H. ventrosa (Montagu, 1803). In order to conserve the current understanding of H. acuta, an application has been submitted to the ICZN to set aside the type designation of Boeters (1984) and to designate a neotype in line with the earlier and more widely accepted usage of the name.
 
A new species of the genus Nassaria Link, 1807 is described and illustrated from the East China Sea. Nassaria varicosa sp. nov., has a medium sized, broad shell with a peculiar sculpture that distinguishes it from congeners.
 
Sthenorytis retusus (Brocchi 1814). Topotype from San Luca, collected by L. Foresti and published by de Boury (1890: pl. 4, fig. 15). The figure was upside down and larger than the original (which was 22 mm in height).  
Sthenorytis trochiformis (Brocchi 1814). Neotype of Turbo trochiformis Brocchi, 1814, from " Senese " (Museo di Storia Naturale dell'Università di Firenze, no. IGF 8334E); apertural (2), apical (3), basal (4) and right lateral (5) views.  
The taxonomic and nomenclatural status of the two earliest established Mediterranean Sthenorytis species: Turbo retusus Brocchi 1814 and Turbo trochiformis Brocchi 1814, was re-examined. The identity of Turbo retusus remains uncertain because there are no specimens with certain type status or topotypes on which to designate a neotype. In fact, we agree with de Boury (1890) that Brocchi had no specimens of this species and that he described it on the basis of Monti's (1746) figure, the specimen of which has been lost. The identity of Turbo trochiformis was clarified, designating the only existing historical topotype as neotype.
 
Oxychilus alliarius (Miller, 1822) and O. helveticus (Blum, 1881), two west European species sometimes confused with each other, are redescribed. Their identification is easy, but requires both conchological and anatomical characters. The two species are readily distinguished by shell shape and size and internal ornamentation of the penial complex. O. alliarius has a smaller shell (shell diameter: 4.5 - 7.0 mm) with a proportionately larger umbilicus (about 1/6 of shell diameter), usually lacks blackish mantle edge and has internal ornamentation of proximal penis consisting of not more than four longitudinal pleats, usually straight, sometimes slightly wavy, but never laterally branched or papillate. O. helveticus has a larger shell (shell diameter: 7.3-12.2 mm) with proportionately smaller umbilicus (about 1/8 of shell diameter), a blackish mantle edge and internal ornamentation of proximal penis consisting of more than seven longitudinal pleats, sometimes straight and distinct, sometimes wavy, slender and connected by lateral projections giving a reticulate appearance.
 
On the basis of a single specimen from the island of Mauritius, de Blainville described Coriocella nigra as a new species. Quoy and Gaimard made no distinction between this species and Chelyonotus tonganus, from the island of Tonga in the South Pacific. With the help of the museums of natural sciences of Paris and Berlin and observations of seven living specimens of C. nigra and four living specimens of Chel. tonganus, a redescription of these two lamellarids is given.
 
Important populations of Vertigo angustior have been discovered in the Blyth Estuary, Suffolk, England. The habitat for the snail has been created and maintained by the presence of man-made sea walls that spread over more than 30 km. Tltis paper outlines the distribution of the species in the estuary, and its location and microhabitats in the context of the sea wall structures.
 
The invasive Gulf Wedge Clam, Rangia cuneata is reported new to the UK from two sites along an artificial channel joining the lower reaches of the River Witham in Lincolnshire. This bivalve occurred in association with another invasive North American species, the False Dark Mussel, Mytilopsis leucophaeata, at its fourth UK site. Both of these species, known previously only from brackish-water, were living in freshwater associated with typical freshwater molluscs. Shell morphometrics suggest that both species have been present in the channel for at least 6 years, when they are likely to have been introduced as a consequence of discharge of boat ballast water.
 
"Helix" argonautula (Webb & Berthelot, 1833) has been reported from both the Canary Islands and Morocco but the systematic position of this taxa and it's affinity to the Madeiran Geomitrinae (sensu Mandahl-Barth 1950) is unclear. Examination of shell material from Morocco and Canary Islands have revealed two distinct and differing species, hence the taxonomic status is reviewed. Although most authors attribute the initial use of the name "Helix" argonautula to the species on the Canaries, the type specimens (from Terver) are identical to the Moroccan species, hence the Moroccan taxon should take the name argonautula. The species present on the Canary Islands is not Helix argonautula, and a new species name is given and a lectotype designated from Wollaston material in the Melvill-Tomlin Collection. Helix renati Dautzenberg, 1894 has a similar shell form to moroccan shells of "Helix" argonautula. Given that it is possible to have very similar shells for anatomically different animals both names are maintained until anatomical revision is possible. In addition there is a third species with similar shell characters, Xeroleuca antoinei, described by Pallary from this region. Examination of genital anatomy suggests that this species should be placed in the genus Helicella, and the ecology and distribution of this species is described.
 
Combined COI and 16SrDNA data sets (locality numbers in parenthesis) combined haplotypes COI 16SrDNA Distribution 
Distal genitalia of Monacha cartusiana, 11 Italy, Lago di Montepulciano, La Casetta (Siena), G. Manganelli leg. 11.10.1992; 12 Poland, Wrocław, M. Proc´kówProc´ków leg. 20.5.2010. 13-14 Distal genitalia of Monacha claustralis, 13 Bulgaria, Plovdiv, A. Irikov leg. 19.9.2006; 14 Poland, Poznan´-Poznan´Poznan´-Morasko, J. Pien´kowskaPien´Pien´kowska leg. 5.10.2011. Key to acronyms: BC bursa copulatrix, BW body wall, DBC duct of bursa copulatrix, DG digitiform glands, E epiphallus, F flagellum, FO free oviduct, GA genital atrium, GAR genital atrium retractor muscle, P penis, OSD ovispermiduct, V vagina, VA vaginal appendix, VD vas deferens, VS vaginal sac 
Internal structure of the distal genitalia of Monacha cartusiana, 15 Poland, Wrocław, M. Proc´kówProc´ków leg. 20.5.2010; 16 Italy, Lago di Montepulciano, La Casetta (Siena), G. Manganelli leg. 11.10.1992. 17 Internal structure of the distal genitalia of Monacha claustralis Poland, Poznan´-Poznan´Poznan´-Morasko, J. Pien´kowskaPien´Pien´kowska leg. 5.10.2011. Key to acronyms: DP distal penis, for rest of acronyms see Figs 11-14. 
A morphological and molecular (nucleotide sequences of mitochondrial COI and 16SrDNA as well as nuclear ITSZ gene fragments) study confirms the occurrence of a second species of the genus Monacha Kitzinger 1833 in Poland. This species is identified as Monacha claustralis (Rossmässler 1834) by comparison of specimens from Polish, Czech, Bulgarian and Georgian populations. This is also the first identification of M. claustralis in the Czech Republic.
 
Lauria sempronii (Charpentier, 1837) and intergeneric hybrids were found in the Stroud area of Gloucestershire, England, during 2006.
 
Two nominal vitrinid species from Southern Italy and Sicily, Vitrina musignani Pirajno, 1842, and Vitrina paulucciae Fischer in Paulucci, 1878, are revised. The available data supports that they represent a single species belonging to the genus Oligolimax Fischer in Paulucci, 1878: Oligolimax musignani. This species constitutes the smallest species of Oligolimax and is characterized by protoconch with a few pits near suture of first half whorl and fine, wavy, radial, rather widely and regularly spaced, irregularly branched periostracal crests; teleoconch with fine, radial, closely and regularly spaced ribs; genitalia with large wide glandula amatoria almost entirely covered by thick glandular layer.
 
Among the freshwater mussel family Margaritiferidae the Asian species are the least known. One of these, Margaritinopsis dahurica, occurs in the Amur River and Maritime province drainage systems of eastern Russia. A second taxon, M. sujfunensis, has been distinguished from M. dahurica OH the basis of height/length ratio of the shell. The availability of several specimens assigned to these taxa has permitted a study of the shell and anatomy. Height/length ratios varied little within the sample and no clear pattern was discerned supporting a two species concept. Nevertheless, the shell characteristics of M. dahurica sensu lato clearly distinguish it from all other margaritiferid species. The anatomy of M. dahurica reveals that the species is correctly assigned to the Margaritiferidae.
 
Morphological comparison of the two congeneric allopatric camaenid land snails, Chloritis bifoveata (Benson 1856) and C. diplochone Mollendorff 1898, was evaluated. Both species show strong similarities in some unique characters such as the extraordinary biconcave shell shape. However, the species differ in shell size with C. bifoveata the smaller of the two, and also in length of the penis and vagina, again shorter in C. bifoveata. The penis and vagina are of almost equal length and size in C. bifoveata are almost equal but in C. diplochone the penis is longer and more slender than the vagina. The distributions of the species are also very different with C. bifoveata occurring in southern Myanmar, Thailand and northern Malaysia and C. diplochone in eastern Thailand to the Indochina region.
 
We describe the shell, soft anatomy, and reproduction of the montacutid bivalve, Koreamya arcuata (A. Adams, 1856) gen. nov. Contrary to most montacutids the outer demibranch has been preserved, although in a reduced state. The species is a protandrous consecutive hermaphrodite which stores sperm in a groove-shaped ctenidial seminal receptacle. The particular type of sperm receptacle and the presence of a lithodesma in Koreamya indicate an affinity to Montacutona Yamamoto & Habe, 1959, but the shells of the two differ widely in shape and proportions. The species is a commensal, and lives permanently attached to the valves near the shell gape of Lingula anatina at several Korean intertidal flats. It is also known from the Philippines, SE India and W Australia.
 
Recently (2009-2010) collected freshwater molluscs in NE Algeria revealed 8 species of freshwater gastropods, of which Stagnicola fuscus (C. Pfeiffer 1821) is new for this region. In addition we found Bithynia numidica Bourguignat 1864, which has not been mentioned in the literature since its original description, which we compared with syntypes of Bithynia numidica. So we can provide the anatomy of the species under discussion for the first time.
 
Syntypes of Planorbis agraulus Bourguignat, 1864 are compared with a recently collected Planorbis sp. which could be indentified as P. agraulus, too. So we can provide the anatomy of the species under discussion for the first time. Comparisons with data in the literature showed us that P. agraulus is possibly not in Italy and thus is not conspecific with Planorbis moquini Requien, 1848. So the question arose which Planorbis spp. live in Italy.
 
Two new species, Mitromorpha (Mitrolumna) braziliensis sp. nov. and M. (M.) canopusensis sp. nov., are described from the western Atlantic off Brazil. These are the only species of Mitromorpha with body sculpture dominated by spiral ridges rather than with a well developed axial sculpture.
 
A clarification of the status of Isomeria morula (Hidalgo 1870) is given, based on the recently rediscovered, likely type specimen at Museo Nacional de Ciencias Naturales (MNCN, Madrid, Spain), and additional material from University of Michigan Museum of Zoology (UMMZ, Ann Arbor USA). The available material (three specimens) comes from older collections (i.e., mid- to late 1800's)from Ecuador. The specimen at MNCN is here designated as the lectotype of I. morula (Hidalgo 1870). Conchological characteristics are discussed and this species is fully illustrated for the first time. Comparisons of this taxon with other Isomeria from western South America and a partial key are also given, thus contributing to clarifying its status and recognizing it from other species in the genus. The geographic distribution of I. morula and its conservation status remain unknown.
 
With the aim of clarifying the taxonomical status of Helix semipicta Hidalgo, 1870 its locus typicus has been sampled intensively and the specimens collected have been compared with the syntypes deposited in the Museo Nacional de Ciencias Naturales in Madrid. Furthermore the shell and the reproductive system of Helix semipicta have been compared to specimens of Helicella cistorum (Morelet, 1845), the most similar Iberian hygromide, and the conclusion that Helix semipicta Hidalgo, 1870 is a junior synonym of Helix cistorum Morelet, 1845, has been made, further amplifying the known distribution of this species.
 
In this paper the first particular records of the pill clam Pisidium globulare Clessin, 1873 from the Czech Republic and Slovakia are published. All these data were obtained by revision of extensive voucher material (altogether 642 lots from a similar number of sites). Altogether, P. globulare was found in 18 sites in the Czech Republic and in one site in Slovakia. Results of pore density measurement and ecological preferences of the species are compared with published data and conclusions are presented.
 
Top-cited authors
Robert A D Cameron
  • The University of Sheffield
Graham Oliver
  • National Museum Wales
Roy Anderson
  • Queen's University Belfast
Peter Glöer
  • Biodiversitiy Research Laboratory
Anna M. Holmes
  • National Museum Wales