International Journal of Contemporary Education

Published by Redfame Publishing
Online ISSN: 2575-3177
Publications
Correlations between Demands and Burnout
Correlations between Resources and Burnout
Article
Burnout in teachers has been broadly investigated, but no studies have investigated burnout in teachers during a pandemic. The current study is based on a survey of 1278 Canadian teachers and examined whether the Job Demands-Resources model was a useful lens for examining teacher burnout in this unprecedented context. Results supported the model in general terms in that most demands were most strongly correlated with the initial exhaustion stage of burnout. However, not all resources were most strongly associated with the later stages of burnout, suggesting that the examination of specific resources in the context of a pandemic as opposed to examining resources together as a latent variable contributes to development of a more refined model. Suggestions for supporting teachers’ welfare are provided.
 
Analysis of pre-test results
Comparison of pre-test and post-test scores
Results of 3K class students in the English writing examination from last year (2018)
Marking scheme for pre-test and post-test
Fieldnote format (semi-structured interview)
Article
21st Century Learning is a student-centered learning process that has been introduced in Malaysia since 2014. This study aims to integrate the 4C elements, which are collaboration, communication, creativity, and critical thinking in the interventions to improve English writing skill among 3K class students. Also, the study was conducted to determine how peer guidance can help 3K class students, who were weak in writing, to improve their English writing skills. The action research was carried out based on Kurt Lewin's Model. The research instruments involved were pre-test, post-test, and semi-structured interview. A total of 32 students sat for both pre-test and post-test before and after the interventions. A semi-structured interview consisting of five questions was conducted after the student completed the post-test. Descriptive statistics involving mean and percentage scores were used to analyze pre-test and post-test findings, while the interview findings were summarized. The results showed that there was an improvement in their English writing skills, where the mean score for the pre-test was 19.34, while the mean score for post-test was 22.66. The findings indicate that weaker students agreed that guidance of students who possess better writing skills helped them improve their English writing skills. The results of the pre-test and post-test showed that the intervention conducted has successfully helped 3K class students to improve their English writing skills.
 
Demographic Characteristics of Participating Teachers
Teacher Evaluation of Workshop Sessions
Summary of Results for Planning and Team Teachers
Article
Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) is a persistent pattern of behaviours characterized by inattention, hyperactivity and impulsivity. Teaching children with ADHD is more stressful than teaching children without the disorder. This study examines teachers reaction towards a tailored Incredible Years Teacher Classroom Management programme aimed to enhance classroom management skills of a group of 10 teachers of children with ADHD symptoms in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. This is the first study to evaluate the Incredible Years Teacher Classroom Management programme in African context. A one-group posttest-only experimental design was implemented. Ten teachers received the tailored Incredible Years Teacher training in a full-day session once a week for six weeks. The teachers drafted intervention plans at each session and implemented the strategies the following weeks in their classrooms. The teachers participated in an individual coaching sessions every week to help with implementation of the learned strategies and assess their level of performance. The teachers completed various structured and semi-structured questionnaires at the end of the intervention. The result of the study indicated that teachers were satisfied with the delivery of the programme; its content and practicality. Teachers reported that they were happy with the effects of the programme on children’s behaviour in the classroom. The teachers also indicated that they would recommend the programme to other colleagues. In light of the findings, teachers’ reaction, limitations and implications for future research were discussed.
 
The responses on teachers' roles and needs
The responses on the adequacy of educational environment
Article
Second language acquisition (SLA) researchers, language teachers and teacher trainers aim to develop an approach through which languages are effectively taught in the classroom. This paper provides an overview of Communicative Language Teaching (CLT) including its definition, advantages and disadvantages as well as some criticisms made against it. It aims to investigate L2 Arabic teachers’ attitude towards CLT at King Abdulaziz University. The current data were assembled via teachers’ questionnaire. It was found out that in spite of revealing the agreements in the majority of the statements which infers a positive attitude towards CLT, the participants stated that CLT is not suitable and preferable. Several explanations were provided to justify this statement. The provided explanations led to assume that the unsuitability and the dispreference of CLT are built on practical constraints which could be overcome.
 
The Percentage of Skills Emerged from Each ABLLS-R Repertoire
The Percentage of Skills Mastered from Each ABLLS-R Repertoire
The development of the Receptive Language repertoire from the Basic Learner skills section of the ABLLS-R
The development of the Math repertoire from the Academic skills section of the ABLLS-R
Article
Many assessments used to measure the skills of children with an autism spectrum disorder (ASD) diagnosis lack data that delineates patterns of skill development by neurotypical children. In the current pilot study, we administered the Assessment of Basic Language and Learning Skills-Revised (ABLLS-R) to neurotypical children (N = 53) between the ages of six and 72 months to examine typical skill development across the major skill sets and repertoires of the ABLLS-R. We found that skills from the Basic Learner skills section emerged and developed earlier (i.e., by age five) than those from the other skills sections. By age six, children mastered their motor skills and 90% of the self-help skills. Academic skills took the longest to emerge and develop with children mastering only 51% of the related skills by age six. Implications of these findings, as they relate to skill development and identifying developmentally appropriate teaching objectives for individuals with ASD, are discussed.
 
Article
This study sought to determine the main leadership style used by clinical professors and other educational leaders in academic settings as well as the leadership style they used when teaching in clinical settings. There were eight (n = 8) voluntary interprofessional educational leaders who took part in this study. It was determined that the servant leadership style was predominantly being practiced among these clinical professors in the healthcare setting; whereas, the coaching leadership style was preferred for educational purposes. This research demonstrated that there was a consistent pattern among professors who practiced in the health sector relied on the servant leadership style predominantly and this stemmed from their clinical background and experiences. It was unanimous that while teaching and interacting with a student in the academic environment, all participants practiced the coaching leadership style.
 
Article
This reflection aims to offer a contribution on some of the main challenges that academics have to face in their professional practice. To this end, we will analyse two components of the academic’s activity – teaching and research –, as well as the potentialities of their association, mobilising in this reflection the authors’ academic experience, especially in the disciplinary field of Sociology. It is concluded that, despite the academic’s high expertise, there are several instigations that lead us to consider the need for a permanent update, so as to encourage, in an intentional and successful way, his/her action.
 
Article
In an educational setting, the management and environment are bound to affect the whole learning environment. This study determines the impact of the Ramon Aboitiz Foundation Incorporated School Rehabilitation Program (RAFI-SRP) to beneficiary schools. The Descriptive-correlational design is utilized to establish the level of assessments for school buildings regarding its milieu, environment, management, and students’ academic performance during their occupancy of the RAFI classrooms. In the exploratory data analyses, multivariate principal component analysis (PCA) and regression are used. Results show that RAFI-SRP affects school management. The more new school buildings are built, the better is the performance of the school administrators. Moreover, RAFI-SRP has a modest influence on the academic performance of students among the community beneficiaries as a whole. This result may be owed to the fact that academic performance is multifactorial, such that the interplay of factors may be intrinsic and extrinsic. RAFI-SRP is just one amongst the extrinsic factors to the learners' academic performance to contend with.
 
Article
This research article is setting up an outlined-linguistic-overview regarding to the use of the “Tilde” in the writing context of Spanish Language. The study looked over various-literature-materials from different sources and added new-insights into its contextual framework to expose Spanish-language-Orthography such as Words-Type; Accents-Type; Vocabulary and Grammar-Patterns. The use of the “tilde” in teaching and learning Spanish as Second Foreign Language (ELE) continue to be a focus of concern and discussion among Spanish language teachers as well as the learners of this particular foreign language subject (FLs). Numerous studies have emphasized on the need to provide accuracy-learning-materials in relation to this orthography-linguistic-trait. Consequently to this observation, the study aimed to deliver valuable text-references through which Spanish language learners know about the application of the “Tilde” in the writing system of Spanish language. Furthermore, methodological schemes are provided to assist Spanish language teachers in formatting and delivering Spanish-language-assignments that fit into the subject-matter-discussed.
 
Article
The present study is intended to construct a college EFL self-access writing mode based on automated feedback under the guidance of Formative Assessment Theory and Autonomous Learning Theory and attempts to apply it into college EFL teaching practice. Findings of this empirical-based study suggest that this self-access writing mode contributes to the enhancement of students’ English writing competence, English writing motivation as well as their autonomy in self-revision.
 
Article
Positive influence of parental involvement on their children’s academic performance has been widely reported and proved in a good number of research. However, little attention has been given to the negative influence that the high parental expectations may cause to their children performance and motivation. This current study investigates the parental high expectations on their children academic achievement and motivation. It also attempts to explore the adolescents’ perception of the influence of their parent’ expectations on their motivation. To do this, 160 middle and high school students in a public school were surveyed and seven were interviewed to collect data. The results showed that children achievement did not seem to get noticeably worse at a certain task that were pressured into doing, but rather they got exactly what their parents want from them. They also revealed that parents usually decide the expectations without estimating their children’s abilities and interests. Based on the results analysis, some implications and recommendations are provided for parents and educators to consider supporting adolescents in their academic journey.
 
Article
Identifying an effective instructional strategy to help diverse learners reach their full potentials is a goal for educators. Differentiated instruction has received much attention as a possible strategy. The purpose of this quasi-experimental study was to examine the effect of incorporating differentiated instructional practices on students’ achievement in the kindergarten classes. In this action research, the researcher sought to answer the following research question: Does incorporating differentiated instructional practices leads to significant increase in students’ achievement in the kindergarten classes? Two kindergarten classes with 38 students and 2 teachers participated in the study; one was assigned to an experimental group who received differentiated instructional strategies for 3 weeks and the other one to the control group who received traditional teaching practices. Data was collected, analyzed and compared using SPSS and independent sample t-test. Results revealed that there was no significant difference in student achievement results between the differentiated and non-differentiated classrooms. Findings of this study highlight the necessity for further explorations on the effect of differentiated instructional practices on achievement results in the kindergarten classrooms.
 
Article
Persistence and increased retention is a major focus in higher educational administration. The first-years of transition to college is a multi-dimensional new academic experience, noncognitive, and social challenges, often a disorienting period which can lead to academic difficulties. This review examines the literature for strategies, institutional policies and approaches for effective retention and first-year students’ success programs supported by evidence that contributes to satisfactory student performance, persistence and retention in post-secondary education. This review aim to develop a knowledgeable perspective on higher educational integrated and collaborative guiding principles for refining student learning and success efforts for improvements in student performance, persistence, and retention. The implications for practice are discussed and recommendations for of institution-wide collaborative critical strategies supported by data proven effective for the promotion, retention and success of first-year students’ success is provided.
 
Article
International Journal of Contemporary Education (IJCE) would like to acknowledge the following reviewers for their assistance with peer review of manuscripts for this issue. Many authors, regardless of whether IJCE publishes their work, appreciate the helpful feedback provided by the reviewers. Their comments and suggestions were of great help to the authors in improving the quality of their papers. Each of the reviewers listed below returned at least one review for this issue.Reviewers for Volume 2, Number 1Alexandra Ingram, University of Tennessee, USAAurora Q. Pestano, University of San Jose Recoletos, PhilippinesBruna Gabriela Augusto Marçal Vieira, Universidade Estadual Paulista, BrazilCarme Pinya, University of Balearic Islands, SpainChan Chang Tik, Monash University Malaysia, MalaysiaDina Radeljas, Mohawk Valley Community College, USADorota Celinska, Roosevelt University, USAFederica Cornali, University of Turin, ItalyFroilan Delute Mobo, Philippine Merchant Marine Academy, PhilippinesGiuseppe Maugeri, Ca' Foscari University, ItalyIonel Bondoc, University of Agricultural Sciences and Veterinary Medicine Iasi, RomaniaIosif Fragkoulis, Hellenic Open University, GreeceJavier Fombona, Univ. Oviedo, SpainMakrina Nina Zafiri, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, GreeceMatthew Schatt, University of Florida, USAMurat Tezer, Near East University, CyprusNesrin Ozturk, Ege University, TurkeyNilgün Tosun, Trakya University, TurkeyNoelia Navarro Gómez, Universidad de Almería, SpainRaymond Aaron Younis, ACU Australia, AustraliaRochelle Ge, University of Saint Joseph, MacaoSandro Sehic, Oneida BOCES, USAVassiliki Pliogou, Metropolitan College of Thessaloniki, GreeceXiaojing Sun, Utrecht University, The NetherlandsWilliam OscarEditorial AssistantInternational Journal of Contemporary Education---------------------------------------------------------Redfame Publishing9450 SW Gemini Dr. #99416Beaverton, OR 97008, USATel: 1-503-828-0536 ext. 509Fax: 1-503-828-0537E-mail: ijce@redfame.comURL: http://ijce.redfame.com
 
Article
International Journal of Contemporary Education (IJCE) would like to acknowledge the following reviewers for their assistance with peer review of manuscripts for this issue. Many authors, regardless of whether IJCE publishes their work, appreciate the helpful feedback provided by the reviewers. Their comments and suggestions were of great help to the authors in improving the quality of their papers. Each of the reviewers listed below returned at least one review for this issue.Reviewers for Volume 5, Number 1 Ahmad Suradi, State Islamic Institute of Bengkulu, IndonesiaAurora Q. Pestano, University of San Jose Recoletos, PhilippinesBožić-Lenard Dragana, University of Osijek Croatia, CroatiaDina Radeljas, Mohawk Valley Community College, USAEdward Bolden, Case Western Reserve University, USAFederica Cornali, University of Turin, ItalyGiuseppe Maugeri, University of Urbino, ItalyInaad M Sayer, University of Human Development, IraqIvan Lenard, Elementary School Ladimirevci, CroatiaMatthew Schatt, University of Florida, USANesrin Ozturk, Ege University, TurkeyQiu Yuan, Gannan Normal University, ChinaSaid K. Juma, State University of Zanzibar, TanzaniaVassiliki Pliogou, Metropolitan College of Thessaloniki, GreeceVassilios Papadimitriou, University of Thessaly, Greece William OscarEditorial AssistantInternational Journal of Contemporary Education------------------------------------------------------------Redfame Publishing9450 SW Gemini Dr. #99416Beaverton, OR 97008, USATel: 1-503-828-0536 ext. 509Fax: 1-503-828-0537E-mail 1: ijce@redfame.comE-mail 2: ijce@redfame.orgURL: http://ijce.redfame.com
 
Article
International Journal of Contemporary Education (IJCE) would like to acknowledge the following reviewers for their assistance with peer review of manuscripts for this issue. Many authors, regardless of whether IJCE publishes their work, appreciate the helpful feedback provided by the reviewers. Their comments and suggestions were of great help to the authors in improving the quality of their papers. Each of the reviewers listed below returned at least one review for this issue.Reviewers for Volume 3, Number 1Alexandra Ingram, University of Tennessee, USAÁlvaro Manzano Redondo, UCJC University, SpainAurora Q. Pestano, University of San Jose Recoletos, PhilippinesBlessing Dwumah Manu, Jiangsu University, GhanaBožić-Lenard Dragana, University of Osijek Croatia, CroatiaBruna Gabriela Augusto Marçal Vieira, CEFET-MG, BrazilDina Radeljas, Mohawk Valley Community College, USAEdward Bolden, Case Western Reserve University, USAFroilan Delute Mobo, Philippine Merchant Marine Academy, PhilippinesGraziano Serragiotto, Ca' Foscari University of Venice, ItalyIosif Fragkoulis, Hellenic Open University, GreeceLi Li, Bath Spa University, UKMatthew Schatt, University of Florida, USAMurat Tezer, Near East University, CyprusNesrin Ozturk, Ege University, TurkeyRaymond Aaron Younis, ACU Australia, AustraliaSuriadi Samsuri, Institute of Islamic Religion Sultan Muhammad Syafiuddin Sambas, IndonesiaTeresa Pozo-Rico, University of Alicante, SpainVassilios Papadimitriou, University of Thessaly, Greece William OscarEditorial AssistantInternational Journal of Contemporary Education---------------------------------------------------------Redfame Publishing9450 SW Gemini Dr. #99416Beaverton, OR 97008, USATel: 1-503-828-0536 ext. 509Fax: 1-503-828-0537E-mail 1: ijce@redfame.comE-mail 2: ijce@redfame.orgURL: http://ijce.redfame.com
 
Article
International Journal of Contemporary Education (IJCE) would like to acknowledge the following reviewers for their assistance with peer review of manuscripts for this issue. Many authors, regardless of whether IJCE publishes their work, appreciate the helpful feedback provided by the reviewers. Their comments and suggestions were of great help to the authors in improving the quality of their papers. Each of the reviewers listed below returned at least one review for this issue.Reviewers for Volume 4, Number 1 Aurora Q. Pestano, University of San Jose Recoletos, PhilippinesAziz Moummou, Ministry of Education, MoroccoBlessing Dwumah Manu, Jiangsu University, GhanaBožić-Lenard Dragana, University of Osijek Croatia, CroatiaBruna Gabriela Augusto Marçal Vieira, CEFET-MG, BrazilDina Radeljas, Mohawk Valley Community College, USAEdward Bolden, Case Western Reserve University, USAFederica Cornali, University of Turin, ItalyGiuseppe Maugeri, Ca' Foscari University, ItalyGraziano Serragiotto, Ca' Foscari University of Venice, ItalyInaad M Sayer, University of Human Development, IraqLi Li, Bath Spa University, UKMakrina Nina Zafiri, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, GreeceMatthew Schatt, University of Florida, USANilgün Tosun, Trakya University, TurkeyRaymond Aaron Younis, ACU Australia, AustraliaTeresa Pozo-Rico, University of Alicante, SpainVassiliki Pliogou, Metropolitan College of Thessaloniki, GreeceVassilios Papadimitriou, University of Thessaly, Greece William OscarEditorial AssistantInternational Journal of Contemporary Education------------------------------------------------------------Redfame Publishing9450 SW Gemini Dr. #99416Beaverton, OR 97008, USATel: 1-503-828-0536 ext. 509Fax: 1-503-828-0537E-mail 1: ijce@redfame.comE-mail 2: ijce@redfame.orgURL: http://ijce.redfame.com
 
Article
International Journal of Contemporary Education (IJCE) would like to acknowledge the following reviewers for their assistance with peer review of manuscripts for this issue. Many authors, regardless of whether IJCE publishes their work, appreciate the helpful feedback provided by the reviewers. Their comments and suggestions were of great help to the authors in improving the quality of their papers. Each of the reviewers listed below returned at least one review for this issue.Reviewers for Volume 1, Number 2 Alexandra Ingram, University of Tennessee, USACarme Pinya, University of Balearic Islands, SpainCristina Simões, Portuguese Catholic University, PortugalDorota Celinska, Roosevelt University, USAFederica Cornali, University of Turin, ItalyFroilan Delute Mobo, Philippine Merchant Marine Academy, PhilippinesGiuseppe Maugeri, Ca' Foscari University, ItalyIonel Bondoc, University of Agricultural Sciences and Veterinary Medicine Iasi, RomaniaIosif Fragkoulis, Hellenic Open University, GreeceLucilia Falcão, University of Fortaleza -UNIFOR, BrazilMakrina Nina Zafiri, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, GreeceMatthew Schatt, University of Florida, USABruna Gabriela Augusto Marçal Vieira, Universidade Estadual Paulista, BrazilNatalia V. Andraphanova, Kuban State University, RussiaNesrin Ozturk, Ege University, TurkeyNoelia Navarro Gómez, Universidad de Almería, SpainRaymond Aaron Younis, ACU Australia, AustraliaSaid K. Juma, The State University of Zanzibar, FinlandSandro Sehic, Oneida BOCES, USASandro Serpa, University of the Azores, PortugalVassiliki Pliogou, Metropolitan College of Thessaloniki, GreeceVassilios Papadimitriou, University of Thessaly, Greece William OscarEditorial AssistantInternational Journal of Contemporary Education---------------------------------------------------------Redfame Publishing9450 SW Gemini Dr. #99416Beaverton, OR 97008, USATel: 1-503-828-0536 ext. 509Fax: 1-503-828-0537E-mail: ijce@redfame.comURL: http://ijce.redfame.com
 
Article
Reviewer AcknowledgementsInternational Journal of Contemporary Education (IJCE) would like to acknowledge the following reviewers for their assistance with peer review of manuscripts for this issue. Many authors, regardless of whether IJCE publishes their work, appreciate the helpful feedback provided by the reviewers. Their comments and suggestions were of great help to the authors in improving the quality of their papers. Each of the reviewers listed below returned at least one review for this issue.Reviewers for Volume 4, Number 2 Ahmad Suradi, State Islamic Institute of Bengkulu, IndonesiaAurora Q. Pestano, University of San Jose Recoletos, PhilippinesAziz Moummou, Ministry of Education, MoroccoBožić-Lenard Dragana, University of Osijek Croatia, CroatiaBruna Gabriela Augusto Marçal Vieira, CEFET-MG, BrazilCarme Pinya, University of Balearic Islands, SpainEdward Bolden, Case Western Reserve University, USAFederica Cornali, University of Turin, ItalyGiuseppe Maugeri, University of Urbino, ItalyGraziano Serragiotto, Ca' Foscari University of Venice, ItalyIvan Lenard, Elementary School Ladimirevci, CroatiaSuriadi Samsuri, Institute of Islamic Religion Sultan Muhammad Syafiuddin Sambas, IndonesiaTeresa Pozo-Rico, University of Alicante, SpainVassiliki Pliogou, Metropolitan College of Thessaloniki, Greece William OscarEditorial AssistantInternational Journal of Contemporary Education------------------------------------------------------------Redfame Publishing9450 SW Gemini Dr. #99416Beaverton, OR 97008, USATel: 1-503-828-0536 ext. 509Fax: 1-503-828-0537E-mail 1: ijce@redfame.comE-mail 2: ijce@redfame.orgURL: http://ijce.redfame.com
 
Article
International Journal of Contemporary Education (IJCE) would like to acknowledge the following reviewers for their assistance with peer review of manuscripts for this issue. Many authors, regardless of whether IJCE publishes their work, appreciate the helpful feedback provided by the reviewers. Their comments and suggestions were of great help to the authors in improving the quality of their papers. Each of the reviewers listed below returned at least one review for this issue.Reviewers for Volume 2, Number 2Alexandra Ingram, University of Tennessee, USAÁlvaro Manzano Redondo, UCJC University, SpainAurora Q. Pestano, University of San Jose Recoletos, PhilippinesBlessing Dwumah Manu, Jiangsu University, GhanaDina Radeljas, Mohawk Valley Community College, USAFederica Cornali, University of Turin, ItalyFroilan Delute Mobo, Philippine Merchant Marine Academy, PhilippinesGiuseppe Maugeri, Ca' Foscari University, ItalyInaad M Sayer, University of Human Development, IraqIonel Bondoc, University of Agricultural Sciences and Veterinary Medicine Iasi, RomaniaIosif Fragkoulis, Hellenic Open University, GreeceJavier Fombona, Univ. Oviedo, SpainLi Li, Bath Spa University, UKMakrina Nina Zafiri, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, GreeceMatthew Schatt, University of Florida, USAMs. Bruna Gabriela Augusto Marçal Vieira, Universidade Estadual Paulista, BrazilMurat Tezer, Near East University, CyprusNesrin Ozturk, Ege University, TurkeyNoelia Navarro Gómez, Universidad de Almería, SpainRaymond Aaron Younis, ACU Australia, AustraliaSaid K. Juma, State University of Zanzibar, TanzaniaSandro Sehic, Oneida BOCES, USASuriadi Samsuri, Institute of Islamic Religion Sultan Muhammad Syafiuddin Sambas, IndonesiaTeresa Pozo-Rico, University of Alicante, SpainVassiliki Pliogou, Metropolitan College of Thessaloniki, GreeceVassilios Papadimitriou, University of Thessaly, GreeceXiaojing Sun, Utrecht University, The Netherlands William OscarEditorial AssistantInternational Journal of Contemporary Education---------------------------------------------------------Redfame Publishing9450 SW Gemini Dr. #99416Beaverton, OR 97008, USATel: 1-503-828-0536 ext. 509Fax: 1-503-828-0537E-mail: ijce@redfame.comURL: http://ijce.redfame.com
 
Article
International Journal of Contemporary Education (IJCE) would like to acknowledge the following reviewers for their assistance with peer review of manuscripts for this issue. Many authors, regardless of whether IJCE publishes their work, appreciate the helpful feedback provided by the reviewers. Their comments and suggestions were of great help to the authors in improving the quality of their papers. Each of the reviewers listed below returned at least one review for this issue.Reviewers for Volume 3, Number 2 Aurora Q. Pestano, University of San Jose Recoletos, PhilippinesAziz Moummou, Ministry of Education, MoroccoBlessing Dwumah Manu, Jiangsu University, GhanaBožić-Lenard Dragana, University of Osijek Croatia, CroatiaBruna Gabriela Augusto Marçal Vieira, CEFET-MG, BrazilDina Radeljas, Mohawk Valley Community College, USAEdward Bolden, Case Western Reserve University, USAFederica Cornali, University of Turin, ItalyFroilan Delute Mobo, Philippine Merchant Marine Academy, PhilippinesGiuseppe Maugeri, Ca' Foscari University, ItalyGraziano Serragiotto, Ca' Foscari University of Venice, ItalyInaad M Sayer, University of Human Development, IraqIosif Fragkoulis, Hellenic Open University, GreeceJavier Fombona, Univ. Oviedo, SpainLi Li, Bath Spa University, UKMatthew Schatt, University of Florida, USAMurat Tezer, Near East University, CyprusNesrin Ozturk, Ege University, TurkeyRaymond Aaron Younis, ACU Australia, AustraliaSaid K. Juma, State University of Zanzibar, TanzaniaSandro Sehic, Oneida BOCES, USASuriadi Samsuri, Institute of Islamic Religion Sultan Muhammad Syafiuddin Sambas, IndonesiaTeresa Pozo-Rico, University of Alicante, SpainVassiliki Pliogou, Metropolitan College of Thessaloniki, Greece William OscarEditorial AssistantInternational Journal of Contemporary Education------------------------------------------------------------Redfame Publishing9450 SW Gemini Dr. #99416Beaverton, OR 97008, USATel: 1-503-828-0536 ext. 509Fax: 1-503-828-0537E-mail 1: ijce@redfame.comE-mail 2: ijce@redfame.orgURL: http://ijce.redfame.com
 
Article
International Journal of Contemporary Education (IJCE) would like to acknowledge the following reviewers for their assistance with peer review of manuscripts for this issue. Many authors, regardless of whether IJCE publishes their work, appreciate the helpful feedback provided by the reviewers. Their comments and suggestions were of great help to the authors in improving the quality of their papers. Each of the reviewers listed below returned at least one review for this issue.Reviewers for Volume 1, Number 1 Alexandra Ingram, University of Tennessee, USAArvind Sharma, Dr. Shakuntala Misra National Rehabilitation University, IndiaBruna Gabriela Augusto Marçal Vieira, Universidade Estadual Paulista, BrazilCarme Pinya, University of Balearic Islands, SpainCristina Simões, Portuguese Catholic University, PortugalFederica Cornali, University of Turin, ItalyFroilan Delute Mobo, Philippine Merchant Marine Academy, PhilippinesGiuseppe Maugeri, Ca' Foscari University, ItalyIonel Bondoc, University of Agricultural Sciences and Veterinary Medicine Iasi, RomaniaIosif Fragkoulis, Hellenic Open University, GreeceJavier Fombona, Univ. Oviedo, SpainMakrina Nina Zafiri, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, GreeceNesrin Ozturk, Ege University, TurkeyNilgün Tosun, Trakya University, TurkeySaid K. Juma, The State University of Zanzibar, FinlandSandro Sehic, Oneida BOCES, USAVassiliki Pliogou, Metropolitan College of Thessaloniki, Greece William OscarEditorial AssistantInternational Journal of Contemporary Education---------------------------------------------------------Redfame Publishing9450 SW Gemini Dr. #99416Beaverton, OR 97008, USATel: 1-503-828-0536 ext. 509Fax: 1-503-828-0537E-mail: ijce@redfame.comURL: http://ijce.redfame.com
 
Article
Recently, an increase interest in the acquisition of grammatical gender by second language (L2) learners has been revealed. This paper investigated the acquisition of Arabic, a language that has a rich grammatical gender system, by speakers of a first language (L1) that does not have gender (English). Arabic demonstrative pronouns selected as the linguistic feature to be investigated. Due to the gender differentiations, Arabic has nearly ten demonstrative pronouns whereas English has four demonstrative pronouns. Consequently, learnability considerations, the Full Transfer/Full Access (FT/FA) hypothesis presumes that English learners of Arabic will have the ability to acquire L2 grammatical gender despite the absence of these systems in their L1. However, the Failed Functional Features (FFF) hypothesis predicts that English learners of Arabic cannot acquire these systems since they are not available in their L1. This paper investigated the ability of English learners of Arabic in acquiring the Arabic demonstrative pronouns with their gender as accurate as native speakers of Arabic do. Moreover, does the proficiency level play a role in the acquisition of demonstratives? Finally, which hypothesis will be supported by the findings? It was found that L2 learners did not acquire the phenomenon as accurate as the native speakers did. Furthermore, proficiency level played a role in the acquisition of demonstratives as a significant disparity between L2 learners’ levels was appeared. Finally, the current outcomes could be attributed to FT/FA hypothesis.
 
Examples of the two different structures with 'tell'
Article
This article conducts a bidirectional investigation of the earlier acquisition of dative structures in English and Arabic by Second Language (L2) learners. It reports on two dative structures: the Prepositional Dative (PD) structure and the Double Object Dative (DOD) structure, rating experiments (grammaticality judgment task) to test which dative structure is preferred earlier by L2 learners and whether L2 learners transfer their preferences relating to the two dative structures in the First Language (L1) to their L2. A total of 50 Arab learners of English and 40 English learners of Arabic were tested for the purpose of this study. It was observed that Arab learners of English preferred the PD structure over the DOD structure, whereas English learners of Arabic showed a slight preference for the use of the DOD structure; however, this observation is statistically insignificant. These findings indicate a lack of L1 influence, as all L2 learners preferred a dative structure that does not correspond to the preferred structure in their L1. Such findings could be consistent with the idea of the language acquisition process, as proposed by the Processability Theory, which implies that constructions that are easiest to process will be learned earlier than those that are harder to process despite the convergences between L1 and L2.
 
Means and standard deviations for event groups during AAA activities
Article
Two hundred forty-two students, including 76 college students and 166 university students from Canadian post-secondary schools, participated in a pre-post study of the effects of animal-assisted activities on their stress, happiness, and well-being. Findings showed that those students who had recently experienced a negative event showed significantly greater positive effects of the animal-assisted activities on all three dependent variables when compared with other students, although all students benefitted from participating in terms of desired effects on their stress, happiness, and well-being. In keeping with Keyes’ model of mental wellness, these school-based, animal-assisted activities are supported as low-cost, low-stigma, universal approaches to mental health promotion.
 
Article
This paper focuses on analyzing courtroom questioning as a dynamic process of adaptation to the psychological motivations, which is complicated by the constantly changing communicative context. By analyzing the data collected from the Chinese courtroom trials, such strategies as repetition, reformulation and juxtaposition are found in the process of questioners’ making adaptation to their psychological motivations. By carefully choosing the strategies catering to different psychological motivations, questioners can successfully realize adaptation so as to achieve their specific communicative goals.
 
Article
This paper focuses on analyzing courtroom questioning as a dynamic process of adaptation to the institutional power by recourse to intimidation and topic management. Institutional power is the important factor which motivates the questioners’ linguistic choice. By adapting their questioning to the institutional power, questioners can succeed in bringing the defendant, especially the hardened criminals, under their control so that their authority as institutional representatives will be maintained, which is essential to ensure the solemnity and effectiveness of courtroom trial.
 
Intermediate Model of regulatory emotion self-efficacy
Descriptive statistics and correlations of mobile phone addiction tendency, emotional state and regulatory emotion self-efficacy
Mediating effect of regulatory emotion self-efficacy on mobile phone addiction tendency and emotional state
Article
In order to explore the situation of college students’ emotional state, regulatory emotion self-efficacy and mobile phone addiction tendency as well as their relationships, a total of 350 college students were assessed with Mobile Phone Addiction Tendency Scale (MPATS), Positive Affect and Negative Affect Scale (PANAS) and the Scale of Regulatory Emotional Self-efficacy (SRESE). The result showed that: (1) 40.86% of college students had the tendency of cell phone addiction, which was serious; 72.0% of college students were in a positive emotional state, 22% were in a negative emotional state; college students' regulatory emotion self-efficacy was in the middle level; (2) there was no gender, grade, major type, household registration type (rural and urban) and whether only child difference in mobile phone addiction tendency; (3) the positive emotions of college students were negatively correlated with the tendency of mobile phone addiction, while the negative emotions were positively correlated with the tendency of mobile phone addiction, and the positive emotion was positively correlated with regulatory emotional self-efficacy;(4) the regulatory emotion self-efficacy had a partial mediating effect between the positive emotions and mobile phone addiction tendency and had no mediating effect between the negative emotions and mobile phone addiction tendency.
 
Statistics on the frequency of Student B leaving his seat and standing up
Article
The number of children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is increasing in China, whose inattention, disorganization, and impaired hyperactivity cause challenges for their study and teachers’ teaching activities in classroom. The study applied self-monitoring intervention for two children with ADHD learning in a primary school to improve their problem behaviors. We found self-monitoring intervention was likely to reduce their off-task behaviors, even for students with ADHD and ASD. Practical implication of the intervention is discussed in the paper.
 
Article
In a globalized and interconnected world, language skills are more important than ever, yet US students lag behind those in many countries, and foreign language enrollment has declined, especially at the elementary and postsecondary levels. In order to build language skills in the US, it is necessary not only to embrace interdisciplinary collaborations, but also partnerships with communities. However, in addition to developing sustainable interest in languages and cultures and sustainable motivation for language learning, it is also necessary to address the issues of accessibility and affordability. Accessibility issues include availability of both in-person and online programs, and affordability includes fees and tuition at all levels, including after-school and weekend programs, and summer camps. Online learning and community partnerships, along with increased funding, play a vital role in make language learning accessible and affordable for all interested students. A language advocacy partnership among all stakeholders can play a significant role in resolving accessibility and affordability issues and making language learning available to all.
 
Number of women and men in manufacturing between 2010-2016 Data Source: Kenya National Bureau of Statistics Figure 1 shows that women are clearly underrepresented in the manufacturing sector, a trend that is likely to be
Women and men above 15 in selected STEM fields Data Source: Kenya National Bureau of Statistics, 2019
KCSE University Qualifiers by Gender: 2018-2019
Article
Women have made significant progress in education through marked increase in enrolment. However, the same zeal has not been demonstrated in STEM based subjects and careers. The gender STEM scale still tips in favour of men in many countries across the world. This imbalance in the STEM fields owing to dominance by men is what creates the STEM Gap. In this paper, we synthesize literature and secondary data to show these disparities. We appreciate that STEM gap drivers are numerous and therefore zero in on what we consider the critical STEM gap drivers with respect to Kenya. We identify and succinctly discuss these critical drivers which are: self-concept and lack of resilience, teachers’ and parental expectations, role models and stereotyping, work environment and family obligations and finally weak scholastic performance. We also assess how this gender STEM gap is likely to affect the achievement of a number of Sustainable Development Goals (SGDs) and the Big Four Agenda and in the process, steer the country away from the path of industrialization envisaged in Vision 2030. We explain why it is important to mitigate the STEM gap and get more women in STEM. We recommend that, parents should deconstruct their own stereotypes; teachers should debunk the myth about STEM being the preserve of superior mental abilities that girls lack, students should acknowledge that STEM drives the economy and opens up employment opportunities, institutions should have a STEM endowment fund and industries should institute policies that enhance retention of women in STEM careers. It is expected that these if addressed should enhance women’s participation in STEM based subjects so that they can build careers in STEM.
 
Two Way ANOVA Results for Test Types and Proficiency Level
Two Way ANOVA Results between-Subjects Effects.
Multiple Comparison Results of Different Test types
MANOVA Results for Test Type and Collocational Categories
MANOVA Results for Proficiency level and Collocational Categories
Article
The current study tried to investigate the particular role of the text in EFL learners’ performance on three types of tests, i.e. cloze test, C-test and open-ended test. This study aimed at comparing three test types of cloze test, C-test and open-ended test in measuring collocational knowledge of Iranian EFL learners. This was a quantitative research. This type of research placed more emphases on collecting data in the form of numbers. To this end, 84 Persian EFL learners were selected. They were both male and female with intermediate and advanced proficiency groups. The results showed that advanced participants in all of these three tests performed much more efficiently compared to their intermediate peers and indicated more collocational competence. The findings of this study had some implications for language learners, EFL instructors and material developers.
 
Article
The role of students’ native language (L1) in the second language (L2) classrooms has been a debatable issue for a long time in the field of English Language teaching as a foreign language (EFL). The present study which took place in the United Arab Emirate (UAE), more specifically, at Umm Al-Quwain Educational Zone,(UAQ) aimed at investigating both students’ and teachers’ perceptions and attitudes towards the use of (L1) in the EFL classrooms. To achieve this, the researcher used both qualitative and quantitative research methods. Thus, it surveyed one hundred fifty (150) secondary students and fifty (50) teachers of English and observed three (3) EFL classes. The data were collected through two questionnaires and classroom observations. The classroom observations were intended to reflect the quantity of (L1) use in the (L2) classrooms. The data collected through the questionnaires were analyzed with the aid of frequency and percentage, those collected through the open-ended question of the questionnaires and the classroom observations were sorted and summarized.The findings obtained from classroom observations indicated that the respondents support the well-planned use of Arabic (L1) in certain situations in the EFL classrooms. The questionnaire results revealed that (72%) of the students and (54%) of the teachers felt that Arabic (L1) should be used in their EFL classrooms. The findings also showed that (71% ) of the students and (56%) of the teachers thought that cultural, religious, traditional and political concepts and ideas should be taught by referring to the students’ native language (L1).What is more, almost all the respondents objected to using the (L1) excessively and untimely in (EFL ) classes. The quantitative data on the percentage of (L1) in EFL classes showed that most of the respondents preferred only 10 % use of mother tongue (L1) in a 50- minute class. No teachers and students answered higher than 20% and 40% respectively. In view of these findings, teachers as well as text writers and curricula planners and designers should take the learners’ native language (L1) as a teaching / learning tool.
 
Article
School programs are frequently too demanding, so there is a good chance of school failure and chronic fatigue. The study was carried out on a group of 211 students from two high schools in the city of Suceava. A questionnaire was used that attempted to quantify school fatigue, passive and active leisure time, and social relationships. Fatigue occurs as a result of exceeding the body's exercise capacity. The situation is difficult for teenagers who have to adapt to school demands but who are also vulnerable to excessive levels of effort. Passive rest is done through night and daytime sleep. Numerous daily activities are commonly associated with reduced hours of sleep. There are situations where relaxing activities such as watching television programs and using the computer can become tiring. A long time spent on the computer can be associated with restricting social relationships, a phenomenon that must be evaluated more closely. Such studies are essential for maintaining student wellbeing and for ensuring proper school performance.
 
Article
Assessment results can be a guide to instruction, and they can ensure that the prescribed curriculum is well covered. When assessment data are used as a means of making appropriate instructional adjustments for improvement, teaching and learning progresses. The study examined basic school teachers’ perception and use of assessment data. Cross-sectional survey design was used for the conduct of the study. Hundred and fifty (150) teachers within the Central region of Ghana were sampled from twenty (20) basic schools using systematic sampling procedure. A two-dimensional questionnaire was adapted, validated and used for the collection of research data. The data to provide answers to the study question were analysed using descriptive statistics, specifically, percentages and frequencies. The hypothesis was tested using Partial Least Square structural equation modelling approach. Findings revealed that in practice, basic school teachers use assessment data to plan instruction, evaluate students’ learning progress, determine curriculum strands to emphasize during teaching sessions and also to evaluate instructional effectiveness for the academic year. The study further showed that teacher perception about assessment significantly predict assessment data use. The study recommends that, tertiary institutions that train teachers must continue to place much emphasis on the teaching of ‘assessment in schools’ to deepen prospective teachers’ knowledge and utilization of assessment data for sustenance of positive ‘assessment data use practices’ in Ghana basic schools.
 
Article
Learner-centered teaching (LCT) has one main focus – learners and learning! With learner-centered teaching, the traditional roles of the instructor and learners change. In this paper, we draw various parallels between learner-centered instruction and ancient Chinese wisdom based on Daoist perspectives to further promote and support learner-centered teaching among instructors, in particular college instructors. Daoist wisdom is a philosophy based on living in peace and harmony with the way everything is in nature, and it encourages sharing of power with students, which ultimately engenders trust. This paper will present and discuss the key characteristics of learner-centered instruction alongside ancient Daoist perspectives that align with and promote and support this type of instruction. These learner-centered characteristics include 1) the instructor as a facilitator of learning, 2) sharing of power and control with learners, 3) student participation and responsibility for learning, 4) collaboration among learners, 5) higher-order skills instruction and development, and 6) evaluation for learning purposes. This paper is organized based on these interrelated and interdependent characteristics of LCT and their relationship to ancient Daoist perspectives, which can support instructors in applying learner-centered instructional methods.
 
Study 1: Descriptive Statistics for Categorical Variables
Study 2: Descriptive Statistics for Categorical Variables
Article
In two studies, 254 secondary teachers completed a survey assessing beliefs about three putative factors of “authoritative teaching,” response, demand, and control. Control was positively associated with response, suggesting that teachers viewed development of relationships with students as congruent with classroom discipline. But demand was not associated with response, suggesting beliefs holding that academic rigor does not necessarily undermine relationships. Teachers apparently view authoritative teaching as combining response and control, not response and demand. Beliefs as such provide a window on classroom practices and provide a starting point for teacher educators who aim to facilitate optimal interactional styles in schools.
 
Article
With the further development of “the reform and open”, and the strategically stable advancement of “going out”, there is increasingly demand for foreign language talents and foreign language education. Research-based College English Blended Teaching just adapts to the national demand for international fashion talents with the international vision and the ability to participate in the international competition, which also provides us with opportunity to integrate the information technology with subject teaching. With the A-level class of grade 2018 from Beijing Institute of Fashion Technology (BIFT) as the case, the blended teaching theory as the guidance, this research presents the way of practice in research-based college English blended teaching by making use of the instrumental features of college English with the aim of cultivating students' professional research ability and academic communication ability. The study shows that remarkable results have been achieved in research-based blended teaching after three-semester practice-students could independently deliver academic presentation and conduct research in English individually or collaboratively in the professional field. The practice and exploration of the efficiency in research-based College English blended teaching could enhance the ability of academic presentation and academic writing of fashion majors, and promote their academic achievements for high-quality international fashion talents. Therefore, research-based College English blended teaching, integrating English skills with professional knowledge, is proved to be definitely instructive, implicational and exemplary to reform college English teaching in fashion field.
 
Correlations, Means, and Standard Deviations for Belongingness, College Self-Efficacy, and Exercise Motivation
Article
This study examined the role of college self-efficacy in the relationship between university belongingness and exercise motivation among a group of college students (N = 311). Multiple social factors have been identified as playing an important role in students’ physical health and wellness (Leslie et al., 1999; Wallace et al., 2000); however, the mechanisms by which university belongingness influences various exercise motives are unexplored. In the current study, college self-efficacy was examined as a mediator between university belongingness and six types of exercise motivation: stress management, appearance, enjoyment, revitalization, weight management, and positive health (Markland & Ingledew, 1997). Results showed that college self-efficacy mediated the relationship between belongingness and exercise motivation for stress management, enjoyment, revitalization, and positive health. These findings highlight how college self-efficacy helps explain the relationship between university belongingness and motivation to exercise, providing insight into prevention research and implications for university personnel to help foster greater health promotion on campus.
 
Dimensionality Assessment of 2017 NECO Mathematics dichotomously scored items in Nigeria under STEU
Total Variance Explained
Set of DIF Items that Tentatively Showed the Nature of Bias Encountered Statistically Based on Sex
Set of DIF Items that tentatively showed the Nature of Bias encountered statistically based on School Location
1.2.3. Set of DIF Items that tentatively showed the Nature of Bias encountered statistically Based on School Type
Article
This study examined the nature of item bias on students’ performance in 2017 National Examinations Council (NECO) mathematics senior school certificate dichotomously scored items in Nigeria. The study adopted an ex-post-facto research design. A sample of 256,039 candidates was randomly selected from the population of 1,034,629 students who took the test. Instrument for data collection was 'Student Results' (SR). Data collected were analysed using the R language environment and an independent t-test. Results showed that the 2017 NECO Mathematics test was essentially unidimensional (-0.28 (<.20), ASSI = -0.31 (< 0.25) and RATIO = -0.31 (< 0.36). Results also showed that the nature of bias statistically encountered was a mean difference in scores bias, indicating that 86% (52 items), 79.1% (34 items), and 96% (56 items) were biased against male students, urban and public-school students, respectively. It was concluded that item bias is a notable factor that affected the validity of the NECO 2017 Mathematics test and conclusions drawn from the scores in Nigeria. Hence, it was recommended that before tests are administered for public use, examination bodies should make a careful review of tests through dimensionality assessment at the developmental stage to eliminate any perspectives that could cause test inequity among examinees.
 
Article
Plant biology, as a significant compulsory course for biological science students, is intuitive and practical, which plays a unique role in improving students' comprehensive quality and cultivating their innovation ability. Because of its strong practical characteristics, the experimental course is of great necessity in the study of this course. This paper analyzes the traditional teaching mode of plant biology experiment, as well as its shortcomings in modern teaching, and puts forward diversified reform methods based on the development of contemporary plant biology to promote the teaching mode of plant biology experiment to meet the needs of contemporary students on this subject. Based on the rapid development of modern science and technology, this paper includes the teaching contents, teaching methods, and assessment system of plant biology experiments, and discusses them respectively. This paper aims to improve the teaching efficiency of modern plant biology experiments and help to achieve the goal of efficiently improving students' innovation and scientific research ability.
 
Article
The practice of Blended learning in schooling for almost two decades has shown limited variations from what conventional education had breached hundreds of years ago. In that, continuing the use of large groups teaching, big chunks of required curriculum for learning and instruction, unified mandatory knowledge for all students, the lack of individual achievement pace, unified daily study schedules, and same backward assessment tools and formalities. Yet, ICTs exert every moment profound remote digital penetrating power into the deep privacy of human anatomy, actions, family and daily lives in what could be called the “Age of digital Information Nudity”. Moreover, resource teachers or students’ counselors are able by a click at a digital curriculum to reveal where learners’ locations are, how many times attempted reading, performing assignments, or what study difficulties they are facing. ICTs have dismantled all the psychological, social, educational and physical boundaries separating peoples, businesses and schooling communities. Students living currently in digital environments have a free will through digital means to decide, plan, in addition, to using types, tools, times and settings for their blended and online learnings, even without the pre-consent of school authorities. Hence, a new form of blended education deems crucial, that is “neoBlend-Digit” Schooling. This new hybrid methodology, when well served by developmental appropriate curriculum design, thoughtful treatment of curriculum content, a systemic implementation framework (diagnostic, formative and summative), and optional multi learning tracks, will lead to open ended learning free of failure, outdated teachers and school personnel, and environmental limitations. Consequently civic citizen students are graduating as literates, professional specialists, and academic pioneers.. Realizing as such what the American educator, William Glasser* wished for “Schools without Failure”. In current work however, the long waited dream of Glasser is presented in a concise digital language and concretely accountable educational evidences in field reality.
 
Article
Recruitment, admission and retention of diverse nursing students are needed to ensure success, positively impact healthcare outcomes and relieve the nursing shortage. To ensure success in accelerated nursing programs, minority students need a variety of financial and academic support services. Nursing students are faced with multiple challenges, compiled with social determinants of health. Conditions arise that interfere with the person's ability to be successful beyond the personal, familial, academic, and social environments. Schools of nursing have the obligation and opportunity to provide competent nurses to care for the community. The challenge for nursing students on the border during a pandemic came in the offering of clinical encounters. Multiple opportunities were discovered and implemented for students during the pandemic including town hall meetings and “in progress” enrollment. A new approach in the delivery of course content and clinical experiences were developed. Recognizing and highlighting student needs during the current healthcare environment led to innovative ways in addressing the challenges nursing students faced during a pandemic on the border of the Southwest United States.
 
Article
Better academic performance is associated with adjustment in the educational institution. Newly enrolled students at undergraduate programs face some adjustment related problems (i. e. – loneliness etc.) in the new environment. The present study was aimed to explore the mediating role of Facebook timeline browsing and chatting with friends on Facebook in the relationship between loneliness and mental health among first-year undergraduate students. The study sample comprised of 180 first-year students who were selected purposively from the University of Chittagong. Results suggested significant gender differences in feelings of loneliness, chatting on Facebook, Facebook timeline browsing. Results explored the mediating role of timeline browsing in the relationship between loneliness and mental health, and this relation also moderated by gender. Loneliness, timeline browsing, and gender explained 50% variance of the mental health.
 
Article
This article outlines their impact on China's technological innovation capabilities from nine aspects including primary and secondary education to university education, the shortcomings of scientific research evaluation system, the forward-looking of educational investment and the rationality of research funding, the negative feedback of the employment market on innovative research, intellectual property protection and incentive mechanism, The basic social system and its incentive mechanism combined with learning and research, the incentive mechanism and cultural atmosphere of enterprises and administrative institutions, and the origin of China's modern education model. The comprehensive analysis shows that changing the status quo of China's lack of innovation is a systematic project. A single ministry cannot complete many specific measures of reform, and must have a national-level top-level design. Through reform, the education and scientific research system has reasonable design and strong self-repairing ability. It is the need of innovation to promote industrial upgrading. Its effectiveness directly determines whether China can cross the middle income trap and the great rejuvenation of the Chinese nation.
 
Article
Research indicates that retention and performance of undergraduate students increases when they perceive a cooperative and supportive educational community. The course syllabus is one of the first opportunities to influence student perception on their educational experience. Literature on syllabi suggests that learner-centered syllabi yield more positive student perceptions of teachers and the course as compared to traditional teacher-centered syllabi. Current research on the impacts of different syllabi constructs within construction education is lacking, and no studies could be found on whether these perceptions translate to student grades. This study used action research to better understand the impact of a learner-centered syllabus vs. a teacher-centered syllabus in an undergraduate construction management program. Student perception, faculty perception and student grades were measured between the learner-centered class and the teacher-centered class. The data was collected from four different classes, split among two courses, and taught by two faculty over the spring 2020 semester. Results suggested that the learner-centered syllabi appeared to motivate student engagement as well as impact both, the first impressions of the instructor and teacher-student relationship. However, it showed no difference in student grades.
 
Article
The recent COVID-19 pandemic has brought the supply chain to the attention of everyone. In order to make supply chains work effectively and efficiently, a number of automated supply chain management systems are needed. This paper looks at the need to conduct curriculum reviews in order to ensure that the students in supply chain programs are not being harmed by the lack of exposure to the various systems needed in the supply chain. The analysis looks at the systems required for an Enterprise Certification compared to the systems reflected in a sample of supply chain management syllabi. The conclusions include the need to conduct curriculum reviews on a regular basis to ensure the best possible education of the students. This recommendation is critical for all education systems and not just supply chain management systems courses.
 
Article
Parent cooperative preschools are unique educational enterprises because they involve the participation of parents and children. The purpose of this historical qualitative analysis examines the history of parent cooperative preschools and the contributions of this type of early childhood setting, including parent engagement in the classroom, family strengths (both personal and in the community), and the teacher’s role in the classroom as a facilitator, leader, and parent educator. Reflections from past parent cooperative board members of a parent cooperative are included sharing their personal contributions, joys, collaborations, and challenges of engagement in this type of early childhood program. The reflections from the parent cooperative board members share insight into the role they played in the awareness of early childhood education to society, family engagement, advocacy, and the critical importance of this type of early childhood setting for all young children. Parent cooperative preschools encourages families to engage in reciprocal relationships with teachers by offering learning activities for the home and in the community. They are associated with important values and virtues for families to grow and learn with their child.
 
Article
Inclusive early childhood settings invite children with and without disabilities to play, learn, and work together in one classroom. Teachers can take advantage of children’s curiosity for math when they organize creative learning environments and develop meaningful critical thinking experiences to increase children’s interactions with peers. Peer-shared activities, including math helpmates and math chats, can offer a hopeful approach for supporting higher order and critical thinking math experiences for young children in inclusive classroom settings. Inviting a math helpmate to explain to a peer how or why they arrived at an answer or to show a different way to find an answer during math activities can promote critical math thinking and communication skills. To maximize success when using peer-shared strategies, teachers should be actively involved in monitoring math progress, providing feedback to children, and supporting peer interactions. This article will explore a variety of strategies for creating math discoveries and critical thinking using peer-shared activities at school and home. Practical strategies to be discussed will include math helpmates, math chats, and incidental teaching for increasing for supporting children’s natural interest in math concepts.
 
Article
The purpose of this article is to present issues for research consideration related to cross-cultural teaching challenges as an American in China. This article describes my pedagogical practices and insight after five years of teaching business ethics, management and leadership primarily to Chinese undergraduate students in Henan Province, Central China. The issues raised and the suggestions for future research explored herein will hopefully lead to greater understanding and pedagogical success for American teachers working in China. In addition, cross-cultural educators may gain at least one critical tool or insight to increase their teaching efficacy as all educators are teaching cross-culturally with the presence of ethnic groups and international students in classrooms. At a minimum, this discussion may shorten the learning curve a bit for those recent to the profession who find themselves in an unfamiliar cultural environment and who strive to adapt their pedagogy for improved classroom experiences and student-centered course outcomes.
 
Top-cited authors
Laura Sokal
  • The University of Winnipeg
Lesley Eblie Trudel
  • The University of Winnipeg
Jeff Babb
  • The University of Winnipeg
Muna Mohammad
  • Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia
Francisco Javier García-Prieto
  • Universidad de Huelva