IEEE Internet Computing

Published by Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers
Online ISSN: 1089-7801
Publications
Article
AppScale is an open source distributed software system that implements a cloud platform as a service (PaaS). AppScale makes cloud applications easy to deploy and scale over disparate cloud fabrics, implementing a set of APIs and architecture that also makes apps portable across the services they employ. AppScale is API-compatible with Google App Engine (GAE) and thus executes GAE applications on-premise or over other cloud infrastructures, without modification.
 
Article
In a previous paper, the author described where he thought the Web would be headed over the next few years. He speculated that the trend seemed to be toward the semantic Web, although maybe not via the shortest path of directly deploying semantic Web technologies such as RDF and OWL. For this paper, he presents some concrete examples of technologies that support this prognosis. One key idea of the semantic Web is the Web of data, in which richly interconnected data collections appear alongside (and integrated with) the collections of hypertext documents. However, the Web supports linking, and with the various data languages available (often XML based), a Web of data without semantic Web technologies is entirely conceivable. In a sense, we already have such a thing, although the data are usually binary files such as images and audio files, which seriously limits linking potential. Without the ability to join pieces of information and work more on the level of knowledge representation, this naive Web of data offers little promise in itself. There is a possible shift under way, however, from the Web as (mostly) a document repository with generally limited granularity of addressability, to the Web as a generic, moderately interlinked data store (which includes documents as a subset of data types)
 
Article
The chair of the Gigabit Ethernet task force and chief technical editor of the standard (IEEE 802.3z) summarize changes in the data-link and physical network layers of the newest standard in the world's most widely deployed LAN technology. The changes include two to the Ethernet's essential Carrier Sense Multiple Access with Collision Detection (CSMA/CD) protocol to better support its use in enterprise backbones, as it scales up two orders of magnitude-to 1,000 Mbps, while maintaining compatibility with the installed base of 10 and 100 Mbps Ethernet systems. The authors also introduce the draft standard for the 1000Base-T supplement to Gigabit Ethernet, which will open up the possibility of gigabit communication over ordinary building wires.
 
Article
The prevalence of XML in discussions of the Web and its application to such diverse application domains in the past year (1998-99) have almost eclipsed the fact that the 1.0 specification, approved as a W3C Recommendation in February 1998, is only the first part of the “structured documents” originally envisioned. The specifications for two more parts-hypertext link types and the stylesheet language-are nearing completion, and the W3C chartered new working groups last year (1998) to generate new members of the family
 
Article
A key aspect of the service-oriented architecture approach for middleware is that services advertise themselves using directory or lookup services so that prospective clients can find them. The service location and discovery abstractions required to support this are not much different from those we use to conduct business with other people. As a result, we can gain insights into how distributed service discovery systems work by comparing them to everyday human-oriented service discovery approaches. Given that service discovery depends on discovery services, how does an application actually find a discovery service?.
 
Article
Service-oriented computing and cloud computing have a reciprocal relationship - one provides computing of services and the other provides services of computing. Although service-oriented computing in cloud computing environments presents a new set of research challenges, the authors believe the combination also provides potentially transformative opportunities.
 
Article
Twitter feeds range from truly useful to banal and currently represent one of the fastest growing social networking technologies. EIC Fred Douglis looks at whether Twitter's success will continue, or whether it will ultimately be overtaken by a better, more selective technology.
 
An example aAQUA portal interaction. (a) The question, in Marathi, asks how to deal with Bherud disease, which is drying up a mango tree that's only 20 years old. (b) The expert's response. The green box shows the expert's affiliation (KVK Baramati). The expert advises the farmer to make a hole in the tree and insert an iron rod into it. The insects within the tree will crawl into the rod; the farmer can then remove it and pour a petrol and dichloovus solution into the hole, then cover it with mud.
Figure A. Refining a search. The expert searches by crop ("tomato"), then refines the search further by diseases in response to a user's question.
Article
As in many regions of the world, people in rural India often lack access to knowledge that's more readily available to people in urban areas. Although rural telecenters are becoming more common, developing content that's presented in local languages, relevant to users, and delivered in an immediately usable form is a challenge here and in rural areas across the globe. To address this, an agricultural portal for rural farmers in India uses innovative database systems and information retrieval techniques. In so doing, it both improves service and addresses connection costs and constraints.
 
The Fiets Amsterdam Tour SMIL presentation. (a) Display of Fiets greeting section, set for Dutch captions, on GRiNS Player for SMIL 2.0. (b) Display of Fiets thumbnail section, on RealPlayer1.
Figure A. GRiNS editor view of Fiets Amsterdam Tour. In addition to facilitating presentation editing, GRiNS helps developers manage large-scale SMIL-defined multimedia.
Article
On 7 August 2001, the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) released version 2.0 of Synchronized Multimedia Integration Language, or SMIL. Three years ago, SMIL 1.0 introduced a basic foundation for Web multimedia and it quickly gained widespread use. With a specification document about 15 times as large as version 1.0, SMIL 2.0 builds on this foundation and marks an enormous step forward in multimedia functionality. Although Web multimedia has long been obtainable with proprietary formats or Java programs, it's been largely inaccessible to most Web authors and isolated from the Web's technical framework. SMIL's HTML-like syntax aims to do for multimedia what HTML did for hypertext: bring it into every living room, with an easy-to-author descriptive format that works with readily available cross-platform players. SMIL lets authors create simple multimedia simply and add, more complex behavior incrementally. But SMIL isn't just HTML-like, it's XML, which makes it part of the W3C's family of XML-related standards including scalable vector graphics (SVG), cascading style sheets (CSS), XPointer, XSLT, namespaces, and XHTML. SMIL's features fall into five categories: media content, layout, timing, linking, and adaptivity. The latter brings altogether new features to the Web, letting authors adapt content to different market groups, user abilities, system configurations, and runtime system delays. The article covers each feature category and its basic constructs using a simple SMIL presentation built with the SMIL 2.0 Language Profile, which is the flagship SMIL-defined language for multimedia browsers
 
Article
Recommender systems help users cope with information overload by using their preferences to recommend items. To date, most recommenders have employed users' ratings, information about the user's profile, or metadata describing the items. To take advantage of Web 2.0 applications, the authors propose using information obtained from social tagging to improve the recommendations. The Web 2.0 TV program recommender queveo.tv currently combines content-based and collaborative filtering techniques. This article presents a novel tag-based recommender to enhance the recommending engine by improving the coverage and diversity of the suggestions.
 
Article
Sometimes it seems that the whole field of IP-based network technology is moving at a pace that will out-distance even its most ardent and enthusiastic followers. Trying to keep up with all the new ideas, acronyms, vendor announcements, IETF happenings and conferences can create strong feelings of inadequacy. At times, buried under piles of industry literature and staring at hundreds of unread e-mails, I ask myself, “How did the simple process of forwarding an IP packet from one device to another become so complicated?” Before embarking on an earnest attempt to answer that question, I first step back and reflect on where this field has been and what has been accomplished. From there, we can look at where it might be going
 
Article
In this article, I offer a vision of the Internet in the coming decade (2000-2010) from a ground-level perspective. Looking ahead, I've recently begun to see that for many of us, technology is subsiding as the obstacle. There's never a question any more of whether we “can” do something technically. Today's available toolbox allows for robust, production-grade systems-provided you have the right people to build and maintain them; which is exactly the issue: the largest bottleneck is no longer technology, but people
 
Article
Over the past 18 months, the Computer Society's Internet Best Practices working group has been developing a standard that focuses on designing Web pages for use on managed networks. The working group chair summarizes the scope of this work, including an example recommendation for dating Web pages
 
Article
Imagine a common scene: a small group of people from different organizations meets and decides to engage in a cooperative project. These might be people working on a business deal, people sharing technical information, or a social group planning a future function. They decide to use the Internet to facilitate their interaction. What technology are they likely to use? E-mail is certainly available, but there is currently little else. The only other widely used collaboration technologies are AIM (AOL's Instant Messenger service) and ICQ, which are quite useful but primarily for short interactions. They provide no tools for recording the interaction or connecting the communication with the users' other files. Fortunately, coming developments will trigger dramatic changes in collaboration technology and systems. As 1999 ends, the author sees five technical developments that are laying the foundation for a radically different future for Internet based collaboration: security; bandwidth; voice and IP convergence; appliances and handheld devices; and wireless connections. Group interactions will take many forms. Within the next decade, the author expects to see widespread sharing of documents, sharing of real-time drawings on whiteboards, voice conferencing, and perhaps videoconferencing
 
Article
With the Resource Description Framework (RDF) and Web Ontology Language (OWL) - the languages that power the semantic Web - becoming standards and new technologies reaching maturity for embedding semantics in existing Web pages and querying RDF knowledge stores, something exciting is clearly happening in this area. Whereas the research community is widely exploiting the AI technologies that motivate, in particular, the OWL DL sublanguage, the languages' more "Webby" features - sometimes referred to as the "dark side" of the semantic Web - are powering the Web 3.0 technology space
 
H.323 Gateway Services
The translation of H.323 call into XGSP procedure This join session procedure has three important steps: H.225 call setup, H.245 capability exchange and audiovisual logical channel creation. (1)H.225 Call Setup A H.323 terminal sends H.225 setup message with the signaling destination address that represents SESSION ID for this meeting. H.323 gateway parses the H.225 setup message, and sends " JoinAVSession " with the SESSION ID. This " Join-AV-Session " informs the XGSP AV Session Server that a H.323 terminal wants to join the session. XGSP AV Session Server determines whether the request of the H.323 terminal can be allowed and fill the information of audiovisual RTPLinks of the broker in the " Join-AV- Session-OK " message. If the H.323 gateway gets the " OK " response, it sends H.225 CONNECT to complete the H.225 procedure. And it keeps the RTP channel information < IP Address, port > for the phase of OpenLogicChannel. (2)H.245 Capability Exchange Each H.323 terminal has its H.245 media capability description. The establishment of a H.323 conference involves the procedure of common media capability negotiation, which requires the MC to send a capability set to the endpoints in the conference. We use SDPng [10] for the capability description of Global-MMCS media services, which can be mapped into H.245 media capability description. SDPng uses XML to describe the session media information and is quite appropriate for the capability exchange between XGSP AV Session Server and H.323 terminals.  
Distributed H.323 Gateways for different administration zones  
Article
The Global Multimedia Collaboration System is designed to bridge H.323, Session Initiation Protocol, Access Grid clients, and 2.SG/3G cellular phones in audio-visual collaborations. One of its key components is the H.323 gateway, which lets H.323 terminals interact with other clients, providing complete conferencing control services. This system is designed to help scientists and students who have access only to H.323 and SIP endpoints or cellular phones with scientific collaboration in the high-end Access Grid environment.
 
Article
A natural language interface system for an Internet search engine shows substantial increases in the precision of query results and the percentage of queries answered correctly. The system expands queries based on a word-sense-disambiguation method and postprocesses retrieved documents to extract only the parts relevant to a query
 
Web.alive rendering of a copper smelter. The 3D environment displays an accurate model of the anode vessel, showing the smelter and converter furnaces, including the design of the vessel's refractory lining.
Interior of a copper anode vessel, rendered in Web.alive. This interior consists of thick reinforced tuyere areas, the access door, the porous plug placement, the skimming mouth, and the slag line refractory.
Article
This article highlights the need for accurate modeling in some virtual world applications, especially in engineering, manufacturing, and certain military applications. For example, virtual worlds can enable teams of engineers, managers, and customers to collaboratively view a copper smelter during design and deployment. This article specifically looks at how a virtual world can help in the design and maintenance of a copper smelter model and its refractory lining for copper production.
 
Article
Virtual worlds have become very popular in recent years, with trends toward larger worlds and more user-generated content. The growth of 3D content in virtual worlds will make real-time content streaming (or 3D streaming) increasingly attractive for developers. To meet the demands of a large user base while lowering costs, peer-to-peer (P2P) content delivery holds the promise for a paradigm shift in how future virtual worlds will be deployed and used. The authors define both the problem and solution spaces for P2P 3D streaming - by outlining its requirements and challenges - and categorize existing proposals.
 
Interface of the SharedWeb browser.
The SharedWeb browser after a user logs into the virtual world. Note when the URL button emerges, a user can forward a Web resource to other players.
In the Virtual Office, pictures on the wall hyperlink to various HTML forms. The user has downloaded an application form for a student ID and filled it in.
Article
The Virtual Realty Modeling Language sets an open-standard file format for designing 3D multimedia and shared virtual worlds on the Internet. VRML was originally designed to support the interaction of multiple participants in the World Wide Web environment, that is, to network virtual worlds via hyperlinks. The development of VRML has spurred broad research on distributed multiuser VR systems. We describe SharedWeb, a 3D Web browsing system that was designed and implemented to support interaction among clients in the existing Web environment. We begin by describing the methodologies and mechanisms used to achieve seamless integration with the Web environment, then we summarize the SharedWeb system implementation. We present some experimental results that show the effects of different frame rates and threshold values on system performance, and conclude with discussions of two virtual worlds currently supported by the system
 
Article
Researchers at the Tsinghua University in Beijing propose a mechanism for letting IPv4 networks communicate with each other across an IPv6 backbone via a Border- Gateway Protocol (BGP)-based control plane for advertising tunnels and lPv4 network prefixes. They've deployed a prototype implementation on the native lPv6 China Education and Research Network 2 (CERNet2) backbone as the major part of the China Next-Generation Internet (CNGI) project, using current packet-encapsulation technology and an extension of BGP, and the IETF is currently considering their 4over6 mechanism as well.
 
Article
We adapted the standard X.509 privilege management infrastructure to build an efficient role-based trust management system in which role assignments can be widely distributed among organizations, and an XML-based local policy determines which roles to trust and which privileges to grant. A simple Java API lets target applications easily incorporate the system. The Permis API has already proven its general utility in four very different applications throughout Europe.
 
Article
Mobile ad hoc wireless networks will extend the Internet into new territory, making Web services available "anytime, anywhere." This creates new markets in such areas as pervasive computing and traffic management. We show that the communication quality of current 802.11 ad hoc networks is low, and that users can experience strong fluctuations in link quality as a result. They identify key factors that cause these fluctuations and derive implications for application development. In particular, applications must tolerate frequent disconnections, network partitioning, and latency variations that are far more severe than in conventional networks.
 
Article
Wireless networking applications continue to proliferate at an incredible pace as wireless features, functions, security, and throughput improve. 802.11 is the standard on which wireless networking exists today, and products that employ the technology support a broad range of uses for enterprises and home users. With such explosive growth in infrastructure and applications, understanding some basics about the technology, and its limitations, can be very helpful amid claims from competing vendors about what 802.11 can do and what the future has in store. The author explores the current environment of 802.11 wireless networking technologies and where the dialog in the standards bodies appears to be leading the industry. The primary focus is 802.11b
 
Article
802.11a represents the third generation of wireless networking standards and technology (behind 802.11 and .11b). It was actually approved as a standard earlier than 802.11b, but it presented a greater engineering challenge, and was delayed. Advances in technology (Moore's Law continues to prove true) helped Internet engineers overcome those challenges in a cost-effective manner and prepare the specification for market introduction. The result is the further extension of 802.11 networking capabilities. My previous article, "802.11: Leaving the Wire Behind," (Kapp, 2002) focused on 802.11b wireless networking and the various 802.11 task groups that will directly affect the future of 802.11 networking. In this article, I examine 802.11a networking in depth and compare it to 802.11b and the upcoming 802.11g networking.
 
TCP throughput for IPv4 and IPv6 over Windows XP, Windows 7 and Fedora 12.  
UDP throughput for IPv4 and IPv6 over Windows XP, Windows 7 and Fedora 12.  
TCP RTT for IPv4 and IPv6 over Windows XP, Windows 7 and Fedora 12.  
UDP RTT for IPv4 and IPv6 over Windows XP, Windows 7 and Fedora 12.  
CPU Utlilization for IPv6 and IPv4 on Windows XP, Windows 7 and Fedora 12.  
Article
IPv6 is built into the latest versions of Microsoft Windows and Linux-based operating systems. It's expected to replace the current IPv4 and solve its numerous problems, such as address exhaustion, security, and mobility. However, implementing IPv6 will have drawbacks, such as lower bandwidth, so it's important to determine which modern operating systems will give the best bandwidth performance over IPv6 networks.
 
Article
Internet service providers (ISPs) offering dial-up access and purveyors of enterprise networks supporting telecommuters face some difficult challenges. Ever-increasing residential dialup subscribers demand available modem (or ISDN) ports, or threaten to take their business elsewhere. To meet this demand, ISPs (dial providers) are deploying a large number of-complex, port-dense network access servers (NAS) to handle thousands of individual dial-up connections. At the same time, the miniaturization of stationary office essentials, such as the laptop computer and cellular telephone, has coupled with the need for maximum customer face time to create a workforce in perpetual motion. These “road warriors” require secure and reliable access to email and Web resources from hotels, airports, and virtual offices around the world. But dial providers must do more than simply offer an available modem port at the other end of a telephone call. They must protect against theft-of-service attacks by unscrupulous individuals with excess free time; they must verify subscribers' levels of access authorization; and for cost recovery, billing, and resource planning purposes, they may need to meter the connection time to the network. Furthermore, to provide maximum coverage to a growing roaming and mobile subscriber base, they may choose to pool their NAS resources while retaining control over their subscribers' access, usage, and billing information. All these services require coordination between the various administrative systems supported by the dial providers in partnership with each other
 
Article
This paper describe some of what the developers of generalized Web systems have to deal with, assuming they take the specifications at face value. The author believe that the developer community is generally overloaded with what they see, leading to workarounds and simplifications that encourage the development of systems that are inconsistent with underlying specifications. Although there's been an upsurge in the development of specification-friendly "restful" systems (that is, those that treat HTTP as an interface rather than just a transport), barriers still exist to taking the Web further into a generalized Web of data and developing significantly more useful services.
 
Article
As a middle-tier, server-side caching engine, the dynamic content accelerator reduces dynamic page-generation processing delays by caching fragments of dynamically generated Web pages. This fragment-level solution, combined with intelligent cache management strategies, can significantly reduce the processing load on the Web application server, letting it handle higher user loads and thus significantly outperforming existing middle-tier caching solutions.
 
Article
Many businesses today save time and money, and increase their agility, by outsourcing mundane IT tasks to cloud providers. The author argues that similar methods can be used to overcome the complexities inherent in increas ingly data-intensive, computational, and collaborative scientific research. He describes Globus Online, a system that he and his colleagues are developing to realize this vision.
 
Article
Web acceleration technologies and the compression algorithm that can be used as a standard in the academic compression theories are discussed. The new v.92 modem which uses a v.44 compression algorithm and is much faster than earlier versions is also discussed. The competition between Propel and SlipStream Data and their various products are also presented. It is found that real future of these accelerators is providing enterprize customers with lower bandwidth costs across a wide range of devices, including wireless local networks such as 802.11 networks and handheld devices.
 
Communications using application protocol data units. The interactions between a host program, card reader, and smart card use APDU command set and responses.
Socket approach. The proxy residing on the host acts as a gateway between the smart card applet service and the Internet.
Article
The OrbCard framework uses Corba wrapper technology to extend smart card services to a distributed computing environment
 
Article
Promising to deliver broadband Internet access over the same lines that deliver electricity sounds almost too good to be true - fast network access available to business and residential users anywhere in the electricity - equipped world. North American broadband-over-power-line (BPL) and European power-line-communications (PLC) proponents claim the technology appears to provide the long-awaited "third wire" to compete with telephone companies' DSL technology and television cable Internet access, or to provide a future conduit where none currently exists. However, not everyone following the gradual BPL-rollout service is a fan. The American Radio Relay League, the national organization representing amateur radio operators in the US, is fiercely opposed to allowing BPL deployments without strict rules restricting the BPL equipment's radio frequencies and power output limits, citing interference fears Moreover, an ARRL spokesperson says that a "pure" BPL approach is not the answer to delivering broadband to rural areas, and that BPL proponents are hawking a solution that shows itself to be a mere shadow of their claims.
 
Article
The proliferation of mobile devices in wireless environments has put special requirements on the ability to access the Web seamlessly. To address the impact of varying contextual characteristics on mobile access, the authors developed the WebPADS framework, which can actively deploy new mobile services. Moreover, WebPADS can dynamically reconfigure its services and migrate them to adapt to the vigorous changes in the wireless environment.
 
Article
Distributed active archive centers (DAACs) process raw data and transform them into higher-level data products, making them available to scientists from various disciplines and to the public. The data's sheer volume and richness illustrates the scalability challenges such as projects face. A simple analytic model is used to analyze the scalability of an infrastructure that generates high-level data products derived from raw data and then delivers them in response to user requests. The concept of metadata is discussed and shown how it generally facilitates access to scientific data.
 
Article
The Internet is about access-on the simplest level, access to data, to information and to knowledge; on a more complex level, access to the processing of knowledge; and on the most complex level, access to individuals, to organizations and to government. This article thus describes the architecture of information access
 
Article
As the Internet evolves, the gap widens between information “haves” and “havenots”, between highly developed nations and those where it is said that two billion people are yet to make their first telephone call. Not surprisingly, in underdeveloped nations where a telephone is rare, access to the Internet is even rarer. As technologists, what can we do to ameliorate this problem? At the practical level, we can't do much for the throngs of illiterate older folks who have barely enough food to eat in those underdeveloped countries. But, if we handle it right, there may be much that the Internet can do for their children. In the longer term, providing their children with Internet access may also benefit our children. The wars of today are primarily among the poorest countries of the world, and small country wars have a historical propensity to act as tinder to ignite larger conflagrations. The author believes that technologists can offer access to the world's information to all the bright kids around the world and accelerate the process of global educational equalization
 
Requirements for simplified policy administration. 
Article
Simplifying the administration of location-based access-control policies requires a mechanism that supports both intuitive and scalable spatial constraint specifications and a flexible enforcement architecture. Policy mapper is an administrative tool that helps define access control at conceptual and logical levels to carry out constraint specification and enforcement. The tool also provides an interface definition language that couples the two levels. Policy mapper bridges a critical gap between the expressiveness and enforcement of spatial constraints in location-based access-control policies.
 
Article
Access control techniques for XML provide a simple way to protect confidential information at the same granularity level provided by XML schemas. In this article, we describe our approach to these problems and the design guidelines that led to our current implementation of an access control system for XML information
 
Article
The booming popularity of municipal wireless networks has amplified an ongoing debate. While supporters claim that municipal wireless networks are a vital solution to many locations' last-mile broadband problems, providers depending on broadband revenue to make up for declining income see these networks as a threat. In light of the debate, the suggestion is to make all options for broadband infrastructure open. That way, public and private sectors and commercial and research engineers could all benefit from mutual investment and resource sharing.
 
Article
Secure intranets are founded on the protection of logical resources accessible in corporate enterprises. The paper discusses I-RBAC, role-based access control for intranet security which offers efficient security management based on varied levels of role authorizations
 
Article
Although much public attention has focused on the US digital TV transition- and the resulting reallocation of analog TV channels by auction to wireless carriers - the US Federal Communications Commission will decide how to reallocate an even larger swath of prime TV band spectrum this year: the unused "white space" between occupied DTV channels. This reallocation of unused spectrum from broadcasting to broadband permits unlicensed access for both fixed and mobile applications. Although this policy is strongly supported by high-tech companies and consumer advocates, it's just as strongly opposed by broadcast licensees and other incumbent users of the TV band.
 
Article
The AutoHan project implements a self-configuring software architecture for home area networks that offers an XML-based registry and HTTP-based service. The article begins by introducing the low-level architectures of the AutoHan project that enable different networking technologies to interoperate and define one logical IP network. It then describes the two core services that enable resources to export, discover and interoperate with AutoHan by using these low-level architectures. Finally, the article discusses naming and addressing issues for Internet access and shows how XML and HTTP allowed extension of the system to support Internet access through IHan (Internet home area network)
 
Article
The XML role-based access control (X-RBAC) specification language addresses multidomain environments' policy-specification needs. X-RBAC is based on an extension of the widely accepted US National Institute of Standards and Technology role-based access-control (RBAC) model. In addition to allowing specification of RBAC policies and facilitating specification of timing constraints on roles and access requirements, X-RBAC provides a framework for specifying mediation policies in a multidomain environment where RBAC policies have been employed.
 
Article
Combining distributed role-based access control with a public key infrastructure can facilitate secure, flexible data access in environments where enterprises collaborate via Web services. An approach to secure authentication and authorization for extended enterprises, which combines distributed role-based access control (RBAC), a public key infrastructure (PKI), and a privilege management infrastructure (PMI) is described. Moreover, a J2EE-based prototype system which shows the feasibility of the approach is implemented.
 
Three-level query scheme, using the travel domain as an example. (a) Relations from the query level express the user's search. (b) The query model transforms those relations to bear on virtual operations from the virtual level. (c) The model then matches virtual operations to concrete operations on the concrete level.
Article
For Web services to expand across the Internet, users need to be able to efficiently access and share Web services. The authors present a query infrastructure that treats Web services as first-class objects. It evaluates queries through the invocations of different Web service operations. Because efficiency plays a central role in such evaluations, the authors propose a query optimization model based on aggregating the quality of Web service (QoWS) parameters of different Web services. The model adjusts QoWS through a dynamic rating scheme and multilevel matching in which the rating provides an assessment of Web services' behavior. Multilevel matching allows the expansion of the solution space by enabling similar and partial answers.
 
Article
The authors present Gridella, a Gnutella-compatible P2P system. Gridella is based on the Peer-Grid (P-Grid) approach, which draws on research in distributed and cooperative information systems to provide a decentralized, scalable data access structure. Gridella improves the highly chaotic and inefficient Gnutella infrastructure with directed search and advanced concepts, thus enhancing efficiency and providing a model for further analysis and research
 
Article
As the only ubiquitous public data network, the Internet offers business partners a communications channel that previously existed only in unique situations with private, special-purpose networks. Well-publicized security risks, however, have limited the deployment of business-to-business extranets, which typically use the Internet's public data network infrastructure. These risks extend behind firewalls to intranets, where any user gaining entry to a facility is often implicitly authenticated to access unprotected services by simply plugging a portable computer into an unused network port. The author describes an approach that uses role-based access controls (RBACs) and Web session management to protect against network security breaches in the HTTP environment. The RBAC and session management services augment network-level security, such as firewalls, inherent in the deployment of any Web based system with untrusted interfaces. The RBACs are implemented through the Internet Engineering Task Force's Lightweight Directory Access Protocol (LDAP). Session management is implemented through cryptographically secured, cookie-based ticket mechanisms
 
Article
Java has begun to open up new possibilities for accessing applications on the Web. With Java, developers can write applications as applets and insert them into Web pages. The user can then retrieve and execute them with local computing resources. We show how developers can use this feature to create a network computing platform that lets Web users share applications not specifically devised for network use, including those that are computationally intensive. With our approach, the network is not involved as long as the user executes operations on the graphical interface, which is executed locally on the client. Only when users require some computational response from the server do they need to access it. Access is straightforward; authorized users can access the application from any node connected with the Internet as long as they have a Java-enabled Web browser. We have used used one such network computing platform to port an existing tool and develop a new application.
 
Top-cited authors
Greg Linden
Amit Sheth
  • University of South Carolina
Michael N Huhns
  • University of South Carolina
Ian Foster
  • University of Chicago
Schahram Dustdar