Drugs

Published by Springer Verlag
Online ISSN: 0012-6667
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Article
Ingenol mebutate is the main active constituent of sap from the plant Euphorbia peplus, which has traditionally been used as a home remedy for various skin conditions. Ingenol mebutate gel is approved in the US, EU, Australia and Brazil for the topical treatment of actinic keratosis. A short course of field-directed therapy with topical ingenol mebutate gel was effective in the treatment of actinic keratoses on the face or scalp (ingenol mebutate gel 0.015% once daily for 3 consecutive days) and on the trunk or extremities (ingenol mebutate gel 0.05% once daily for 2 consecutive days), according to the results of four randomized, double-blind, vehicle-controlled, multicentre studies. Significantly higher complete clearance rates (primary endpoint) and partial clearance rates were seen at day 57 in patients receiving ingenol mebutate gel than in those receiving vehicle gel. Treatment with ingenol mebutate gel was generally associated with sustained clearance of actinic keratoses in the longer term. Topical ingenol mebutate gel was generally well tolerated in the treatment of patients with actinic keratoses on the face or scalp and on the trunk or extremities. Application-site conditions were the most commonly occurring adverse events.
 
Article
Dendritic epithelial keratitis is most commonly caused by infections of herpes simplex virus (HSV) type 1 (HSV-1), and less frequently by HSV type 2 (HSV-2). Ganciclovir, a guanosine nucleoside analogue, is a well established broad-spectrum antiviral agent that inhibits replication of viral DNA and is active against both HSV-1 and -2 and several other viruses. Ganciclovir ophthalmic gel 0.15% is a five-times-daily topical preparation that is indicated for the treatment of acute herpetic keratitis (dendritic ulcers). A randomized, open-label, phase III trial in immunocompetent patients with acute herpetic keratitis showed that ganciclovir ophthalmic gel 0.15% applied five times daily provided effective clinical resolution of dendritic ulcers following 7 days of treatment (primary endpoint). Moreover, a retrospective analysis of noninferiority showed that ganciclovir ophthalmic gel 0.15% was no less effective than aciclovir (acyclovir) ointment 3%. A pooled analysis of three randomized, single-masked, phase II multinational trials also showed high rates of dendritic ulcer healing at day 7 for eyes treated with ganciclovir ophthalmic gel 0.15% and aciclovir ointment 3%. Furthermore, in the individual phase II trials, most patients showed evidence of healed dendritic and geographic ulcers at day 14 in either treatment arm. Median healing times with either treatment ranged from 6 to 10 days. Ganciclovir ophthalmic gel 0.15% was generally well tolerated and was associated with a significantly lower incidence of visual disturbances than aciclovir ointment 3% in the phase III trial.
 
Article
0.4% Nitroglycerin ointment is an intra-anal formulation of nitroglycerin (glyceryl trinitrate) indicated for the treatment of chronic anal fissure pain.black triangle Nitroglycerin is a nitric oxide (NO) donor, which reduces the increased anal canal pressure caused by a hypertonic internal anal sphincter, improving anodermal blood flow. A twice-daily 375 mg application of 0.4% nitroglycerin ointment, delivering a daily nitroglycerin dose of 3mg, significantly increased the rate of decrease in mean visual-analogue-scale pain scores, recorded daily, versus placebo (actual vehicle) over the first 3 and 8 weeks of treatment in patients with chronic anal fissure pain participating in randomised double-blind trials. Most recipients of 0.4% nitroglycerin ointment experienced headache, which was transient but severe in 20-25% of patients in randomised double-blind trials; however, compliance was generally good with few study withdrawals. Features and properties of 0.4% nitroglycerin (Rectogesic) rectal ointment Indication Pain associated with chronic anal fissures Mechanism of action Donor of nitric oxide Mediates relaxation of internal anal sphincter Dosage and administration Dosage 375 mg of 0.4% nitroglycerin rectal ointment, delivering nitroglycerin 1.5 mg Frequency Twice daily Route of administration Intra-anal Pharmacokinetic profile Mean bioavailability (0.2% nitroglycerin ointment, 0.75 mg nitroglycerin dose)50%Maximum plasma concentration 0.1 to >1 microg/L Volume of distribution approximate, equals 3 L/kg Clearance approximate, equals 1 L/kg/min Elimination half-life approximate, equals 3 min Most common adverse event Headache.
 
Article
Levofloxacin 0.5% ophthalmic solution (Cravit, Quixin, Oftaquix) has well established efficacy and tolerability in the treatment of external ocular infections. Levofloxacin 0.5% ophthalmic solution was generally more effective than ofloxacin 0.3% ophthalmic solution in the treatment of external ocular infections, and noninferiority was seen between levofloxacin 0.5% ophthalmic solution and both moxifloxacin 0.5% and tosufloxacin 0.3% ophthalmic solutions in the treatment of bacterial conjunctivitis. Although levofloxacin 0.5% ophthalmic solution administered in the hour prior to surgery did not reduce the incidence of endophthalmitis in patients undergoing intraocular surgery, additional data are needed to examine an optimal preoperative regimen of this antibacterial; preoperative levofloxacin 0.5% ophthalmic solution plus an iodine eyewash reduced positive culture rates in patients undergoing intraocular surgery. Levofloxacin 0.5% ophthalmic solution was well tolerated in the treatment of external ocular infections. Thus, levofloxacin 0.5% ophthalmic solution remains an important option in the treatment of bacterial conjunctivitis and other external ocular infections, as well as for perioperative use.
 
Article
The fourth-generation 8-methoxyfluoroquinolone moxifloxacin is available as an 0.5% ophthalmic solution for use in the treatment of bacterial conjunctivitis. Moxifloxacin had good activity against various Gram-positive and -negative ocular isolates in vitro, and moxifloxacin 0.5% ophthalmic solution achieved good penetration into ocular tissues in healthy volunteers and patients undergoing ocular surgery. The efficacy of moxifloxacin 0.5% ophthalmic solution in the treatment of bacterial conjunctivitis has been shown in three randomized, double-blind, multicentre trials. In a trial in patients aged ≥1 year, the clinical success rate was significantly higher with moxifloxacin 0.5% ophthalmic solution than with placebo. In a trial in patients aged ≥12 years, moxifloxacin 0.5% ophthalmic solution was noninferior to levofloxacin 0.5% ophthalmic solution in terms of the clinical success rate. In a third trial, the clinical cure rate was significantly higher with moxifloxacin 0.5% ophthalmic solution than with trimethoprim 1.0%/polymixin B 10,000 IU/mL ophthalmic solution in paediatric patients aged ≤18 years. Moxifloxacin 0.5% ophthalmic solution was well tolerated in patients with bacterial conjunctivitis. Ocular adverse events (e.g. eye pain, eye irritation) were the most commonly reported treatment-related adverse events, with the majority being of mild severity.
 
Article
Loteprednol etabonate ophthalmic gel 0.5 % (Lotemax(®)) is approved in the USA for the treatment of post-operative inflammation and pain in patients who have undergone ocular surgery. The new gel formulation of loteprednol etabonate offers some potential advantages over the previously available ophthalmic suspension and ointment formulations of the drug. Because the gel is non-settling, a uniform dose of loteprednol etabonate is delivered without the need to vigorously shake the product. The pH of the gel formulation is close to that of physiological tears and the concentration of preservative is low. In clinical trials, loteprednol etabonate ophthalmic gel 0.5 % for 14 days was effective, very well tolerated and safe when used for the treatment of post-operative inflammation and pain following cataract surgery. Relative to vehicle, loteprednol etabonate ophthalmic gel 0.5 % effectively reduced postoperative ocular inflammation and ocular pain and had a similar overall tolerability, comfort and safety profile. It is associated with a low risk of inducing clinically significant increases in intraocular pressure. In conclusion, loteprednol etabonate ophthalmic gel 0.5 % is an additional formulation option for the short-term treatment of post-operative inflammation and pain in patients who have undergone ocular surgery. It provides uniform dosing of a topical ophthalmic corticosteroid that has been demonstrated to be effective and well-tolerated in the treatment of ocular inflammation.
 
Article
Besifloxacin is a novel fluoroquinolone that, like other fluoroquinolones, acts by inhibiting the essential bacterial enzymes DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV. Topical besifloxacin ophthalmic suspension 0.6% is indicated for use in patients with bacterial conjunctivitis caused by susceptible bacteria. Besifloxacin had in vitro activity against a broad spectrum of Gram-positive and -negative bacteria that commonly cause ocular infections (e.g. Haemophilus influenzae, Staphylococcus aureus, S. epidermidis and Streptococcus pneumoniae), including drug-resistant strains. In two randomized, double-blind, multicentre trials, besifloxacin ophthalmic suspension 0.6% administered at the recommended dose for 5 days in patients aged ≥1 year with bacterial conjunctivitis was significantly (p<0.01) more effective than vehicle in terms of clinical resolution and microbial eradication rates (coprimary endpoints) at study visit two (day 5±1) or three (day 8 or 9) [primary timepoints]. Besifloxacin ophthalmic suspension 0.6% was noninferior to moxifloxacin ophthalmic solution 0.5% in patients aged ≥1 year with bacterial conjunctivitis with regard to clinical resolution (58.3% vs 59.4%) and microbial eradication (93.3% vs 91.1%) rates on day 5±1 of treatment (coprimary endpoints) in a randomized, double-blind, multicentre trial; both drugs were administered at a dosage of one drop in the affected eye(s) three times daily for 5 days. Besifloxacin ophthalmic suspension 0.6% was generally well tolerated in clinical trials, with most adverse events being mild in severity. The tolerability profile of besifloxacin ophthalmic suspension 0.6% was similar to that of moxifloxacin ophthalmic solution 0.5%.
 
Article
The fixed low-dose combination of the ACE inhibitor perindopril and the non-thiazide diuretic indapamide has been evaluated in the management of patients with mild to moderate hypertension. Combination therapy aims to improve overall therapeutic efficacy while minimising adverse effects. In well-designed multicentre clinical trials, perindopril/indapamide at doses ranging from 2/0.625 to 8/2.5 mg/day was significantly more effective than placebo in achieving adequate blood pressure (BP) control. A similar reduction in supine BP was observed when combined perindopril/indapamide 2/0.625 mg/day was compared with losartan 50 mg/day or atenolol 50 mg/day. Similar reductions in 24-hour ambulatory BP were also seen with perindopril/indapamide 2/0.625 mg/day and irbesartan 150 mg/day. However, response and normalisation rates were significantly higher with combination therapy than with losartan or irbesartan monotherapy. Combined perindopril/indapamide 2/0.625 mg/day therapy effectively reduced BP in elderly patients aged 65 to 85 years to a significantly greater extent than either atenolol 50 mg/day or placebo. Supine BP was also normalised in approximately two-thirds of patients in a small noncomparative trial in patients with hypertension and renal impairment. Low-dose perindopril/indapamide 2/0.625 mg/day was well tolerated in clinical trials; the most common adverse events were headache and cough. Hypokalaemia, associated with the use of diuretics, occurred with a higher incidence with combined perindopril/indapamide 2/0.625 mg/day therapy than with either atenolol 50 mg/day or placebo. Perindopril/indapamide 2/0.625 mg/day has shown efficacy in well designed comparative trials with atenolol, losartan and irbesartan including elderly patients and patients with renal impairment. Studies comparing this dosage of perindopril/ indapamide with other combination therapies would be beneficial in allowing the place of perindopril/indapamide to be more accurately determined. The fixed-low dose combination of perindopril/indapamide provides a promising and well tolerated treatment option in the management of patients with mild to moderate hypertension.
 
Article
Low-dose drug combinations have been proposed in International Guidelines for use in patients with hypertension. The fixed low-dose combination of perindopril 2mg with indapamide 0.625mg combines an angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor with a non-thiazide diuretic. Coadministration of perindopril and indapamide did not have any clinically significant effects on the pharmacokinetic profile of either agent in healthy volunteers. In experimental models of hypertension, perindopril/indapamide restored endothelial function, improved microvascular density, reduced left ventricular and aortic hypertrophy, and reversed renal end-organ damage. Once daily oral perindopril 2mg/indapamide 0.625mg normalised blood pressure (BP) in 83.6% of elderly patients with essential hypertension (diastolic BP was reduced to < or =90mm Hg) and 81.7% of those with isolated systolic hypertension (systolic BP was reduced to <160mm Hg) after approximately 1 year of treatment. BP normalisation was sustained in 79.8% of patients throughout the study. Fixed low-dose perindopril/indapamide had a tolerability profile similar to that of placebo in clinical trials; most adverse events were of mild to moderate severity. Coadministration of the 2 agents reduced the incidence of hypokalaemia seen with indapamide alone.
 
Article
A large scale multicentre clinical study was undertaken to assess the efficacy and tolerability of cefixime in the treatment of acute otitis media in children. A total of 25,863 evaluable children with acute otitis media received cefixime 8 mg/kg once daily for at least 10 days. At the end of treatment, 86% of patients were considered to be either cured or improved. These results are consistent with those achieved with cefixime in controlled clinical trials. Adverse effects were reported in 11.5% of patients, but were judged to be related to cefixime therapy in only 9.4% of patients. The results of this study demonstrate that cefixime is an effective and well tolerated treatment for acute otitis media in children.
 
Article
Serotyping of Vibrio cholerae is based on the somatic '0' antigen. Cholera is caused by the 01 serotype ev. cholerae 01), and there were pre­ viously a total of 138 serotypes identified. A new serotype of V. cholerae has recently been identified as the pathogen responsible for explosive outbreaks of severe dehydrating diarrhoea in India and Bangladesh. This has been designated V. cholerae 0139. [1] Since it produces an illness that is clinically indistinguishable from cholera, it is considered to be another serotype of V. cholerae that can cause cholera.[2] The synonym 'Bengal' has been proposed because the serotype was first isolated along the Bay of Bengal. Replacement of fluid and electrolyte losses is the most important part of tbe management of patients with cholera caused by V. cholerae 01 or V. cholerae 0139. Treatment of cholera due to V. cholerae 01 with effective antimicrobials has been useful in shortening the duration of diarrhoea and faecal excretion of the pathogen, and in reduc­ ing the volume of watery stools, with subsequent decreased requirement for rehydration fluids. This randomised clinical trial was conducted at the Diarrhoea Treatment Centre of the Interna
 
Article
The second-generation macrolide azithromycin is available as a 1.5% ophthalmic solution for use in the treatment of bacterial or trachomatous conjunctivitis. This article reviews the pharmacological properties of azithromycin 1.5% ophthalmic solution and its clinical efficacy and tolerability in patients with purulent bacterial conjunctivitis or trachomatous conjunctivitis caused by Chlamydia trachomatis. Azithromycin 1.5% ophthalmic solution had good in vitro activity against Haemophilus influenzae and C. trachomatis, and achieved good concentrations in tear samples from healthy volunteers. Azithromycin 1.5% ophthalmic solution for 3 days (1 drop twice daily) was noninferior to tobramycin 0.3% ophthalmic solution for 7 days (1 drop every 2 hours) in paediatric and adult patients with purulent bacterial conjunctivitis, with regard to clinical cure and bacteriological resolution on day 9, in a randomized, investigator-masked, multicentre study. In children with trachomatous inflammation, 3-day treatment with azithromycin 1.5% ophthalmic solution was noninferior to a single dose of azithromycin oral suspension, with regard to clinical cure rate in the worst eye at 60 days, in a randomized, double-masked, multicentre study. Azithromycin 1.5% ophthalmic solution was well tolerated in patients with bacterial or trachomatous conjunctivitis. Most events were of mild to moderate severity.
 
Article
Indapamide sustained release (SR) 1.5mg is a new galenic formulation that is characterised by a relatively constant plasma concentration at steady state, with only minor fluctuations during the 24-hour period. A dose-titration study of 3 doses of indapamide SR (1.5, 2 and 2.5mg) given once daily has shown that the 3 dosages are equipotent in lowering blood pressure, and have an effect similar to that of indapamide immediate-release (IR) 2.5mg; all were statistically more effective than placebo. The percentage of hypertensive patients whose serum potassium was less than 3.4 mmol/L was significantly lower after indapamide SR 1.5mg than after indapamide IR 2.5mg. Neither indapamide formulation had any significant effects on lipid profile, glucose, urea and serum creatinine; only uric acid was slightly raised during the 2-month study. In an equivalence study, indapamide SR 1.5mg and IR 2.5mg produced similar blood pressure reductions (within the equivalence limit of ±5mm Hg), whereas the percentage of patients whose serum potassium fell to less than 3.4 mmol/L was lower in the IR 1.5mg group than in the SR 2.5mg group. Antihypertensive treatment with indapamide SR 1.5mg once daily produced reductions in blood pressure in elderly patients with systolic/diastolic or isolated systolic hypertension that were similar to reductions with amlodipine 5 mg/day. The incidence of adverse effects was very low in all studies with indapamide SR 1.5mg and very similar to that in the placebo group, confirming thereby the improvement in the efficacy : tolerance ratio with the new indapamide compound.
 
Article
Synopsis: Pizotifen2 is a benzocycloheptathiophene derivative possessing a strong antagonistic action against certain biogenic amines. It is indicated in the prophylactic treatment of severe and recurrent vascular headaches, but is of no value in the treatment of acute attacks. Pizotifen is structurally similar to cyproheptadine and the tricyclic antidepressants, and has been shown to exert strong antiserotonin and antihistaminic effects, together with a weak anticholinergic activity. These antagonistic effects are evidently related to the drug’s mode of action in reducing the occurrence of migrainous attacks, as it is now considered that the pathogenesis of migraine involves the action of a number of vasoactive substances (including serotonin, histamine, noradrenaline, acetylcholine and bradykinin) on the microcirculation. Most, but not all, therapeutic trials have obtained reasonably good results in patients suffering from either classic or common migraine and also in patients with cluster headache (migrainous neuralgia). Controlled studies have in general shown pizotifen to be significantly more effective than a placebo, but usually less effective than methysergide. In some cases however, patients who have failed to respond to methysergide have responded to pizotifen. In other forms of headache, such as tension or muscle contraction headache, post-traumatic headache, inflammatory headache and trigeminal neuralgia, pizotifen has generally had little effect. With usual therapeutic doses (1.5 to 3 mg daily) drowsiness and increased appetite (with weight gain) frequently occur. In the majority of patients, these symptoms usually prove mild and tend to diminish during prolonged therapy.
 
Article
The quadrivalent HPV types 6, 11, 16, 18 vaccine (Gardasil®) is a recombinant vaccine comprising purified virus-like particles derived from the L1 capsid proteins of HPV types 6, 11, 16 and 18. The vaccine was highly immunogenic. Geometric mean titres (GMTs) and seroconversion rates for all four HPV types at month 7 in males aged 10–15 years were noninferior to those in females aged 16–23 years, and those in males aged 9–15 years were noninferior to those in females aged 9–15 years. In addition, GMTs and seroconversion rates in males aged 16–26 years receiving the vaccine were higher than those receiving amorphous aluminium hydroxyphosphate sulfate adjuvant (AAHS) control. The quadrivalent HPV vaccine was significantly more effective than AAHS control at decreasing the incidence of HPV 6-, 11-, 16- or 18-related external genital lesions (primary endpoint) in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, multicentre study in males aged 16–26 years. The most common clinical endpoint was HPV 6- and 11-related condyloma; efficacy was robust against these lesions. The vaccine is also expected to be protective against genital warts in males aged 9–15 years, as the immune response in males of this age group was noninferior to that in males aged 16–26 years. The quadrivalent HPV vaccine was generally well tolerated in males aged 9–26 years. The most common adverse events reported were injection-site related, and most of these were of mild to moderate severity.
 
Postmarketing surveillance of quadrivalent human papilloma virus (HPV) [types 6, 11, 16, 18] recombinant vaccine. The most common adverse events related to immunization with quadrivalent HPV vaccine reported to the US Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System between 1 June 2006 and 31 December 2008. [49]  
Article
Quadrivalent human papilloma virus (HPV) [types 6, 11, 16, 18] recombinant vaccine (Gardasil®; Silgard®) is composed of virus-like particles (VLPs) formed by self-assembly of recombinant L1 capsid protein from each of HPV types 6, 11, 16 and 18. The VLPs are noninfectious, containing no DNA, and are highly immunogenic, inducing high levels of neutralizing antibodies against the particular HPV types when administered to animals or humans. Quadrivalent HPV vaccine is indicated for use from the age of 9 years for the prevention of premalignant genital lesions (cervical, vulvar and vaginal), cervical cancer and external genital warts (condyloma acuminata) causally related to certain oncogenic or specific HPV types. In placebo-controlled clinical trials, quadrivalent HPV vaccine administered as three doses over 6 months provided high-level protection against infection or disease caused by the vaccine HPV types over 2-4 years of follow-up in females aged 15-45 years who were naive to the vaccine HPV types. A degree of cross-protection against certain other non-vaccine high-risk HPV types was also observed. The vaccine is not effective against current infection with a vaccine HPV type. Girls or women with current infection with one or more of the vaccine HPV types gained protection from infection or disease caused by the remaining vaccine HPV types and they were also protected against reinfection with the same HPV type after clearance of an infection caused by a vaccine HPV type. High seroconversion rates and high levels of anti-HPV antibodies were observed in all vaccinated individuals of all age ranges from 9 to 45 years. No correlation was found between antibody levels and protective efficacy of the vaccine. Rechallenge with quadrivalent HPV vaccine produced a potent anamnestic humoral immune response. The vaccine is generally well tolerated and is projected to be cost effective in most pharmacoeconomic models. Therefore, quadrivalent HPV vaccine offers an effective means, in combination with screening programmes, to substantially reduce the burden of HPV-related precancerous lesions and cancer, particularly cervical cancer, as well as anogenital warts.
 
Article
Human papillomavirus (HPV) quadrivalent recombinant vaccine is a mixture of virus-like particles derived from the L1 capsid proteins of HPV types 6, 11, 16 and 18. It is administered intramuscularly in a three-dose regimen, with the initial injection followed by subsequent doses at months 2 and 6. The vaccine is indicated for use in the prevention of cervical cancer, vulvar and vaginal precancer and cancers, precancerous lesions and genital warts associated with HPV types 6, 11, 16 or 18 infection in adolescents and young women. ▴ The quadrivalent vaccine has demonstrated good immunogenicity in young women (16–26 years) and male and female adolescents (aged 9–15 years), inducing high and persistent anti-HPV antibody titres. In a randomised phase III trial designed to bridge efficacy in young women to adolescents (using immunogenicity as a surrogate), the quadrivalent HPV vaccine in adolescents was at least as immunogenic as that in young women. ▴ In randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trials in >20 000 young women (aged 16–26 years), the vaccine was highly effective in preventing cervical dysplasia of any grade and external genital lesions related to HPV types 6, 11, 16 and 18 infection. These women were followed up for an average of 2 years. ▴ The vaccine was well tolerated, with injection-site reactions and fever being the most common vaccine-related adverse events.
 
Article
Buprenorphine, a derivative of the morphine alkaloid thebaine, is a strong analgesic with marked narcotic antagonist activity. In studies in relatively small groups of postoperative patients with moderate to severe pain, one or a few doses of buprenorphine parenterally (by intramuscular or slow intravenous injection) or sublingually were at least as effective as standard doses of other strong analgesics such as morphine, pethidine or pentazocine, and buprenorphine was longer acting than these agents. Only a small number of patients with chronic pain have received repeated doses, but in such patients there was no need for increased doses during several weeks to months of treatment. Buprenorphine appears to produce side effects which are similar to those seen with other morphine-like compounds, including respiratory depression. There is apparently no completely reliable specific antagonist for buprenorphine's respiratory depressant effect, since even very high doses of the antagonist drug naloxone may produce only a partial reversal. The respiratory stimulant drug doxapram has overcome respiratory depression in volunteers and in a few patients in a clinical setting, but such studies have not been done in an overdose situation. Animal studies and a direct addiction study in a few volunteers suggest that the dependence liability of buprenorphine may be lower than that of other older morphine-like drugs. However, a slowly emerging abstinence syndrome did occur on withdrawal after very high doses administered for 1 to 2 months. A definitive statement on the drug's dependence liability and abuse potential cannot be made until it has had much wider use for a longer period of time.
 
Article
Although antiangiogenic treatments have produced milestone advances in the treatment of several diseases, and have significantly extended the median survival of cancer patients, these agents share some weaknesses, including a limited impact on the overall cure rate, a fleeting effect because of redundant pathways or early appearance of resistance mechanisms, and the lack of predictive factors for treatment selection. Recent data suggest that antibodies targeting the vascular endothelial growth factor axis exert their activity through the inhibition of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 phosphorylation, which has a pivotal role in the neoangiogenic process. Ramucirumab, a fully humanized monoclonal antibody specifically directed against the extracellular domain of the receptor, administered intravenously every 2 or 3 weeks, is emerging as a novel antiangiogenic opportunity. Starting with preclinical data and early clinical results, this concise review focuses on the development of the novel compound across multiple cancers (including gastrointestinal malignancies, breast cancer, lung carcinoma, and genitourinary tumors), and presents available data from randomized phase II and phase III trials. REGARD was the first phase III study to report on the efficacy of single-agent ramucirumab in patients with advanced cancer. Many other ongoing phase III trials are testing the efficacy of this interesting antiangiogenic compound as a single agent or in combination with chemotherapy in different cancer types.
 
Article
Inhibition of the enzyme 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 (11β-HSD1) has been proposed as a novel therapeutic target for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus. Over 170 new compounds targeting 11β-HSD1 have been developed. This article reviews the current published literature on compounds that have reached phase II clinical trials in patients with type 2 diabetes, and summarises the preclinical evidence that such agents may be useful for associated conditions, including peripheral vascular disease, coronary artery disease and cognitive decline. In clinical trials, 11β-HSD1 inhibitors have been well tolerated and have improved glycaemic control, lipid profile and blood pressure, and induced modest weight loss. The magnitude of the effects are small relative to other agents, so that further development of 11β-HSD1 inhibitors for the primary therapeutic indication of type 2 diabetes has stalled. Ongoing programmes are focused on additional benefits for cognitive function and other cardiovascular risk factors.
 
Article
Amoxicillin/clavulanic acid 2000mg/125mg extended release (Augmentin XR), referred to herein as amoxicillin/clavulanic acid XR, is a pharmacokinetically enhanced formulation designed to provide more effective therapy in adults and adolescents than conventional formulations against community-acquired respiratory tract pathogens, particularly Streptococcus pneumoniae, with reduced susceptibility to amoxicillin. Amoxicillin/clavulanic acid XR maintains plasma amoxicillin concentrations above 4 microg/mL for a mean of 49% of the dosing interval indicating that it would be highly effective against S. pneumoniae strains with minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) above the National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standard's amoxicillin +/- clavulanic acid susceptibility breakpoint of < or =2 microg/mL. Amoxicillin/clavulanic acid XR is at least as effective as conventional amoxicillin/clavulanic acid formulations, levofloxacin and clarithromycin in treating community-acquired pneumonia, acute bacterial sinusitis or acute exacerbations of chronic bronchitis, and has a tolerability profile comparable to that of conventional amoxicillin/clavulanic acid formulations. While the incidence of amoxicillin- or multidrug-resistant S. pneumoniae is not currently sufficient in most regions to warrant the routine empirical use of amoxicillin/clavulanic acid XR, the drug would be extremely useful in those regions with a high incidence of resistant pathogens or in selected patients (i.e. those with S. pneumoniae isolates having amoxicillin MICs > or =2 microg/mL but < or =4 microg/mL).
 
Article
Pneumococcal polysaccharide conjugate vaccine (13-valent, adsorbed) [PCV13] is approved for protection against pneumococcal disease in children aged 6 weeks to 5 years and adults aged ≥50 years. In randomized trials in adults aged 60–64 years (not previously vaccinated with 23-valent pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine [PPV23]) and ≥70 years (previously vaccinated with PPV23), PCV13 was non-inferior to PPV23 in opsonophagocytic assay (OPA) geometric mean titres (GMTs) for all 12 serotypes common to the two vaccines. More PCV13 than PPV23 recipients had ≥4-fold increases in serotype 6A OPA GMTs (serotype 6A is not included in PPV23). PCV13 recipients also had higher OPA GMTs and met superiority criteria for most serotypes. Adults aged 50–59 years had antibody responses to PCV13 that were noninferior to those in adults aged 60–64 years for all included serotypes. PCV13 administered concomitantly with trivalent inactivated influenza vaccine in adults aged 50–59 or ≥65 years produced antibody responses that were noninferior to those following sequential administration, except for influenza strain A/H3N2 and pneumococcal serotype 19F in those aged ≥65 years. Antibody responses were numerically higher with sequential administration, although the clinical significance of this is unknown. Adverse events within 14 days of vaccination were mostly of mild-to-moderate severity, with serious events occurring in 0.2–1.4% of PCV13 and 0.4–1.7% of PPV23 recipients.
 
Article
The pneumococcal polysaccharide conjugate vaccine Prevenar 13® (PCV13) comprises 13 capsular Streptococcus pneumoniae polysaccharide serotypes that are individually conjugated to nontoxic diphtheria protein (cross-reactive material [CRM197]). In randomized, comparator-controlled, phase III trials in healthy infants aged 2–6 months, PCV13 elicited a strong immune response against all 13 pneumococcal serotypes in terms of the proportion of vaccinees achieving reference antibody levels with a two- or three-dose primary vaccination series. Immune responses for the seven serotypes common to PCV13 and the 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine Prevenar® (PCV7) were generally similar. Antibodies to all vaccine serotypes were functional. A booster dose of PCV13 administered between 11 and 15 months of age generally boosted the immune response against all 13 serotypes, regardless of whether infants had previously received PCV13 or PCV7 during the primary vaccination phase. Robust immune responses against all serotypes were achieved when PCV13 was administered as catch-up vaccination schedules in older infants and young children aged 7–72 months. Importantly, PCV13 did not interfere with the immune responses to coadministered routine paediatric vaccines. Based on data for PCV7, it is expected that PCV13 will also display protective efficacy against invasive pneumococcal disease, otitis media and pneumonia. PCV13 was generally well tolerated, with an adverse event profile similar to that of PCV7 after any vaccine dose.
 
Article
Sulfasalazine was first used for rheumatic polyarthritis in the 1940s and in the past 2 decades has become firmly established as a disease-modifying antirheumatic drug (DMARD). The drug is split by the action of bacterial azoreductases in the large intestine into sulfapyridine and mesalazine (mesalamine, 5-aminosalicylic acid), although whether the parent molecule or the sulfapyridine moiety, or both, is the active principle remains uncertain. Sulfasalazine is an effective treatment for rheumatoid arthritis (RA), producing improvements in disease parameters similar to those seen with penicillamine, hydroxychloroquine or oral or parenteral gold in comparative clinical trials. However, there are no direct comparisons of the drug with methotrexate. Most adverse events associated with sulfasalazine are minor and tend to occur within 3 months of starting therapy. A meta-analysis of studies investigating DMARD therapy, which included almost 5000 evaluable patients, concluded that sulfasalazine was close to methotrexate in terms of efficacy but was slightly less well tolerated. However, unlike sulfasalazine, many DMARDs may be unsuitable for women who are, or may become, pregnant because of their potential to cause teratogenic effects. Sulfasalazine may also offer a more rapid onset of action than other DMARDs and may slow down the radiological progression of RA. Combination therapy with other DMARDs, particularly methotrexate, appears more effective than single DMARD therapy. If the safety of these regimens is shown in large numbers of patients they are likely to become more widely used in the future. Sulfasalazine is a therapy of first choice in patients with RA and may be the DMARD of choice in women who are, or may become, pregnant.
 
Article
The emergence of multidrug-resistant (MDR) Gram-negative bacilli creates a challenge in the treatment of nosocomial infections. While the pharmaceutical pipeline is waning, two revived old antibacterials (colistin and fosfomycin), a newer one (tigecycline) and an ‘improved’ member of an existing class (doripenem) are the only therapeutic options left. The class of polymyxins, known since 1947 and represented mostly by polymyxin B and polymyxin E (colistin), has recently gained a principal role in the treatment of the most problematic MDR Gram-negative pathogens (such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Acinetobacter baumannii, Klebsiella pneumoniae and Stenotrophomonas maltophilia). Future prospective studies are needed to answer important clinical questions, such as the possible benefit of combination with other antimicrobials versus monotherapy, the efficacy of colistin in neutropenic hosts and the role of inhaled colistin. As new pharmacokinetic data emerge, clarification of the pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) profile of colistin as well as appropriate dosing seems urgent, while development of resistance must be carefully monitored. Fosfomycin tromethamine, a synthetic salt of fosfomycin discovered in 1969, has regained attention because of its in vitro activity against extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL)-producing Enterobacteriaceae and MDR P. aeruginosa. Although in use for decades in oral and parenteral formulations for a variety of infections without significant toxicity, its clinical utility in MDR infections remains to be explored in future studies. Tigecycline, the first representative of the new class of glycylcyclines, holds promise in infections from MDR K. pneumoniae (K. pneumoniae carbapenemase [KPC]- and ESBL-producing strains) and Enterobacteriaceae with various mechanisms of resistance. The in vitro activity of tigecycline against A. baumannii makes it a tempting option, as it is currently the most active compound against MDR strains along with colistin. However, the usual minimum inhibitory concentration values of this pathogen are approximately 2 mg/L and compromise clinical outcomes based on PK/PD issues. Its advantageous penetration into various tissues is useful in infections of the skin and soft tissues as well as intra-abdominal infections (official indications), whereas low serum concentrations compromise its use in bloodstream infections. Therefore, prospective studies with dose escalation are urgently needed, as well as clarification of its role in nosocomial pneumonia, after poor results in the study of ventilator-associated pneumonia. Finally, doripenem, the recently licensed member of the carbapenems (without significant spectrum alterations from the ascendant members) seems to possess a lower potential for resistance selection and a more favourable pharmacokinetic profile when given as an extended infusion. The latter strategy could prove helpful in overcoming low level resistance of A. baumannii and P. aeruginosa strains.
 
Article
The sensitivity to cefotaxime and amikacin of 14,272 Gram-negative bacilli (Enterobacteriaceae and non-fermenting Gram-negative bacilli) isolated from clinical samples was studied during the period 1980 to 1985. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) was determined by means of diffusion in agar. Strains were considered resistant to cefotaxime and amikacin if the MIC values were >16 mg/L and >8 mg/L, respectively. The MIC 90reached the critical value for cefotaxime in the case of Citrobacter spp., Escherichia coli, Klebsiella spp., Proteus mirabilis, Salmonella spp. and Shigella spp., and for amikacin in the case of Citrobacter spp., Enterobacter spp., E. coli, Klebsiella spp., P. mirabilis, Proteus vulgaris, Salmonella spp. and Serratia spp. Only Shigella spp. were sensitive to cefotaxime but not to amikacin, and only strains of Enterobacter spp. and Serratia spp. were sensitive to amikacin but not to cefotaxime.
 
Article
Single doses of epanolol (ICI 141,292) were administered to 12 healthy young male volunteers in a randomised crossover study. Each volunteer received a 200mg tablet, 200mg in solution or 5mg intravenously under fasting conditions, or a 200mg tablet with food. Venous blood samples were collected up to 72 hours after oral administration and 12 hours after intravenous administration. The concentrations of epanolol in plasma were determined by use of a radio-immunoassay technique, whereas those in urine samples were measured by a high pressure liquid Chromatographic (HPLC) method. Analysis of variance was used to assess the significance of the differences between the groups. Epanolol plasma concentrations declined biexponentially with time after an intravenous dose, with a half-life of 7 minutes for the first phase and about 3 hours for the second. Plasma clearance was high (2.1 L/min). Peak plasma concentrations of about 30 to 40 ng/ml were observed at mean times of about 1 to 1.5 hours after oral administration. After the peak, plasma concentrations declined biexponentially, with a terminal phase half-life of about 20 hours. The bioavailability of epanolol for the tablet and solution administered to fasted volunteers was similar (7–8%), but it was about 25% lower when administered as a tablet with food. Urinary recovery of epanolol was about 25% of the administered intravenous dose, but recoveries were much lower (about 1%) following oral administration. These data have been compared with those obtained after single oral doses of epanolol 200mg to elderly patients with angina and subjects with renal or hepatic impairment.
 
Article
After oral administration of [14C] felodipine (27.5mg) to 4 healthy volunteers, 6 main urinary metabolites were identified by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The compounds were isolated by solvent extraction at pH 2.2 and silylated prior to analysis. They were formed by dehydrogenation of felodipine followed by ester hydrolysis, hydroxylation of the alkyl groups and conjugation. These metabolites were excreted both as free acids and as conjugates accounting on average for 37% of the excreted amount (23% of the dose). A specific liquid chromatographic assay with radioactive detection was developed to determine the acidic metabolites in all collected samples. The urinary excretion rate declined biphasically for the mono-acids III and IV, whereas the excretion rates of metabolites VI, VII and VIII, formed via aliphatic hydroxylation, were better fitted to equations of first-order processes.
 
Article
In 363 outpatients with endoscopically confirmed gastric ulcers the efficacy and safety of roxatidine acetate 150 mg at night was compared to 75 mg twice daily. After 8 weeks' treatment substantial reductions in gastric ulcer diameter were obtained in addition to healing rates of 83.7 and 86% for the twice daily and night-time dosing, respectively. Daily reductions in day and night-time epigastric pain were obtained with no significant differences between treatment groups for pain scores or antacid tablet consumption. Furthermore, cigarette smoking did not influence the healing rates produced by either treatment schedule. 26 patients reported 32 adverse reactions and 5 patients discontinued treatment because of side effects, although only 1 of these was a severe reaction. The present data suggest that a single night-time dose of roxatidine acetate 150 mg is as safe and effective as the twice daily dose regimen for the management of acute gastric ulceration.
 
Article
A randomised multicentre, double-blind study of the efficacy and safety of roxatidine acetate 150 mg at bedtime or 75 mg twice a day was conducted in 300 outpatients with endoscopically confirmed duodenal ulcers. After 14 days' treatment with roxatidine acetate substantial reductions in ulcer sizes had been obtained, in addition to healing rates of 87 to 89%, with no significant differences between the dosage regimens. There were graded reductions in day and night-time assessment of epigastric pain for both treatment groups and no differences in the mean numbers of antacid tablets consumed. In addition, cigarette smoking did not influence the healing rates produced by either treatment schedule. 11 patients reported 12 mild adverse reactions, with gastrointestinal symptoms the most frequent, and no clinically significant alterations in laboratory values. The present data suggests that a single bedtime dose of roxatidine acetate 150 mg produces effective duodenal ulcer healing and pain relief equivalent to that produced by a twice daily dosage regimen.
 
Article
Bicalutamide (Casodex) is a competitive androgen receptor antagonist that inactivates androgen-regulated prostate cell growth and function, leading to cell apoptosis and inhibition of prostate cancer growth. It is administered orally as a once-daily dose. In the EU and a number of other countries, bicalutamide 150 mg/day is approved in men with locally advanced nonmetastatic prostate cancer as immediate therapy either as an adjuvant to active treatment or as monotherapy as an alternative to surgical or medical castration. Combined analysis of the three trials that comprise the bicalutamide Early Prostate Cancer (EPC) programme showed that bicalutamide administered in conjunction with standard care in men with locally advanced prostate cancer offers disease-free survival benefits over standard care alone and is generally well tolerated. Overall survival was improved to a greater extent in the subgroup of patients who received bicalutamide plus radiation therapy compared with radiation therapy alone. Men with localised prostate cancer do not benefit from the addition of bicalutamide to standard care. Combined analysis of two other studies in men with locally advanced prostate cancer show that bicalutamide monotherapy offers better tolerability and higher health-related quality-of-life (HR-QOL) scores for sexual interest and physical capacity compared with surgical or medical castration, while achieving disease-free and overall survival durations that were not significantly different. Thus, when treatment options are being evaluated, bicalutamide as adjuvant therapy or monotherapy should be considered as an alternative to other available hormonal therapies in men with locally advanced prostate cancer, especially in those who wish to maintain an active lifestyle.
 
Article
Cervarix™ is a prophylactic vaccine comprised of a mixture of virus-like particles derived from the L1 capsid proteins of human papillomavirus (HPV) types 16 and 18 formulated with the AS04 adjuvant system. It is administered by intramuscular injection as a three-dose vaccine regimen at 0, 1 and 6 months. The vaccine is indicated for the prevention of high-grade cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN 2 and CIN 3) and cervical cancer causally related to HPV types 16 and 18. ▴ In randomized, double-blind, phase II or III trials in >19 000 women aged 15–25 years, the HPV 16/18 vaccine showed high efficacy in preventing CIN 2+ associated with HPV 16/18. Cross-protection against new incident or 6-month persistent HPV 45 or HPV 31 infection was also evident. Phase II follow-up was for at least 5.5 years, and the phase III interim analysis was at ≈15 months after the first vaccine dose. ▴ In a bridging study, in adolescent girls aged 10–14 years, the HPV 16/18 vaccine induced twice the already high antibody titres as it did in young women (aged 15–25 years). The immune response in older women (aged 26–55 years) at 24 months in another study was ≥8-fold higher than antibody levels reported in younger age groups. Anti-HPV 16/18 antibody responses were greater with an AS04-adjuvanted HPV 16/18 vaccine than with an aluminium salt-adjuvanted formulation. ▴ The HPV 16/18 vaccine was generally well tolerated and injection-site reactions were the most common vaccine-related adverse events reported.
 
Article
The AS04-adjuvanted human papillomavirus (HPV) 16/18 vaccine (Cervarix®) is a noninfectious recombinant vaccine produced using purified virus-like particles (VLPs) that induce a strong immunogenic response eliciting high levels of anti-L1 VLP antibodies that persist at levels markedly greater than those observed with natural infection. The vaccine adjuvant (AS04) is composed of monophosphoryl-lipid A, which enhances cellular and humoral immune response, adsorbed to aluminium hydroxide. The vaccine is indicated for the prevention of premalignant cervical lesions and cervical cancer causally related to certain oncogenic HPV types in females aged ≥10 years. The AS04-adjuvanted HPV 16/18 vaccine administered in a three-dose schedule over 6 months elicits a high immunogenic response and is highly protective against cervical intraepithelial neoplasia and infection causally related to high-risk oncogenic HPV types. In well designed clinical trials in young women aged 15-25 years who were HPV 16/18 seronegative and DNA negative to 14 HPV high-risk types, high levels of immunogenicity and protection were sustained for follow-up periods of up to 8.4 years. High and persistent immunogenicity against infection with HPV 16/18 has also been demonstrated in older and younger females (aged 10-55 years) who were seronegative for vaccine HPV types. The AS04-adjuvanted HPV 16/18 vaccine elicited a greater immunogenic response than the quadrivalent HPV vaccine in women aged 18-45 years who were seronegative and DNA negative for HPV 16/18. The AS04-adjuvanted HPV 16/18 vaccine confers cross protection against certain non-vaccine, high-risk HPV types. A rapid and strong anamnestic humoral immune response was elicited following a fourth dose of the vaccine. The AS04-adjuvanted HPV 16/18 vaccine is generally well tolerated, and pharmacoeconomic analyses have demonstrated the potential for public health benefits and cost effectiveness when vaccination programmes are run in conjunction with screening programmes. Thus, the AS04-adjuvanted HPV 16/18 vaccine prevents cervical disease associated with certain oncogenic HPV types, thereby reducing the burden of premalignant cervical lesions and, very likely, cervical cancer.
 
Article
Edrecolomab is a mouse-derived monoclonal IgG2a antibody. It recognises the human tumourassociated antigen CO17-1A which is expressed on the cell surface of a wide variety of tumours and normal epithelial tissue. ▴ Edrecolomab is thought to destroy tumour cells by activating an array of endogenous cytotoxic mechanisms, including antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity and possibly antibody-dependent complement-mediated cytotoxicity. Edrecolomab may induce antitumour activity indirectly by inducing a host anti-idiotypic antibody response. ▴ Adjuvant therapy with edrecolomab (500mg initial dose followed by four 100mg infusions administered at 4-weekly intervals) significantly improved survival and reduced the tumour recurrence rate in patients with resected Dukes’ stage C colorectal cancer and minimal residual disease. ▴ Data from several small clinical trials suggest that edrecolomab given as monotherapy or in combination with other antineoplastic agents has limited efficacy in the treatment of advanced colorectal or pancreatic tumours. However, results from a small phase I study in patients with advanced breast cancer were more promising. ▴ Edrecolomab was generally well tolerated in clinical trials. In a postmarketing surveillance study, the most common adverse events associated with edrecolomab were flushing/erythema and gastrointestinal symptoms including diarrhoea, abdominal pain and nausea and vomiting. Because edrecolomab is of murine origin, anaphylactic reactions have developed in some patients treated with the drug.
 
Article
Hydrocortisone 17-butyrate is a new non-fluorinated topical corticosteroid for use in psoriasis, eczema and other inflammatory dermatoses. In double-blind paired comparisons with other topical corticosteroids, the efficacy of hydrocortisone 17-butyrate 0.1% has generally been indistinguishable from that of triamcinolone acetonide 0.1%, fluocinolone acetonide 0.025% or betamethasone 17-valerate 0.1% in patients with eczema or psoriasis. When applied to the face of patients with atrophy superimposed on rosacea and perioral dermatitis resulting from prolonged use of fluorinated topical corticosteroids, hydrocortisone 17-butyrate 0.1% did not prevent the beneficial effect of systemic tetracycline nor the disappearance of telangiectasis, and tended to be more effective than hydrocortisone 1%. This result suggests that hydrocortisone 17-butyrate may be suitable for long-term use on facial lesions, although the occurrence of moderate rebound eruption in about 10% of patients indicates the need for caution. The findings suggest that hydrocortisone 17-butyrate may be less liable to cause skin atrophy and adrenal suppression than some other potent topical corticosteroids, but trials to date have been too short to allow definite conclusions regarding possible long-term effects and have not involved infants or children.
 
Article
Remifentanil (Ultiva), a fentanyl derivative, is an ultra-short acting, nonspecific esterase-metabolised, selective mu-opioid receptor agonist, with a pharmacodynamic profile typical of opioid analgesic agents. Notably, the esterase linkage in remifentanil results in a unique and favourable pharmacokinetic profile for this class of agent. Adjunctive intravenous remifentanil during general anaesthesia is an effective and generally well tolerated opioid analgesic in a broad spectrum of patients, including adults and paediatric patients, undergoing several types of surgical procedures in both the inpatient and outpatient setting. Remifentanil is efficacious in combination with intravenous or volatile hypnotic agents, with these regimens generally being at least as effective as fentanyl- or alfentanil-containing regimens in terms of attenuation of haemodynamic, autonomic and somatic intraoperative responses, and postoperative recovery parameters. The rapid offset of action and short context-sensitive half-time of remifentanil, irrespective of the duration of the infusion, makes the drug a valuable opioid analgesic option for use during balanced general inhalational or total intravenous anaesthesia (TIVA) where rapid, titratable, intense analgesia of variable duration, and a fast and predictable recovery are required.
 
Article
This review considers recent pharmacological and biochemical studies of sulphasalazine and its colonic metabolites, 5-aminosalicylic acid and sulphapyridine, in relation to the use of the parent drug for the treatment of ulcerative colitis and, more recently, rheumatoid arthritis. Several factors make it difficult to analyse the mode of action of sulphasalazine, such as the aetiology and variable course of the conditions it is used to treat, lack of suitable animal models, and the question of which moiety of the drug is active. An important feature of the pharmacokinetics of the drug after oral administration is the significance of the azo cleavage of sulphasalazine due to bacterial action. The effects of sulphasalazine on the metabolism of arachidonic acid to prostaglandins and leukotrienes have been widely studied because of the evidence that these substances are formed in increased amounts in inflammatory bowel diseases. The effects are complex, but it appears that sulphasalazine and 5-aminosalicylic acid are weak and very weak inhibitors, respectively, of both cyclo-oxygenase- and lipoxygenase-dependent pathways. The overall pharmacological profile may favour a more marked inhibition of the lipoxygenase pathway because of the additional ability of 5-aminosalicylic acid to enhance prostanoid production and of sulphasalazine to inhibit prostaglandin inactivation. Drugs with selective lipoxygenase inhibitory actions in the colon should thus be sought so as not to compromise the prostaglandin pathway. Other properties of sulphasalazine, including its immunosuppressive, antifolate, lymphocyte inhibitory and leucocyte modulatory actions, are also discussed in the context of the therapeutic uses of the drug. However, it should be remembered that from a pharmacological point of view sulphasalazine cannot be classed as an anti-inflammatory drug (aspirin-like) in the generally accepted sense of the term.
 
Article
Psoriasis is a common chronic inflammatory disease of the skin that has a significant impact on quality of life. A small number of systemic therapies are well established in psoriasis management. These have immunosuppressive and/or anti-proliferative effects on the skin and immune system. As understanding of the pathogenesis of psoriasis has advanced over the last 2 decades, there has been clearer appreciation of the genetic, cellular and immunological components of disease expression, which has provided new insight into potential therapeutic targets, including the development of biological therapies. Biologics offer a unique opportunity to block or inhibit specific key components of psoriasis pathogenesis. The introduction of tumour necrosis factor (TNF).α and interleukin (IL)-12/-23 inhibitors has resulted in remarkable clinical responses in patients with severe psoriasis and has led to the development of a range of other cytokine modulators currently undergoing investigation. More recently, research in keratinocyte biology and immune cell function, particularly intracellular signalling, has afforded additional opportunities to develop a range of small-molecule oral preparations that may prove effective in disease control. This paper reviews current and emerging systemic treatments in the management of psoriasis.
 
Structures of the histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor classes studied in clinical trials. Examples are shown of selective and panHDAC inhibitors investigated in different clinical trials. Vorinostat (suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid [SAHA]) and valproic acid are two examples of pan-HDAC inhibitors that belong to hydroxamate and aliphatic acid classes of HDAC inhibitors, respectively. Pan-HDAC inhibitors target both class I and class II HDACs (HDACs 1-10), interfering with both histone and non-histone proteins. Romidepsin (depsipeptide) and MGCD 0103 are two examples of selective inhibitors of class I HDACs. Romidepsin and MGCD 0103 belong to cyclic peptide and benzamide classes of HDAC inhibitors, which target HDACs 1, 2 and HDACs 1, 2, 3 and 8, in class I HDACs, respectively.
Anticancer effects of histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors (HDACi). HDAC is a family of proteins that deacetylate histones, leading to compacted chromosome structure and repressed transcription. In addition to histones, non-histone proteins, such as transcription factors (p53, E2F1) and cytoplasmic proteins (Hsp90, Ku70, a-tubulin and b-catenin), can also be deacetylated by HDACs. These non-histone substrates are associated with growth, apoptosis, cell cycle and motility of cancer cells. HDACi represent a group of anticancer agents that can inhibit the enzymatic activity of HDACs, resulting in hyperacetylation of histones and non-histone substrates. Hyperacetylation of histones can relax chromatin structure and facilitate the transcription of genes, including cancer suppressor genes. Hyperacetylation of the non-histone proteins leads to the inhibition of proliferation and motility of cancer cells. HDACi exert their anticancer effect by inducing apoptosis, cell cycle arrest, and inhibition of angiogenesis and metastasis of cancer cells. Hsp90 = heat shock protein 90.  
Article
Histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors are a new group of anticancer agents that have a potential role in the regulation of gene expression, induction of cell death, apoptosis and cell cycle arrest of cancer cells by altering the acetylation status of chromatin and other non-histone proteins. In clinical trials, HDAC inhibitors have demonstrated promising antitumour activity as monotherapy in cutaneous T-cell lymphoma and other haematological malignancies. In solid tumours, several HDAC inhibitors have been shown to be efficacious as single agents; however, results of most clinical trials were in favour of using HDAC inhibitors either prior to the initiation of chemotherapy or in combination with other treatments. Currently, the molecular basis of response to HDAC inhibitors in patients is not fully understood. In this review, we summarize the current status of HDAC inhibitors, as single agents or in combination with other agents in different phases of clinical trials. In most of the clinical trials, HDAC inhibitors were tolerable and exerted biological or antitumor activity. HDAC inhibitors have been studied in phase I, II and III clinical trials with variable efficacy. The combination of HDAC inhibitors with other anticancer agents including epigenetic or chemotherapeutic agents demonstrated favourable clinical outcome.
 
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Steve Clissold
Monique Curran
  • Oncue writing
Roger M Pinder
Paul L Mccormack
  • Springer Healthcare
Bret Fulton
  • Beatties Pharmacy