Computer Methods in Applied Mechanics and Engineering

Published by Elsevier
Online ISSN: 0045-7825
Publications
Article
This paper describes an algorithm to extract adaptive and quality 3D meshes directly from volumetric imaging data. The extracted tetrahedral and hexahedral meshes are extensively used in the Finite Element Method (FEM). A top-down octree subdivision coupled with the dual contouring method is used to rapidly extract adaptive 3D finite element meshes with correct topology from volumetric imaging data. The edge contraction and smoothing methods are used to improve the mesh quality. The main contribution is extending the dual contouring method to crack-free interval volume 3D meshing with feature sensitive adaptation. Compared to other tetrahedral extraction methods from imaging data, our method generates adaptive and quality 3D meshes without introducing any hanging nodes. The algorithm has been successfully applied to constructing the geometric model of a biomolecule in finite element calculations.
 
Article
This paper describes an automatic and efficient approach to construct unstructured tetrahedral and hexahedral meshes for a composite domain made up of heterogeneous materials. The boundaries of these material regions form non-manifold surfaces. In earlier papers, we developed an octree-based isocontouring method to construct unstructured 3D meshes for a single-material (homogeneous) domain with manifold boundary. In this paper, we introduce the notion of a material change edge and use it to identify the interface between two or several different materials. A novel method to calculate the minimizer point for a cell shared by more than two materials is provided, which forms a non-manifold node on the boundary. We then mesh all the material regions simultaneously and automatically while conforming to their boundaries directly from volumetric data. Both material change edges and interior edges are analyzed to construct tetrahedral meshes, and interior grid points are analyzed for proper hexahedral mesh construction. Finally, edge-contraction and smoothing methods are used to improve the quality of tetrahedral meshes, and a combination of pillowing, geometric flow and optimization techniques is used for hexahedral mesh quality improvement. The shrink set of pillowing schemes is defined automatically as the boundary of each material region. Several application results of our multi-material mesh generation method are also provided.
 
Article
A three dimensional viscous finite element model is presented in this paper for the analysis of the acoustic fluid structure interaction systems including, but not limited to, the cochlear-based transducers. The model consists of a three dimensional viscous acoustic fluid medium interacting with a two dimensional flat structure domain. The fluid field is governed by the linearized Navier-Stokes equation with the fluid displacements and the pressure chosen as independent variables. The mixed displacement/pressure based formulation is used in the fluid field in order to alleviate the locking in the nearly incompressible fluid. The structure is modeled as a Mindlin plate with or without residual stress. The Hinton-Huang's 9-noded Lagrangian plate element is chosen in order to be compatible with 27/4 u/p fluid elements. The results from the full 3d FEM model are in good agreement with experimental results and other FEM results including Beltman's thin film viscoacoustic element [2] and two and half dimensional inviscid elements [21]. Although it is computationally expensive, it provides a benchmark solution for other numerical models or approximations to compare to besides experiments and it is capable of modeling any irregular geometries and material properties while other numerical models may not be applicable.
 
Article
This paper describes an algorithm to extract adaptive and quality quadrilateral/hexahedral meshes directly from volumetric data. First, a bottom-up surface topology preserving octree-based algorithm is applied to select a starting octree level. Then the dual contouring method is used to extract a preliminary uniform quad/hex mesh, which is decomposed into finer quads/hexes adaptively without introducing any hanging nodes. The positions of all boundary vertices are recalculated to approximate the boundary surface more accurately. Mesh adaptivity can be controlled by a feature sensitive error function, the regions that users are interested in, or finite element calculation results. Finally, a relaxation based technique is deployed to improve mesh quality. Several demonstration examples are provided from a wide variety of application domains. Some extracted meshes have been extensively used in finite element simulations.
 
Article
We present a variational approach to smooth molecular (proteins, nucleic acids) surface constructions, starting from atomic coordinates, as available from the protein and nucleic-acid data banks. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations traditionally used in understanding protein and nucleic-acid folding processes, are based on molecular force fields, and require smooth models of these molecular surfaces. To accelerate MD simulations, a popular methodology is to employ coarse grained molecular models, which represent clusters of atoms with similar physical properties by psuedo- atoms, resulting in coarser resolution molecular surfaces. We consider generation of these mixed-resolution or adaptive molecular surfaces. Our approach starts from deriving a general form second order geometric partial differential equation in the level-set formulation, by minimizing a first order energy functional which additionally includes a regularization term to minimize the occurrence of chemically infeasible molecular surface pockets or tunnel-like artifacts. To achieve even higher computational efficiency, a fast cubic B-spline C(2) interpolation algorithm is also utilized. A narrow band, tri-cubic B-spline level-set method is then used to provide C(2) smooth and resolution adaptive molecular surfaces.
 
Article
The vasculature consists of a complex network of vessels ranging from large arteries to arterioles, capillaries, venules, and veins. This network is vital for the supply of oxygen and nutrients to tissues and the removal of carbon dioxide and waste products from tissues. Because of its primary role as a pressure-driven chemomechanical transport system, it should not be surprising that mechanics plays a vital role in the development and maintenance of the normal vasculature as well as in the progression and treatment of vascular disease. This review highlights some past successes of vascular biomechanics, but emphasizes the need for research that synthesizes complementary advances in molecular biology, biomechanics, medical imaging, computational methods, and computing power for purposes of increasing our understanding of vascular physiology and pathophysiology as well as improving the design of medical devices and clinical interventions, including surgical procedures. That is, computational mechanics has great promise to contribute to the continued improvement of vascular health.
 
Article
Computational models for vascular growth and remodeling (G&R) are used to predict the long-term response of vessels to changes in pressure, flow, and other mechanical loading conditions. Accurate predictions of these responses are essential for understanding numerous disease processes. Such models require reliable inputs of numerous parameters, including material properties and growth rates, which are often experimentally derived, and inherently uncertain. While earlier methods have used a brute force approach, systematic uncertainty quantification in G&R models promises to provide much better information. In this work, we introduce an efficient framework for uncertainty quantification and optimal parameter selection, and illustrate it via several examples. First, an adaptive sparse grid stochastic collocation scheme is implemented in an established G&R solver to quantify parameter sensitivities, and near-linear scaling with the number of parameters is demonstrated. This non-intrusive and parallelizable algorithm is compared with standard sampling algorithms such as Monte-Carlo. Second, we determine optimal arterial wall material properties by applying robust optimization. We couple the G&R simulator with an adaptive sparse grid collocation approach and a derivative-free optimization algorithm. We show that an artery can achieve optimal homeostatic conditions over a range of alterations in pressure and flow; robustness of the solution is enforced by including uncertainty in loading conditions in the objective function. We then show that homeostatic intramural and wall shear stress is maintained for a wide range of material properties, though the time it takes to achieve this state varies. We also show that the intramural stress is robust and lies within 5% of its mean value for realistic variability of the material parameters. We observe that prestretch of elastin and collagen are most critical to maintaining homeostasis, while values of the material properties are most critical in determining response time. Finally, we outline several challenges to the G&R community for future work. We suggest that these tools provide the first systematic and efficient framework to quantify uncertainties and optimally identify G&R model parameters.
 
Article
Articular cartilage exhibits viscoelasticity in response to mechanical loading that is well described using biphasic or poroelastic continuum models. To date, boundary element methods (BEMs) have not been employed in modeling biphasic tissue mechanics. A three dimensional direct poroelastic BEM, formulated in the Laplace transform domain, is applied to modeling stress relaxation in cartilage. Macroscopic stress relaxation of a poroelastic cylinder in uni-axial confined compression is simulated and validated against a theoretical solution. Microscopic cell deformation due to poroelastic stress relaxation is also modeled. An extended Laplace inversion method is employed to accurately represent mechanical responses in the time domain.
 
Illustration of various 1st order CAG elements [2]. The circles define the positions of the support points of the assumed gradient field. 
Phase space diagram of a harmonic oscillator illustrating r-RESPA resonances [17]. The oscillator is hit by a velocity change every half period. Instead of forming a closed orbit, the kicks lead to monotonous energy growth. Assume that the oscillator is represented by V fast with a very small time step. 
Domain of dependence and stability for a rectangular space-time grid in one dimension. 
Article
Asynchronous variational integration (AVI) is a tool which improves the numerical efficiency of explicit time stepping schemes when applied to finite element meshes with local spatial refinement. This is achieved by associating an individual time step length to each spatial domain. Furthermore, long-term stability is ensured by its variational structure. This article presents AVI in the context of finite elements based on a weakened weak form (W2) Liu (2009) [1], exemplified by continuous assumed gradient elements Wolff and Bucher (2011) [2]. The article presents the main ideas of the modified AVI, gives implementation notes and a recipe for estimating the critical time step.
 
Article
This article presents a novel approach to collision detection based on distance fields. A novel interpolation ensures stability of the distances in the vicinity of complex geometries. An assumed gradient formulation is introduced leading to a [Formula: see text]-continuous distance function. The gap function is re-expressed allowing penalty and Lagrange multiplier formulations. The article introduces a node-to-element integration for first order elements, but also discusses signed distances, partial updates, intermediate surfaces, mortar methods and higher order elements. The algorithm is fast, simple and robust for complex geometries and self contact. The computed tractions conserve linear and angular momentum even in infeasible contact. Numerical examples illustrate the new algorithm in three dimensions.
 
Article
In this paper, we develop a geometrically flexible technique for computational fluid–structure interaction (FSI). The motivating application is the simulation of tri-leaflet bioprosthetic heart valve function over the complete cardiac cycle. Due to the complex motion of the heart valve leaflets, the fluid domain undergoes large deformations, including changes of topology. The proposed method directly analyzes a spline-based surface representation of the structure by immersing it into a non-boundary-fitted discretization of the surrounding fluid domain. This places our method within an emerging class of computational techniques that aim to capture geometry on non-boundary-fitted analysis meshes. We introduce the term “immersogeometric analysis” to identify this paradigm.
 
Article
Many researchers have proposed the use of biomechanical models for high accuracy soft organ non-rigid image registration, but one main problem in using comprehensive models is the long computation time required to obtain the solution. In this paper we propose to use the Total Lagrangian formulation of the Finite Element method together with Dynamic Relaxation for computing intra-operative organ deformations. We study the best ways of estimating the parameters involved and we propose a termination criteria that can be used in order to obtain fast results with prescribed accuracy. The simulation results prove the accuracy and computational efficiency of the method, even in cases involving large deformations, nonlinear materials and contacts.
 
Article
A multiscale procedure to couple a mesoscale discrete particle model and a macroscale continuum model of incompressible fluid flow is proposed in this study. We call this procedure the mesoscopic bridging scale (MBS) method since it is developed on the basis of the bridging scale method for coupling molecular dynamics and finite element models [G.J. Wagner, W.K. Liu, Coupling of atomistic and continuum simulations using a bridging scale decomposition, J. Comput. Phys. 190 (2003) 249-274]. We derive the governing equations of the MBS method and show that the differential equations of motion of the mesoscale discrete particle model and finite element (FE) model are only coupled through the force terms. Based on this coupling, we express the finite element equations which rely on the Navier-Stokes and continuity equations, in a way that the internal nodal FE forces are evaluated using viscous stresses from the mesoscale model. The dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) method for the discrete particle mesoscale model is employed. The entire fluid domain is divided into a local domain and a global domain. Fluid flow in the local domain is modeled with both DPD and FE method, while fluid flow in the global domain is modeled by the FE method only. The MBS method is suitable for modeling complex (colloidal) fluid flows, where continuum methods are sufficiently accurate only in the large fluid domain, while small, local regions of particular interest require detailed modeling by mesoscopic discrete particles. Solved examples - simple Poiseuille and driven cavity flows illustrate the applicability of the proposed MBS method.
 
Article
It is now well known that altered hemodynamics can alter the genes that are expressed by diverse vascular cells, which in turn plays a critical role in the ability of a blood vessel to adapt to new biomechanical conditions and governs the natural history of the progression of many types of disease. Fortunately, when taken together, recent advances in molecular and cell biology, in vivo medical imaging, biomechanics, computational mechanics, and computing power provide an unprecedented opportunity to begin to understand such hemodynamic effects on vascular biology, physiology, and pathophysiology. Moreover, with increased understanding will come the promise of improved designs for medical devices and clinical interventions. The goal of this paper, therefore, is to present a new computational framework that brings together recent advances in computational biosolid and biofluid mechanics that can exploit new information on the biology of vascular growth and remodeling as well as in vivo patient-specific medical imaging so as to enable realistic simulations of vascular adaptations, disease progression, and clinical intervention.
 
Article
We propose in this paper a reduced order modelling technique based on domain partitioning for parametric problems of fracture. We show that coupling domain decomposition and projection-based model order reduction permits to focus the numerical effort where it is most needed: around the zones where damage propagates. No a priori knowledge of the damage pattern is required, the extraction of the corresponding spatial regions being based solely on algebra. The efficiency of the proposed approach is demonstrated numerically with an example relevant to engineering fracture.
 
Article
Application of biomechanical modeling techniques in the area of medical image analysis and surgical simulation implies two conflicting requirements: accurate results and high solution speeds. Accurate results can be obtained only by using appropriate models and solution algorithms. In our previous papers we have presented algorithms and solution methods for performing accurate nonlinear finite element analysis of brain shift (which includes mixed mesh, different non-linear material models, finite deformations and brain-skull contacts) in less than a minute on a personal computer for models having up to 50.000 degrees of freedom. In this paper we present an implementation of our algorithms on a Graphics Processing Unit (GPU) using the new NVIDIA Compute Unified Device Architecture (CUDA) which leads to more than 20 times increase in the computation speed. This makes possible the use of meshes with more elements, which better represent the geometry, are easier to generate, and provide more accurate results.
 
Article
This paper presents the formulation and implementation of an Error in Constitutive Equations (ECE) method suitable for large-scale inverse identification of linear elastic material properties in the context of steady-state elastodynamics. In ECE-based methods, the inverse problem is postulated as an optimization problem in which the cost functional measures the discrepancy in the constitutive equations that connect kinematically admissible strains and dynamically admissible stresses. Furthermore, in a more recent modality of this methodology introduced by Feissel and Allix (2007), referred to as the Modified ECE (MECE), the measured data is incorporated into the formulation as a quadratic penalty term. We show that a simple and efficient continuation scheme for the penalty term, suggested by the theory of quadratic penalty methods, can significantly accelerate the convergence of the MECE algorithm. Furthermore, a (block) successive over-relaxation (SOR) technique is introduced, enabling the use of existing parallel finite element codes with minimal modification to solve the coupled system of equations that arises from the optimality conditions in MECE methods. Our numerical results demonstrate that the proposed methodology can successfully reconstruct the spatial distribution of elastic material parameters from partial and noisy measurements in as few as ten iterations in a 2D example and fifty in a 3D example. We show (through numerical experiments) that the proposed continuation scheme can improve the rate of convergence of MECE methods by at least an order of magnitude versus the alternative of using a fixed penalty parameter. Furthermore, the proposed block SOR strategy coupled with existing parallel solvers produces a computationally efficient MECE method that can be used for large scale materials identification problems, as demonstrated on a 3D example involving about 400,000 unknown moduli. Finally, our numerical results suggest that the proposed MECE approach can be significantly faster than the conventional approach of L(2) minimization using quasi-Newton methods.
 
Article
We present a method to solve a convection-reaction system based on a least-squares finite element method (LSFEM). For steady-state computations, issues related to recirculation flow are stated and demonstrated with a simple example. The method can compute concentration profiles in open flow even when the generation term is small. This is the case for estimating hemolysis in blood. Time-dependent flows are computed with the space-time LSFEM discretization. We observe that the computed hemoglobin concentration can become negative in certain regions of the flow; it is a physically unacceptable result. To prevent this, we propose a quadratic transformation of variables. The transformed governing equation can be solved in a straightforward way by LSFEM with no sign of unphysical behavior. The effect of localized high shear on blood damage is shown in a circular Couette-flow-with-blade configuration, and a physiological condition is tested in an arterial graft flow.
 
Illustrative concepts of conforming mesh and non-conforming mesh.
An illustration of the indicator field.
Parallel algorithm efficiency test.
3-D sphere dropping in a free fall in a channel at different time steps.
Article
In this paper, we develop a "modified" immersed finite element method (mIFEM), a non-boundary-fitted numerical technique, to study fluid-structure interactions. Using this method, we can more precisely capture the solid dynamics by solving the solid governing equation instead of imposing it based on the fluid velocity field as in the original immersed finite element (IFEM). Using the IFEM may lead to severe solid mesh distortion because the solid deformation is been over-estimated, especially for high Reynolds number flows. In the mIFEM, the solid dynamics is solved using appropriate boundary conditions generated from the surrounding fluid, therefore produces more accurate and realistic coupled solutions. We show several 2-D and 3-D testing cases where the mIFEM has a noticeable advantage in handling complicated fluid-structure interactions when the solid behavior dominates the fluid flow.
 
Article
We have recently developed and tested an efficient algorithm for solving the nonlinear inverse elasticity problem for a compressible hyperelastic material. The data for this problem are the quasi-static deformation fields within the solid measured at two distinct overall strain levels. The main ingredients of our algorithm are a gradient based quasi-Newton minimization strategy, the use of adjoint equations and a novel strategy for continuation in the material parameters. In this paper we present several extensions to this algorithm. First, we extend it to incompressible media thereby extending its applicability to tissues which are nearly incompressible under slow deformation. We achieve this by solving the forward problem using a residual-based, stabilized, mixed finite element formulation which circumvents the Ladyzenskaya-Babuska-Brezzi condition. Second, we demonstrate how the recovery of the spatial distribution of the nonlinear parameter can be improved either by preconditioning the system of equations for the material parameters, or by splitting the problem into two distinct steps. Finally, we present a new strain energy density function with an exponential stress-strain behavior that yields a deviatoric stress tensor, thereby simplifying the interpretation of pressure when compared with other exponential functions. We test the overall approach by solving for the spatial distribution of material parameters from noisy, synthetic deformation fields.
 
Schematic of the shear plane wave example for an arbitrary frequency
Article
An approach for efficient and accurate finite element analysis of harmonically excited soft solids using high-order spectral finite elements is presented and evaluated. The Helmholtz-type equations used to model such systems suffer from additional numerical error known as pollution when excitation frequency becomes high relative to stiffness (i.e. high wave number), which is the case, for example, for soft tissues subject to ultrasound excitations. The use of high-order polynomial elements allows for a reduction in this pollution error, but requires additional consideration to counteract Runge's phenomenon and/or poor linear system conditioning, which has led to the use of spectral element approaches. This work examines in detail the computational benefits and practical applicability of high-order spectral elements for such problems. The spectral elements examined are tensor product elements (i.e. quad or brick elements) of high-order Lagrangian polynomials with non-uniformly distributed Gauss-Lobatto-Legendre nodal points. A shear plane wave example is presented to show the dependence of the accuracy and computational expense of high-order elements on wave number. Then, a convergence study for a viscoelastic acoustic-structure interaction finite element model of an actual ultrasound driven vibroacoustic experiment is shown. The number of degrees of freedom required for a given accuracy level was found to consistently decrease with increasing element order. However, the computationally optimal element order was found to strongly depend on the wave number.
 
Article
This study presents the optimization of the maintenance scheduling of mechanical components under fatigue loading. The cracks of damaged structures may be detected during non-destructive inspection and subsequently repaired. Fatigue crack initiation and growth show inherent variability, and as well the outcome of inspection activities. The problem is addressed under the framework of reliability based optimization. The initiation and propagation of fatigue cracks are efficiently modeled using cohesive zone elements. The applicability of the method is demonstrated by a numerical example, which involves a plate with two holes subject to alternating stress.
 
Article
Predicting the outcome of thermotherapies in cancer treatment requires an accurate characterization of the bioheat transfer processes in soft tissues. Due to the biological and structural complexity of tumor (soft tissue) composition and vasculature, it is often very difficult to obtain reliable tissue properties that is one of the key factors for the accurate treatment outcome prediction. Efficient algorithms employing in vivo thermal measurements to determine heterogeneous thermal tissues properties in conjunction with a detailed sensitivity analysis can produce essential information for model development and optimal control. The goals of this paper are to present a general formulation of the bioheat transfer equation for heterogeneous soft tissues, review models and algorithms developed for cell damage, heat shock proteins, and soft tissues with nanoparticle inclusion, and demonstrate an overall computational strategy for developing a laser treatment framework with the ability to perform real-time robust calibrations and optimal control. This computational strategy can be applied to other thermotherapies using the heat source such as radio frequency or high intensity focused ultrasound.
 
Article
For chemical systems involving both fast and slow scales, stiffness presents challenges for efficient stochastic simulation. Two different avenues have been explored to solve this problem. One is the slow-scale stochastic simulation (ssSSA) based on the stochastic partial equilibrium assumption. The other is the tau-leaping method. In this paper we propose a new algorithm, the slow-scale tau-leaping method, which combines some of the best features of these two methods. Numerical experiments are presented which illustrate the effectiveness of this approach.
 
Article
Numerical simulation of flow past airfoils is important in the aerodynamic design of aircraft wings and turbomachinery components. These lifting devices often attain optimum performance at the condition of onset of separation. Therefore, separation phenomena must be included if the analysis is aimed at practical applications. Consequently, in the present study, numerical simulation of steady flow in a linear cascade of NACA 0012 airfoils is accomplished with control volume approach. The flow field is determined by solving two-dimensional incompressible Navier-Stokes equations while the effects of turbulence are accounted for by the k-ϵ model. Boundary layer developed at the suction and the pressure surfaces of the airfoil is investigated together with relevant pressure contours for different angles of attack and solidity. Separation point at the airfoil surface is predicted at high angles of attack. Pressure, lift and drag coefficients are computed and the results are compared with the predictions of isolated single NACA 0012 airfoil as well as the data available in the literature. However, the leading edge rotation is also introduced to determine the effect of leading edge rotation on stall inception of isolated airfoil. It is found that increase in solidity increases the angle of attack at which separation occurs and pressure, lift and drag coefficients are highly influenced by the angle of attack and the solidity. The results of leading edge rotation indicates that the drag coefficient reduces considerably while the lift coefficient increases.
 
Article
Computations for two-dimensional flow past a stationary NACA 0012 airfoil are carried out with progressively increasing and decreasing angles of attack. The incompressible, Reynolds averaged Navier–Stokes equations in conjunction with the Baldwin–Lomax model, for turbulence closure, are solved using stabilized finite element formulations. Beyond a certain angle of attack the flow stalls with a sudden loss of lift and increase in drag. Hysteresis in the aerodynamic coefficients is observed for a small range of angles of attack close to the stall angle. This is caused by the difference in the location of the separation point of the flow on the upper surface of the airfoil during the increasing and decreasing angles of attack. With the increasing angle, the separation point moves gradually towards the leading edge. With the decreasing angle, the movement of the separation point away from the leading edge is abrupt.
 
Article
In this study, a numerical computation of the flow field around a cascade of NACA 0012 airfoils is carried out. The numerical scheme, using the control volume method, is introduced to solve the governing flow equations. The κ-ε model is employed to take into account the turbulence effects. The grids are generated employing algebraic equations for the boundary point distribution while the Laplace grid generator is employed for the internal point distribution. The trailing edge separation at different angles of attack for solidity ratios and staggers is predicted and the resulting pressure, lift and drag coefficients are computed. It is found that solidity increases the incidence at which maximum lift is obtained and, in this case, a slight increase in drag occurs.
 
Article
The equivalence between stabilized finite element methods (or Galerkin-least-squares tyoe methods, Ga.l.s.) and the standard Galerkin method with bubble functions is established in an abstract framework. The results are applicable to various finite element spaces, including high order elements, and applications to the advective diffusive model and to the Stokes problem are presented, illustrating the potential of the abstract theory introduced here.
 
Article
Based upon a modified Hellinger-Reissner principle, a new four-node hybrid stress element is proposed for the linear elastic analysis of laminated orthotropic or anisotropic plates and shells. A constrained initial stress trial is introduced so that equilibrium constraints can be relaxed by the variational principle. Thus the complicated work of selecting an equilibrating stress field can be avoided. The example problems illustrate the performance of the element which is seen to be reliable and efficient.
 
Article
This paper provides a comprehensive survey of the most popular constraint-handling techniques currently used with evolutionary algorithms. We review approaches that go from simple variations of a penalty function, to others, more sophisticated, that are biologically inspired on emulations of the immune system, culture or ant colonies. Besides describing briefly each of these approaches (or groups of techniques), we provide some criticism regarding their highlights and drawbacks. A small comparative study is also conducted, in order to assess the performance of several penalty-based approaches with respect to a dominance-based technique proposed by the author, and with respect to some mathematical programming approaches. Finally, we provide some guidelines regarding how to select the most appropriate constraint-handling technique for a certain application, and we conclude with some of the most promising paths of future research in this area.
 
Article
A procedure is presented to improve the quality of surface meshes while maintaining the essential characteristics of the discrete surface. The surface characteristics are preserved by repositioning mesh vertices in a series of element-based local parametric spaces such that the vertices remain on the original discrete surface. The movement of the mesh vertices is driven by a non-linear numerical optimization process. Two optimization approaches are described, one which improves the quality of elements as much as possible and the other which improves element quality but also keeps the new mesh as close as possible to the original mesh.
 
Article
This paper presents a substructure synthesis method (SSM) for non-linear analysis of multibody systems. The detailed derivation of the equation of motion which takes into account the geometric non-linear effects of large rotation undergoing small strain elastic deformation is presented. Using the substructure synthesis approach, the equation of motion of the systems can be simplified for rigid and flexible substructures. For the flexible substructure, the equation of motion is condensed through the boundary conditions at the interface between the flexible and rigid substructures. As a result, equations of motion for multi-flexible-body systems including the geometric non-linear effects of large rotation are derived. To demonstrate the applicability and accuracy of the proposed approach, an example of a two-link manipulator was chosen for this presentation. The results using the linear and non-linear models are presented to highlight the effects of geometric non-linearities.
 
Article
The variational formulation and computational aspects of a three-dimensional finite-strain rod model, considered in Part I, are presented. A particular parametrization is employed that bypasses the singularity typically associated with the use of Euler angles. As in the classical Kirchhoff-Love model, rotations have the standard interpretation of orthogonal, generally noncommutative, transformations. This is in contrast with alternative formulations proposed by Argyris et al. [5–8], based on the notion of semitangential rotation. Emphasis is placed on a geometric approach, which proves essential in the formulation of algorithms. In particular, the configuration update procedure becomes the algorithmic counterpart of the exponential map. The computational implementation relies on the formula for the exponential of a skew-symmetric matrix. Consistent linearization procedures are employed to obtain linearized weak forms of the balance equations. The geometric stiffness then becomes generally nonsymmetric as a result of the non-Euclidean character of the configuration space. However, complete symmetry is recovered at an equilibrium configuration, provided that the loading is conservative. An explicit condition for this to be the case is obtained. Numerical simulations including postbuckling behavior and nonconservative loading are also presented. Details pertaining to the implementation of the present formulation are also discussed.
 
Article
The manuscript presents a novel model reduction approach for periodic heterogeneous media, which combines the multiple scale asymptotic (MSA) expansion method with the transformation field analysis (TFA) to reduce the computational cost of a direct homogenization approach without significantly compromising on solution accuracy. The evolution of failure in micro-phases and interfaces is modeled using eigendeformation. Adaptive model improvement strategy incorporating a hierarchical sequence of computational homogenization models is employed to control the accuracy of the model. We present the model formulation and the computational details along with verification (with respect to direct homogenization) and validation (with respect to physical experiments) studies.
 
Article
We present an application of reduced basis method for Stokes equations in domains with affine parametric dependence. The essential components of the method are (i) the rapid convergence of global reduced basis approximations – Galerkin projection onto a space WN spanned by solutions of the governing partial differential equation at N selected points in parameter space; (ii) the off-line/on-line computational procedures decoupling the generation and projection stages of the approximation process.The operation count for the on-line stage – in which, given a new parameter value, we calculate an output of interest – depends only on N (typically very small) and the parametric complexity of the problem; the method is thus ideally suited for the repeated and rapid evaluations required in the context of parameter estimation, design, optimization, and real-time control. Particular attention is given (i) to the pressure treatment of incompressible Stokes problem; (ii) to find an equivalent inf–sup condition that guarantees stability of reduced basis solutions by enriching the reduced basis velocity approximation space with the solutions of a supremizer problem; (iii) to provide algebraic stability of the problem by reducing the condition number of reduced basis matrices using an orthonormalization procedure applied to basis functions; (iv) to reduce computational costs in order to allow real-time solution of parametrized problem.
 
Article
Meshless approximations based on moving least-squares, kernels, and partitions of unity are examined. It is shown that the three methods are in most cases identical except for the important fact that partitions of unity enable p-adaptivity to be achieved. Methods for constructing discontinuous approximations and approximations with discontinuous derivatives are also described. Next, several issues in implementation are reviewed: discretization (collocation and Galerkin), quadrature in Galerkin and fast ways of constructing consistent moving least-square approximations. The paper concludes with some sample calculations.
 
Article
A globally conservative Galerkin/least-squares formulation which attains correct shock structure is developed for any choice of variables. Only the choice of entropy variables satisfies exactly the discrete Clausius-Duhem inequality without any dissipative mechanisms, whereas for the rest of the variables, artificial diffusion is required to guarantee entropy production. The limit of the formulation is well defined for entropy variables and the primitive variables (p, u, T), leading to conservative incompressible formulations. The approach is stable for any continuous interpolations, both for compressible and incompressible flows. A comparative study of different variables is performed, indicating that entropy variables and the primitive variables (p, u, T) possess the most attributes for practical problem solving.
 
Article
The local and overall responses of nonlinear composites are classically investigated by the Finite Element Method. We propose an alternate method based on Fourier series which avoids meshing and which makes direct use of microstructure images. It is based on the exact expression of the Green function of a linear elastic and homogeneous comparison material. First, the case of elastic nonhomogeneous constituents is considered and an iterative procedure is proposed to solve the Lippman-Schwinger equation which naturally arises in the problem. Then, the method is extended to non-linear constituents by a step-by-step integration in time. The accuracy of the method is assessed by varying the spatial resolution of the microstructures. The flexibility of the method allows it to serve for a large variety of microstructures.
 
Article
Modeling of highly advective transport is embarrassingly difficult, even in the superficially simple case of one-dimensional constant-velocity flow. In this paper, a fresh approach is taken, based on an explicit conservative control-volume formulation that makes use of a universal limiter for transient interpolation modeling of the advective transport equations. This ‘ULTIMATE’ conservative difference scheme is applied to unsteady, one-dimensional scalar pure advection at constant velocity, using three representative test profiles: a discontinuous step, an isolated sine-squared wave, and a semi-ellipse. The goal is to devise a single robust scheme which achieves sharp monotonic resolution of the step without corrupting the other profiles. The semi-ellipse is particularly challenging because of its combination of sudden and gradual changes in gradient. The ULTIMATE strategy can be applied to explicit conservative advection schemes of any order of accuracy. Second-order methods are shown to be unsatisfactory because of steepening and clipping typical of currently popular so-called ‘high resolution’ shock-capturing or TVD schemes. The ULTIMATE third-order upwind scheme is highly satisfactory for most flows of practical importance. Higher order methods give predictably better step resolution, although even-order schemes generate a (monotonic) waviness in the difficult semi-ellipse simulation. By using adaptive stencil expansion to introduce (in principle arbitrarily) higher order resolution locally in isolated regions of high curvature or high gradient, extremely accurate coarse-grid results can be obtained with very little additional cost above that of the base (third-order) scheme.
 
Article
Difference methods for the solution of the semiconductor flow-equations are discussed. It is shown that implicit schemes are best suited for the particular problem. The successive under-relaxation method (SUR) is appropriate for the solution of the implicit equations. Emphasis is placed on the discussion of the computer-code SECUNDA and its applications in a technical development project. Graphical output and computer animation are powerful resultevaluation techniques. Results for the MESFET and for Gunn diodes show the power and flexibility of the approach presented.
 
Article
This paper discusses modelling of the behaviour of structures reinforced by long fibre SiC/Ti composite material with a periodic microstructure. A new multiscale behaviour model based on a multilevel finite element (FE2) approach is used to take into account heterogeneities in the behaviour between the fibre and matrix. It is shown that combining this model with parallel computation techniques now makes it possible to consider realistic composite structural computations yielding a detailed geometric description and constitutive equations giving access to microstructural data, instead of only to phenomenological macroscopic data difficult to correlate with the local mechanical state.
 
Article
Many real-world search and optimization problems involve inequality and/or equality constraints and are thus posed as constrained optimization problems. In trying to solve constrained optimization problems using genetic algorithms (GAs) or classical optimization methods, penalty function methods have been the most popular approach, because of their simplicity and ease of implementation. However, since the penalty function approach is generic and applicable to any type of constraint (linear or nonlinear), their performance is not always satisfactory. Thus, researchers have developed sophisticated penalty functions specific to the problem at hand and the search algorithm used for optimization. However, the most difficult aspect of the penalty function approach is to find appropriate penalty parameters needed to guide the search towards the constrained optimum. In this paper, GA's population-based approach and ability to make pair-wise comparison in tournament selection operator are exploited to devise a penalty function approach that does not require any penalty parameter. Careful comparisons among feasible and infeasible solutions are made so as to provide a search direction towards the feasible region. Once sufficient feasible solutions are found, a niching method (along with a controlled mutation operator) is used to maintain diversity among feasible solutions. This allows a real-parameter GA's crossover operator to continuously find better feasible solutions, gradually leading the search near the true optimum solution. GAs with this constraint handling approach have been tested on nine problems commonly used in the literature, including an engineering design problem. In all cases, the proposed approach has been able to repeatedly find solutions closer to the true optimum solution than that reported earlier.
 
Article
A class of computational algorithms for multi-scale analyses is developed in this paper. The two-scale modeling scheme for the analysis of heterogeneous media with fine periodic microstructures is generalized by using relevant variational statements. Instead of the method of two-scale asymptotic expansion, the mathematical results on the generalized convergence are utilized in the two-scale variational descriptions. Accordingly, the global–local type computational schemes can be unified in association with the homogenization procedure for general nonlinear problems. After formulating the problem in linear elastostatics, that with local contact condition and the elastoplastic problem, we present representative numerical examples along with the computational algorithm consistent with our two-scale modeling strategy as well as some direct approaches.
 
Article
Recently there has been an increasing interest in time integrators for ordinary differential equations which use Lie group actions as a primitive in the design of the methods. These methods are usually phrased in an abstract sense for arbitrary Lie groups and actions. We show here how the methods look when applied to the rigid body equations in particular and indicate how the methods work in general. An important part of the Lie group methods involves the computation of a coordinate map and its derivative. Various options are available, and they vary in cost, accuracy and ability to approximately conserve invariants. We discuss how the computation of these maps can be optimized for the rigid body case, and we provide numerical experiments which give an idea of the performance of Lie group methods compared to other known integration schemes.
 
Article
In this paper we introduce and analyze a finite element method for elasticity problems with interfaces. The method allows for discontinuities, internal to the elements, in the approximation across the interface. We propose a general approach that can handle both perfectly and imperfectly bonded interfaces without modifications of the code. For the case of linear elasticity, we show that optimal order of convergence holds without restrictions on the location of the interface relative to the mesh. We present numerical examples for the linear case as well as for contact and crack propagation model problems.
 
Article
A reduced model for the effective behavior of nonlinear composites, such as metal–matrix composite materials, has been recently proposed by the authors [1]. It extends and improves on the Transformation Field Analysis of Dvorak [2] by considering nonuniform transformation strains, also called plastic modes, and is referred to as the Nonuniform Transformation Field Analysis. The present study is devoted to the implementation of this new homogenized model into a structural computation.A brief account on the reduction procedure is given first. Then the time-integration of the model which is required at each integration point of the structural problem is performed by means of an implicit scheme. Two examples are discussed. The response of the homogenized structure is compared to the “exact” response of the actual heterogeneous structure computed with a very fine mesh. It is seen that not only the structural response is accurately captured by the NTFA model, but also the local stress field is correctly approximated.
 
Article
In this paper, an improved inf–sup condition is derived for a class of discontinuous Galerkin methods for solving the steady-state incompressible Stokes and Navier–Stokes equations. The computational domain is subdivided into subdomains with non-matching meshes at the interfaces. Optimal error estimates are obtained. Numerical experiments including two benchmark problems are presented.
 
Article
In turbulence applications, strongly imposed no-slip conditions often lead to inaccurate mean flow quantities for coarse boundary-layer meshes. To circumvent this shortcoming, weakly imposed Dirichlet boundary conditions for fluid dynamics were recently introduced in [Y. Bazilevs, T.J.R. Hughes, Weak imposition of Dirichlet boundary conditions in fluid mechanics, Comput. Fluids 36 (2007) 12–26]. In the present work, we propose a modification of the original weak boundary condition formulation that consistently incorporates the well-known “law of the wall”. To compare the different methods, we conduct numerical experiments for turbulent channel flow at Reynolds number 395 and 950. In the limit of vanishing mesh size in the wall-normal direction, the weak boundary condition acts like a strong boundary condition. Accordingly, strong and weak boundary conditions give essentially identical results on meshes that are stretched to better capture boundary layers. However, on uniform meshes that are incapable of resolving boundary layers, weakly imposed boundary conditions deliver significantly more accurate mean flow quantities than their strong counterparts. Hence, weakly imposed boundary conditions present a robust technique for flows of industrial interest, where optimal mesh design is usually not feasible and resolving boundary layers is prohibitively expensive. Our numerical results show that the formulation that incorporates the law of the wall yields an improvement over the original method.
 
Article
The immersed boundary (IB) method is both a mathematical formulation and a numerical method for fluid–structure interaction problems, in which immersed incompressible visco-elastic bodies or boundaries interact with an incompressible fluid. Previous formulations of the IB method were not able to treat appropriately immersed materials of finite, nonzero thickness modeled by general hyper-elastic constitutive laws because of the lack of appropriate transmission conditions between the immersed body and the surrounding fluid in the case of a nonzero jump in normal stress at the solid–fluid interface. (Such a jump does not arise when the solid is comprised of fibers that run parallel to the interface, but typically does arise in other cases, e.g., when the solid contains elastic fibers that terminate at the solid–fluid interface). We present a derivation of the IB method that takes into account in an appropriate way the missing term. The derivation presented in this paper starts from a separation of the stress that appears in the principle of virtual work. The stress is divided into its fluid-like and solid-like components, and each of these two terms is treated in its natural framework, i.e., the Eulerian framework for the fluid-like stress and the Lagrangian framework for the solid-like stress. We describe how the IB method can be used in conjunction with standard formulations of continuum mechanics models for immersed incompressible elastic materials and present some illustrative numerical experiments.
 
Top-cited authors
Thomas J.R. Hughes
  • University of Texas at Austin
Yuri Bazilevs
  • University of California, San Diego
J. T. Oden
  • University of Texas at Austin
Wing Kam Liu
  • Northwestern University
Noboru Kikuchi
  • University of Michigan, Toyota Central R&D Labs