CA A Cancer Journal for Clinicians

Published by Wiley
Online ISSN: 1542-4863
Publications
Article
Each year, the American Cancer Society (ACS) publishes a summary of its recommendations for early cancer detection, including guideline updates, emerging issues that are relevant to screening for cancer, and a summary of the most current data on cancer screening rates for US adults. In 2006, there were no updates to ACS guidelines for early cancer detection. In this issue of the journal, we describe criteria for successful screening, discuss recent evidence and policy changes that have implications for cancer screening, summarize the ACS guidelines and describe guidelines reviews that are underway, and provide an update of the most recent data pertaining to participation rates in cancer screening from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's (CDC's) Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) and the National Health Interview Survey (NHIS).
 
Article
Each January, the American Cancer Society (ACS) publishes a summary of its recommendations for early cancer detection, including guideline updates, emerging issues that are relevant to screening for cancer, and a summary of the most current data on cancer screening rates for US adults. In 2005, there were no updates to ACS guidelines. In this issue of the journal, we summarize the guidelines, discuss recent evidence and policy changes that have implications for cancer screening, and provide an update of the most recent data pertaining to participation rates in cancer screening by age, sex, and insurance status from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System.
 
Article
Each year, the American Cancer Society (ACS) publishes a report summarizing its recommendations for early cancer detection, data and trends in cancer screening rates, and select issues related to cancer screening. In 2008, the ACS, the American Gastroenterological Association, the American College of Gastroenterology, the Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy, and the American College of Radiology issued a joint update of guidelines for colorectal cancer screening in average-risk adults. In this issue, the current ACS guidelines and recent issues are summarized, updates of testing guidelines for early prostate cancer detection and colorectal cancer screening by the United States Preventive Services Task Force are discussed, and the most recent data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System and the National Health Interview Survey pertaining to participation rates in cancer screening are described.
 
Article
The majority of cancer incidence and mortality occurs in individuals aged older than 65 years, and the number of older adults with cancer is projected to significantly increase secondary to the aging of the US population. As such, understanding the changes accompanying age in the context of the cancer patient is of critical importance. Age-related changes can impact tolerance of anticancer therapy and can shift the overall risk-benefit ratio of such treatment. A challenge in implementing evidence-based approaches in older adults is the under-representation of this group in oncology clinical trials. In addition, although older adults are particularly vulnerable to the side effects of cancer therapy, few oncology studies to date have incorporated a measure of health status other than the Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group or Karnofsky performance scales. Novel metrics such as frailty indices or the geriatric assessment recognize heterogeneity among older adults, and may allow for risk-adapted approaches to therapy. It is increasingly recognized that several laboratory markers may predict morbidity and mortality in older adults; these biologic variables may further aid in stratifying this group of patients based on risk. This review describes key studies from the geriatric literature that provide principles for assessing health status in the older patient, and ways that these principles can be applied to oncology care in an older population are proposed.
 
Article
Environmental 131I contamination from atmospheric nuclear bomb tests conducted at the NTS from 1951 to 1958 exposed Americans nationwide to a cumulative average dose of 1 to 4 rad to the thyroid gland. By comparison, 10 years of exposure to natural background sources of thyroid radiation results in a cumulative dose of 1 rad. Americans living in certain high-deposition areas received an average cumulative thyroid dose of as much as 16 rad. Individual dose rates vary considerably as a function of age at the time of exposure, site of residence, and dietary habits with respect to milk consumption. The individual cumulative thyroid dose for persons born between 1945 and 1958 may be significantly higher than the reported averages for their locale. The NCI report contains voluminous data tables permitting detailed calculations of individual dose. Additionally, color-coded dose maps allow one to approximate individual dose conveniently. Translation of cumulative thyroid dose attributable to 131I to predictions of increased rates of thyroid cancer appears problematic and is the subject of further study. In contrast to studies of patients receiving external thyroid irradiation, existing studies of patients treated with 131I for diagnostic and therapeutic medical purposes do not document increased rates of thyroid cancer. An Institute of Medicine task force is expected to issue a report on this subject in September 1998. This review also briefly summarizes the evaluation, diagnosis, and treatment of patients with papillary and follicular thyroid cancers. Data from 53,856 patients with thyroid cancer accessioned to the NCDB from 1985 to 1995 document extremely high survival rates for patients in the United States with papillary and follicular thyroid cancer.
 
Article
Scintigraphy with 131I-MIBG has located most pheochromocytomas. The detected tumors have been intra-adrenal, extra-adrenal, malignant, and familial in type. The method is safe, but requires images taken over three days to attain optimal results. Because of its ability to screen all sites where primary pheochromocytomas may reside, scintigraphy should be employed as the initial procedure in the search for these tumors. It may be the only technique that will locate extra-adrenal pheochromocytomas. The rate of false-negative results is about 10 percent; therefore, other techniques such as computed tomography will be necessary to help find the few elusive pheochromocytomas.
 
Article
Information was gathered on the smoking habits of 187,783 white men between the ages of 50 and 69 between January 1 and May 31, 1952. The men were subsequently traced through October 31, 1955. 11,870 men died during this period. The total experience covered 667,753 man years. For microscopically proved cases of cancer and for the total cases reported as cancer it was found that the death rates were higher among regular cigarette smokers than among men who never smoked, that the mortality ratio increased with the number of cigarettes smoked each day, and that the death rates were higher among pipe and cigar smokers than among men who never smoked. 7316 deaths occurred among regular cigarette smokers; this was an excess of 2665 over the 4651 deaths that would have occurred had the age-specific death rates for smokers been equal to that for nonsmokers. Coronary disease accounted for 52.1% of the excess; lung cancer accounted for 13.5% of the excess; and cancer of other sites accounted for 13.5% of the excess. An extremely high association between cigarette smoking and death rates for men with lung cancer was found in both rural areas and large cities. Only 338 deaths were ascribed to pulmonary diseases other than lung cancer. Only 1120 (9.4%) of the 11,870 deaths were attributed to diseases other than cancer, cardiac, circulatory, and pulmonary diseases and accidents, violence, and suicide. Only 3 of the specific disease entities - gastric and duodenal ulcers and cirrhosis of the liver - showed a statistically significant degree of association with smoking habits. The most important finding of this study was the high degree of association between cigarette smoking and the total death rate.
 
Article
Many studies demonstrate that cancer incidence and mortality patterns among Asian Americans are heterogeneous, but national statistics on cancer for Asian ethnic groups are not routinely available. This article summarizes data on cancer incidence, mortality, risk factors, and screening for 5 of the largest Asian American ethnic groups in California. California has the largest Asian American population of any state and makes special efforts to collect health information for ethnic minority populations. We restricted our analysis to the 4 most common cancers (prostate, breast, lung, colon/rectum) and for the 3 sites known to be more common in Asian Americans (stomach, liver, cervix). Cancer incidence and mortality were summarized for 5 Asian American ethnic groups in California in order of population size (Chinese, Filipino, Vietnamese, Korean, and Japanese). Chinese Americans had among the lowest incidence and death rate from all cancer combined; however, Chinese women had the highest lung cancer death rate. Filipinos had the highest incidence and death rate from prostate cancer and the highest death rate from female breast cancer. Vietnamese had among the highest incidence and death rates from liver, lung, and cervical cancer. Korean men and women had by far the highest incidence and mortality rates from stomach cancer. Japanese experienced the highest incidence and death rates from colorectal cancer and among the highest death rates from breast and prostate cancer. Variations in cancer risk factors were also observed and were for the most part consistent with variations in cancer incidence and mortality. Differences in cancer burden among Asian American ethnic groups should be considered in the clinical setting and in cancer control planning.
 
Article
In the United States, cancers of the oral cavity and oropharynx represent approximately three percent of all malignancies in men and two percent of all malignancies in women. The American Cancer Society estimates that 28,900 new cases of oral cancer will be diagnosed in 2002, and nearly 7,400 people will die from this disease. Over 90 percent of these tumors are squamous cell carcinomas, which arise from the oral mucosal lining. In spite of the ready accessibility of the oral cavity to direct examination, these malignancies still are often not detected until a late stage, and the survival rate for oral cancer has remained essentially unchanged over the past three decades. The purpose of this article is to review the clinical features of oral cancer and premalignant oral lesions, with an emphasis on early detection.
 
Article
A questionnaire dealing with problems relating to carcinoma of the breast occurring in pregnancy has been submitted to a number of physicians considered to be well informed on this subject. The replies have been tabulated and analyzed. Some features of the disease as seen in pregnancy are discussed, and some of the factors responsible for its poor prognosis are considered. The response to the survey indicates that the results of the treatment of carcinoma of the breast occurring in pregnancy are very disappointing.
 
Article
Incidence, survival, and mortality data have all been used as measures of the overall progress being made in controlling cancer. Each of these measures, however, has significant limitations. The author suggests that a better indicator may be standardized rates of years of life lost, a measurement that reveals steady reductions in the cancer burden in the United States over the last 15 years.
 
Article
Overall, prostate cancer patients are being diagnosed earlier and treated more effectively than ever before in the United States. Unfortunately, care for African-American men with the disease has lagged behind. This article reports on the 1992 patient care evaluation study of prostate cancer by the American College of Surgeons Commission on Cancer.
 
Article
Cancer prevalence and mortality rates vary widely from region to region, and it is hoped that epidemiological studies can offer clues to better control of the disease. The authors discuss the distribution of cancer of the stomach, colon and rectum, lung, breast, uterine cervix, prostate and bladder, plus leukemia, identifying high and low risk populations and associated factors.
 
Article
Recent articles have focused attention on the 'alarming increase of cancer mortality in the U.S. black population'. This may be appropriate for black males, though it is certainly an exaggeration for black females where, overall, there has been little change. Clearly, however, for both males and females, controlling cancer is more difficult in blacks than in whites. Blacks are developing more cancers and their prospects for diagnosis in a localized stage are poorer. Survival rates are poorer, and death rates are higher.
 
Article
The estimates of the incidence of cancer are based upon data from the National Cancer Institute's Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) Program (1973-1976). Non-melanoma skin cancer and carcinoma in situ have not been included in the statistics. The incidence of non-melanoma skin cancer is estimated to be over 300,000. Prepared by Edwin Silverberg, Project Statistician, Department of Epidemiology and Statistics. American Cancer Society, New York, New York.
 
Article
The estimates of the incidence of cancer are based upon data from the National Cancer Institute's Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) Program (1973-1976). Non-melanoma skin cancer and carcinoma in situ have not been included in the statistics. The incidence of non-melanoma skin cancer is estimated to be over 400,000.
 
Top-cited authors
Ahmedin Jemal
  • American Cancer Society
Rebecca Siegel
  • American Cancer Society
Lindsey A. Torre
  • American Cancer Society
Freddie Bray
  • International Agency for Research on Cancer
Elizabeth Ward
  • University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign