Bulletin of the American Museum of Natural History

Online ISSN: 0003-0090
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Article
Laboratory studies and field observations were correlated to compose a complete description of breeding behavior in the leopard frog. The significance of various calls and their relationship to the sexual cycle and quantitative details of egg-laying behavior in 41 ovipositions were determined. Investigation of the sensory basis of reproductive behavior revealed that sex discrimination, which occurs during amplexus, is based upon the fact that an ovulated female is much fatter than a male or a non-ovulated female, and that non-ovulated females and males emit a warning croak when they are clasped, whereas the ovulated female is silent. The oviposition reflexes of the female are elicited by the tactile stimulation associated with the male's sexual clasp. The ejaculatory pumps of the male occur in response to tactile stimuli resulting from the egg-laying movements of the female. Pseudo-oviposition (egg-laying reflexes) was induced in gravid, non-ovulated females following interperitoneal injection of physiological saline solution which increased the female's girth and prevented the utterance of the warning croak. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved)
 
Article
To the extent now possible, I trace out what appear to be the adaptive changes involved in the origin of rodents. This requires, as a preliminary, a critical analysis of the existing evidence that bears on their phylogenetic relationship to other groups. Part of the paper provides such an analysis, from an unusual perspective. The evidence for a phylogenetic association of rodents and lagomorphs is weaker than is usually claimed but may nevertheless reflect reality. In particular, the precursors of rodents are not yet adequately identified. The initial adaptations of rodents were for the most part quite different from those of lagomorphs, despite their similar gnawing. There is evidence that the Myomorpha constitute the earliest diverging branch of extant rodents. Conapomorphy and spermativore are new terms.
 
Article
Chronostratigraphy and biochronology are the prime conceptual methods for relating biologic events to the geologic time scale. Chronostratigraphy is the dominant method applied in the oceanographic-marine realm, and biochronology is the dominant method for the terrestrial realm. These concepts were conceived in the early half of the 20th century, and major advances in both occurred during the latter half of the 20th century. Historical development of both chronostratigaphy and biochronology is briefly reviewed, and it is concluded that the early definition and application of biochronology is tainted by reference to and inference from biostratigraphy. It is proposed that biochronology be redefined as the organization of geologic time according to the irreversible process of organic evolution, following the characterization and application by Berggren and Van Couvering (1978, G.V. Cohee, M.F. Glaessner, and H.D. Hedberg [editors], Contributions to the geologic time scale: 39-55. Tulsa, OK: American Association of Petroleum Geologists). The new term "chronostratigraphic marker" is proposed and defined as any chronologically significant event (biologic, isotopic, isotopic-ratio, or paleomagnetic), recorded in a stratigraphic sequence, that can be directly related to and/or tied to any other chronostratigraphic marker. According to definitions given herein, a biochronologic event can become a chronostratigraphic marker, but only when tied to a discrete stratigraphic sequence and related to other stratigraphic sequences and/or chronostratigraphic markers. The terms and concepts "datum event", "land mammal age", "stage of evolution", and "appearance event ordination" are discussed and defined. A datum event is defined as any chronostratigraphic marker. Land mammal ages, along with European Neogene and Paleogene mammal units, are considered biochronologic entities; they are defined as relatively short intervals of geologic time that can be recognized and distinguished from earlier and later such units (in a given region or province) by a characterizing assemblage of mammals. Stage of evolution is a very basic biochronologic concept defined as the chronologic ordering of faunal assemblages based on morphological (evolutionary) differences observed in members of a single, well-established phyletic lineage. Appearance event ordination is a new tool of biochronology. It is defined as ordering the appearance of fossil mammal genera by multivariate analysis, using overlapping (conjunctive) and nonoverlapping (disjunctive) range distributions in large sets of data.
 
Article
"Issued May 5, 1958"--T.p. verso. Thesis (Ph. D.)--Columbia University. Includes bibliographical references (p. 210-214).
 
Article
Title from caption. At head of title: Article 10. Date of publication: Oct. 3, 1922. Cf. introd. text to v. 46. Thesis (Ph. D.)--Columbia University. Includes bibliographical references (p. 601-603).
 
Article
Typewritten. Thesis (A.M.)--Cornell University, 1923. Bibliography: p. 205-218.
 
Article
"Issued March 24, 1950"--T.p. verso. Originally presented as the author's Thesis (Ph. D.)--Columbia University. Includes bibliographical references (p. 559-561).
 
Article
Thesis (Ph. D.) - Cornell University, June 1949.
 
Article
Phylogenetic analyses based on morphological data support monophyly of Glires, but not a link between Glires and zalambdalestids. Glires are more closely related to several Tertiary taxa, including primates, leptictids, pseudictopids, anagalids, and macroscelideans. Phyloge- netically constrained distributions of Glires support the conventional view for a post K-T boundary radiation of modern orders of placental mammals and disagree with conclusions of some molecular studies that divergence of Rodentia and Lagomorpha at infraordinal, ordinal, and certain supraordinal levels occurred in the Cretaceous. Current hypotheses employed to explain the discrepancy between the fossil record and the molecular clock hypothesis are not supported by phylogenetic and distributional evidence of Glires. There is no compelling evi- dence that close relatives of Glires were present in the Cretaceous.
 
Article
Thesis (Ph.D.)--Cornell University, Jan., 2005. Includes bibliographical references.
 
Article
Reprint from the Bulletin of the American Museum of Natural History, vol. lxv. Submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy, in the Faculty of Pure Science, Columbia University.
 
Article
Thesis--Columbia University. Bibliography: p. 357-358.
 
Article
Thesis--Princeton University.
 
Article
"A dissertation submitted to the Graduate Faculty in Biology ... " Thesis (Ph. D.) -- City University of New York, 1983. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 175-214).
 
Article
Thesis (Ph. D.)--University of Kansas, Zoology, 1971.
 
Article
Thesis, Columbia University. Bibliography: leaves 275-282.
 
Article
Thesis--Columbia University. Bibliography: p. 559-562.
 
Article
Studies of fossil remains of age-diagnostic land mammals have allowed recognition of assemblages of late Uintan, early and late Arikareean, and early Hemingfordian (late middle Eocene, early Oligocene to early Miocene) age in the Sespe Formation and equivalent marine formations of the northern Peninsular Ranges Provinces and western Transverse Ranges in Los Angeles, Orange, Santa Barbara, and Ventura counties, southern California. Recent fossil recovery efforts have resulted in the recognition of new land mammal assemblages in the Santa Ana Mountains and San Joaquin Hills of Orange County, the Santa Monica Mountains of Los Angeles County, and Simi Valley, Ventura County. The late Arikareean fauna appears to represent a new assemblage that has not been recognized previously in the fossil land mammal record of southern California. The presence of a late Uintan assemblage near the base of the undifferentiated Sespe and Vaqueros formations (S/V) in the northern Santa Ana Mountains of Orange County suggests that the base of the unit is similar in age to the base of the Sespe Formation in the Simi Valley area. The top of the S/V in the northern Santa Ana Mountains and San Joaquin Hills of Orange County and in the Santa Monica Mountains of Los Angeles County is approximately 10.4 million years younger than the top the Sespe Formation in the Simi Valley area, at South Mountain, and along Oak Ridge in Ventura County. In the northern Santa Ana Mountains and the Santa Monica Mountains, early Hemingfordian land mammal assemblages occur stratigraphically below late Hemingfordian land mammal assemblages in the overlying marine and continental Topanga Formation.
 
Article
This 11th part of “Type specimens of birds in the American Museum of Natural History” includes taxa in the passerine families included in volume 14 of Peters' Check-list of birds of the world (Paynter, 1968). The original description of each name has been consulted and the currently accepted name of the taxon has been listed with reference to recent publications. The coordinates and modern names of type localities are given when found and comments on taxonomic history are provided. In this part, 352 names are treated; for 20 of these, name-bearing types are not in AMNH or were not found.This part of the type list, as well as all previous parts, are searchable and available for download from the AMNH Library website (http://digitallibrary.amnh.org/dspace/).
 
Article
We describe Paratoceras tedfordi, a new species of Protoceratidae from early Miocene amber-bearing sands near Simojovel, Chiapas, southern Mexico. The holotypic cranium weakly expresses maxillary plates, supraorbital rugosities, and a median occipital projection as in the type of Paratoceras wardi, and is interpreted as a female. Its short facial region, elongate premolars, and brachydont molars place it among the Protoceratinae, not Synthetoceratinae. We also describe new cranial and the first postcranial material of Prosynthetoceras texanus from Alum Bluff and Thomas Farm sites in Florida. Incorporating data from these new specimens, we consider highlights of protoceratid adaptive morphology including their elaborate male ossicones, tapirlike proboscis, brachydont to mesodont dentition, and limb features and proportions. We suggest that progressive protoceratids may be seen as ecological analogues of the Bushbuck of South Africa, a forest-adapted browser. Each of the three groups of horned Protoceratidae speciated allopatrically along latitudinal lines, with the northern branch becoming extinct earlier than its southern sister. Their greater proclivity toward survival in tropical latitudes explains the importance of Protoceratidae in the Gulf Coastal Plain during the Miocene, and evident higher abundance of Paratoceras in Central America.
 
Article
The morphology and dimensional parameters of the cranium and upper and lower cheek tooth dentition of the early Barstovian aged three-toed horse, Merychippus insignis, the genotypic species, are analyzed based on specimens from Echo Quarry in the Olcott Formation of western Nebraska. Specimens of early Barstovian age from the Trinity River Pit 1 quarry, Texas, and of late Barstovian age from Deep Creek, Nebraska, are utilized to corroborate the association of upper and lower dentitions of the Echo Quarry sample to Merychippus insignis. A revised definition of Cormohipparion is utilized. Cormohipparion goorisi is characterized on the basis of cranial and dental information based on material from Trinity River Pit 1, Texas (early Barstovian). Based on these species, Merychippus and Cormohipparion are distinctly different taxa.
 
Article
This catalog (published in seven parts, all released on the same day) is based on only the published literature for the Staphylinidae. Of the 32 subfamilies, the following 28 are included herein: Apateticinae, Dasycerinae, Empelinae, Euaesthetinae, Glypholomatinae, Habrocerinae, Leptotyphlinae, Megalopsidiinae, Micropeplinae, Microsilphinae, Neophoninae, Olisthaerinae, Omaliinae, Osoriinae, Oxygorinae, Oxytelinae, Phloeocharinae, Piestinae, Protactinae dagger, Proteininae, Protopselaphinae, Pseudopsinae, Solieriinae, Staphylininae, Steninae, Tachyporinae, Trichophyinae, and Trigonurinae. The Aleocharinae, Paederinae, Pselphinae, and Scaghidiinae are excluded from this edition of the catalog. References to the original citation or description are given for available family-group, genus-group, and species-group names of both extant and extinct forms. The type genus is cited for each family-group name, the type species for each genus-group name, and the type locality for each species-group name. Where appropriate, all subgenera, subspecies, or synonyms are listed for each valid name. Annotated subsequent references are presented for all names. Distributional summaries are given for each valid taxon. Full bibliographic citations are in Part VII. A short historical review, coauthored with Ales Smetana, follows the Introduction (Part I), with the main focus on biographical sketches that include many photographs. The goal of this catalog is to summarize the current state of knowledge of the family and to stimulate worldwide monographic studies.
 
Article
This catalog (published in seven parts, all released on the same day) is based on only the published literature for the Staphylinidae. Of the 32 subfamilies, the following 28 are included herein: Apateticinae, Dasycerinae, Empelinae, Euaesthetinae, Glypholomatinae, Habrocerinae, Leptotyphlinae, Megalopsidiinae, Micropeplinae, Microsilphinae, Neophoninae, Olisthaerinae, Omaliinae, Osoriinae, Oxyporinae, Oxytelinae, Phloeocharinae, Piestinae, Protactinae†, Proteininae, Protopselaphinae, Pseudopsinae, Solieriinae, Staphylininae, Steninae, Tachyporinae, Trichophyinae, and Trigonurinae. The Aleocharinae, Paederinae, Pselphinae, and Scaphidiinae are excluded from this edition of the catalog. References to the original citation or description are given for available family-group, genus-group, and species-group names of both extant and extinct forms. The type genus is cited for each family-group name, the type species for each genus-group name, and the type locality for each species-group name. Where appropriate, all subgenera, subspecies, or synonyms are listed for each valid name. Annotated subsequent references are presented for all names. Distributional summaries are given for each valid taxon. Full bibliographic citations are in Part VII. A short historical review, coauthored with Aleš Smetana, follows the Introduction (Part I), with the main focus on biographical sketches that include many photographs. The goal of this catalog is to summarize the current state of knowledge of the family and to stimulate worldwide monographic studies.
 
Article
This catalog (published in seven parts, all released on the same day) is based on only the published literature for the Staphylinidae. Of the 32 subfamilies, the following 28 are included herein: Apateticinae, Dasycerinae, Empelinae, Euaesthetinae, Glypholomatinae, Habrocerinae, Leptotyphlinae, Megalopsidiinae, Micropeplinae, Microsilphinae, Neophoninae, Olisthaerinae, Omaliinae, Osoriinae, Oxyporinae, Oxytelinae, Phloeocharinae, Piestinae, Protactinae dagger, Proteininae, Protopselaphinae, Pseudopsinae, Solieriinae, Staphylininae, Steninae, Tachyporinae, Trichophyinae, and Trigonurinae. The Aleocharinae, Paederinae, Pselphinae, and Scaphidiinae are excluded from this edition of the catalog. References to the original citation or description are given for available family-group, genus-group, and species-group names of both extant and extinct forms. The type genus is cited for each family-group name, the type species for each genus-group name, and the type locality for each species-group name. Where appropriate, all subgenera, subspecies, or synonyms are listed for each valid name. Annotated subsequent references are presented for all names. Distributional summaries are given for each valid taxon. Full bibliographic citations are in Part VII. A short historical review, coauthored with Ales Smetana, follows the Introduction (Part I), with the main focus on biographical sketches that include many photographs. The goal of this catalog is to summarize the current state of knowledge of the family and to stimulate worldwide monographic studies.
 
Article
This catalog (published in seven parts, all released on the same day) is based on only the published literature for the Staphylinidae. Of the 32 subfamilies, the following 28 are included herein: Apateticinae, Dasycerinae, Empelinae, Euaesthetinae, Glypholomatinae, Habrocerinae, Leptotyphlinae, Mega] opsidiinae, Micropeplinae, Microsilphinae, Neophoninae, Olisthaerinae, Omaliinae, Osoriinae, Oxyporinae, Oxytelinae, Phloeocharinae, Piestinae, Protactinae dagger, Proteininae, Protopselaphinae, Pseudopsinae, Solieriinae, Staphylininae, Steninae, Tachyporinae, Trichophyinae, and Trigonurinae. The Aleocharinae, Paederinae, Pselphinae, and Scaphidiinae are excluded from this edition of the catalog. References to the original citation or description are given for available family-group, genus-group, and species-group names of both extant and extinct forms. The type genus is cited for each family-group name, the type species for each genus-group name, and the type locality for each species-group name. Where appropriate, all subgenera, subspecies, or synonyms are listed for each valid name. Annotated subsequent references are presented for all names. Distributional summaries are given for each valid taxon. Full bibliographic citations are in Part VII. A short historical review, coauthored with Ales Smetana, follows the Introduction (Part I), with the main focus on biographical sketches that include many photographs. The goal of this catalog is to summarize the current state of knowledge of the family and to stimulate worldwide monographic studies.
 
Article
Prince Maximilian of Wied made important collections of reptiles and other vertebrate animals during pioneering expeditions to Brazil and North America. These were purchased for the American Museum in 1869. The present paper emphasizes Brazilian materials collected in 1815–1817. Prince Maximilian (aka Wied, Neuwied, and Prince Max) published extensively on this collection, especially in the Beiträge zur Naturgeschichte von Brasilien (“Contributions to the natural history of Brazil, 1825–1833”)—a meticulous account of the species collected—and in Abbildungen zur Naturgeschichte Brasiliens (“Illustrations of the natural history of Brazil, 1822–1832”). The unnumbered folio plates of the Abbildungen are so important, and so difficult to access, that the herpetological ones are resized and reprinted herein. These hand-colored plates are rare (only 300 of each were produced) and are reproduced herein “as is” with arbitrary plate numbers 1–56; this numbering approximates the organization of the present ...
 
9. Scanning electron microscope photos. NMV P 54039, right M1 of cf. Peroryctes sp., Large Form, shown in (A) labial, (B) posterior, (C) occlusal, (D) anterior, and (E) lingual views. Note that in C and E, the postparacrista and premetacrista almost meet in the cleft between stylar cusps C  
7. Scanning electron microscope photos of cf. Peroryctes tedfordi. NMV P 157138, the talonid of a worn right lower molar shown in occlusal view (A). NMV P 157131, right M1 shown in occlusal view (B). NMV P 54144, a lightly worn upper M2 or M3 shown in (C) labial, (D) occlusal,  
6. Scanning electron microscope photos of cf. Peroryctes tedfordi. NMV P 210912, an m2 or m3 in three views [(A) lingual, (B) occlusal, (C) antero-dorso-labial], showing the characteristic large procingulid, elongate, laterally compressed entoconid (arrows), and wide talonid. NMV P 210911, an m1 lacking much of the talonid, is shown in (D) lingual and (E) occlusal views. The arrow points to  
3. Scanning electron microscope photos. NMV P 177976, an upper canine or anterior premolar of a dasyurid or phalangerid shown in (A) anterior, (B) ?medial, and (C) posterior views. NMV
Article
New material of dasyurids, peramelids, phalangerids, pseudocheirids, burramyids, ektopodontids, and vombatids from the early Pliocene Hamilton fauna of Victoria, Australia, includes a new perameloid species and the first record of vombatids in the Hamilton fauna. The earlier interpretation of the assemblage as representing a rain forest fauna is confirmed.
 
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