British Journal of Neuroscience Nursing

Online ISSN: 1747-0307
Publications
Article
Accountability is a preparedness to give an explanation to relevant others for one's judgments, intentions, acts and omissions when called on to do so. A central tenet of professional accountability is that each nurse is personally accountable for his/her own practice. A less negative definition of accountability is proposed, through discussion of the concept of collective accountability held by the profession. The accountability of the non-specialist nurse engaged in neuroscience care is examined using a case study analysis which compares the expectations of care held by a patient and his neuroscience specialist carers. As increasing demands are placed on health services, specialist patients will be placed in non-specialist clinical areas. There is a requirement for the profession to demonstrate a collective accountability, and for specialist nurses to more actively support the accountability of their non-specialist colleagues in meeting the needs of the specialist patient.
 
Article
To date stroke prevention has concentrated mainly on weight reduction, healthy diet, control of cholesterol levels and increased exercise. Obesity also contributes to obstructive sleep apnoea/hypopnoea syndrome (OSAHS), a sleep disorder which can be treated effectively with nasal continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP). It is a disorder which is now being recognized more often in general practice and respiratory medicine. Although it is not proven unequivocally that OSAHS causes stroke, some of the symptoms would suggest that it may be a contributory factor. Both general and specialist nurses play a role in the prevention of stroke and those in hospital care are uniquely placed to observe sleeping patterns, respond to patients' questions and work with other professionals to ensure that OSAHS is treated successfully. Therefore an understanding of the recognition and management of OSAHS and its possible association with stroke is important for nurses working on medical wards and in general practice as well as specialist respiratory nurses and neuroscience nurses.
 
Article
Each stage of the nutritional process from the search for and selection of food to the eating skills required for the chewing and swallowing of oral diet can present a variety of difficulties in neurological disability. This article is an examination of the complexity of the bio-behavioural activity involved in normal eating. The assessment tools currently available to the nurse caring for patients in a variety of settings are discussed.
 
Article
This is the first in a series of seven articles that comprise an introduction to the understanding and application of ethics in the neurosciences. Neuroethics encompasses the ways in which developments in neuroscience intersect with social and ethical issues. There is no universal definition of neuroethics, although two broad categories of issues can be discerned: those emerging from what we can do and those emerging from what we know. Ethical problems follow from advances in neuroimaging, psychopharmacology, brain implants and brain-machine interfaces, but are also raised by growing understanding of the neural basis of behaviour, personality, consciousness, and transcendent states. This series of articles is intended to help practitioners explore neuroethics in their own practice. In this first article, advances in neuroscience are described and the need for ethical inquiry in the subject is discussed. Definitions of neuroethics are considered, as are implications for nursing practice. Several questions are raised, including: • Should we limit the degree to which we can use neurological information in evaluating individuals in regulatory, legal, medical or commercial contexts? • Should we undertake certain kinds of neuroscience experiments in view of the possible misuse of the results? • How should we discriminate between treatment (medication to treat depression) and enhancement (medication to improve cognition in a person of normal intelligence) • What does it mean to have a brain?
 
Article
Subarachnoid haemorrhage is a life-threatening event that presents with a number of discrete signs and symptoms making diagnosis problematic. A delay in diagnosis significantly increases morbidity and mortality and therefore places vulnerable patients at risk. Advanced nursing assessment and management is imperative to promote optimum patient outcomes and therefore decrease morbidity and mortality in acutely ill patients. In this article a case study is discussed with reference to relevant literature to explore an evidence-based approach to the nurse's role, care and management of an acutely ill neuroscience patient with subarachnoid haemorrhage. In keeping with the reflective case study approach, Gibbs's reflective cycle (1988) and case study guidelines by Aitken and Marshall (2007) are used to identify areas of effective clinical practices and identify gaps in the literature. On the basis of this evaluation, suggestions for clinical improvements are made. A reflective cycle can identify areas where clinical practice could be improved. It is hoped that this article will help nurses critically reflect on their own practice in the care and management of an acutely ill patient with subarachnoid haemorrhage.
 
Article
The European Association of Neuroscience Nurses (EANN) held its eighth quadrennial congress in Reykjavík, Iceland at the beginning of June. In its 28 years the EANN has grown from a largely western European organization to one which is reaching out to members in Eastern Europe, the Mediterranean and the Baltic. Its main meeting open to all neuroscience nurses is the quadrennial congress. It was an excellent opportunity for neuroscience nurses working in a wide variety of areas associated with the neurologically disabled to come together from all over Europe and the wider world. Present at this year's congress were specialists from units dealing with specific diseases such as stroke, Huntington's and Parkinson's disease, and neuro-oncology. Others had a more generic role across a variety of neurological disorders but were specialized by the stage of the disorder such as neurointensive care, neurosurgery, general neurology or neurorehabilitation.
 
Article
In the current climate of a rapid evolution in multiple sclerosis (MS) management, this book is an essential read for all those involved in the care and support of people with MS. The fundamental value of this textbook lies in the fact that it is up to date and is reliant on evidence-based medicine; this means that the material provided is predominantly based on the medical model of care, but the information it contains is an excellent resource that is not equalled in other MS texts.
 
Article
As the title suggests this book is all about one family's experience of living with Huntington's disease, a degenerative and incurable hereditary disease. The main author has Huntington's disease, and some of her family members each write a chapter so that there is a sense of balance for the reader. The reader does not need any knowledge of either the clinical aspects or experience of Huntington's disease as the book is written in an easy-to-read style.
 
Article
‘Person-centred care’ is a term frequently used by organizations to describe the aims and objectives of dementia care but, in reality, the term is often misused and ill-defined because the care for people with dementia, especially long-term care, is anything but person-centred. The traditional overemphasis on pathologizing dementia, based on physical brain changes and hitherto task oriented approaches, often overlooks the unique and personal human experiences and ignores the important infl uence of social and physical environments in the care and management of patients. The development of patient-centred care, in its true sense, has therefore led to a new culture in the way we look at the needs of people with dementia.
 
Article
In this useful handbook, Steve Smith provides a thorough application of the Roper Logan and Tierney Model of Nursing to caregiving in Huntington's disease.
 
Article
This is a new title in the Essential Clinical Skills for Nurses Series. The book is aimed at students and registered nurses caring for patients with neurological conditions, focusing on practical care of the patient in a nonspecialist setting. A series of case studies is used throughout the book to illustrate a number of points.
 
Article
This book explores theories about the causes of the recent rise in cases of autism and autistic spectrum disorders. Lathe offers an interesting and alternative perspective to consider as a practitioner.
 
Article
This article describes the role of the National Institute of Health Research and the development of the clinical research networks. The work of the networks and the nervous system disorders research portfolio is discussed. It describes the benefits for patients, researchers and organizations in participating in NIHR portfolio research and how working with your local network can help you unblock the blocks in getting your study open and recruiting. The article demonstrates the significant increase into nervous system disorder research studies since the inception of the networks.
 
Article
This book discusses the legal, medical and social consequences which arise when a baby or young child presents with a suspected non-accidental head injury. It discusses and incorporates empirical research. The book provides a logical and thorough overview of a complex and often emotive subject from a professional and objective stance without any obvious bias.
 
Article
This book is aimed at all health professionals who have an interest in caring for patients following a stroke. It has been put together from a collection of papers that have been published in the The International Journal of Therapy and Rehabilitation, the British Journal of Hospital Medicine and Practice Nursing in recent years. Many of these evidence-based papers contributed to the development of the National Clinical Guidelines for Stroke that were published by the Royal College of Physicians in 2004. This book aims to pull together much of the published work demonstrating a clear pathway to stroke rehabilitation.
 
Article
This book is a compilation of neuroscience articles that have been published by the British Journal of Nursing since 2004. The aim of the book was to bring together the best of the articles so as to provide an essential reference for nurses working with people with neurological problems.
 
Article
The NHS is currently drawing up a ‘roadmap’ to recovery; likewise, neuroscience nurses need to look to the future to see how services will relaunch. Sue Thomas outlines the next stages, highlighting the NHS Reset initiative, and the issues surrounding the recovery strategy from the perspective of neurology services.
 
Article
COVID-19 has had a resounding impact on the way health care and support has been delivered; multiple sclerosis services are no exception. Mavis Ayer outlines the effect of COVID-19 on her practice and explores whether the virus can act as the necessary catalyst for positive change in multiple sclerosis services
 
Article
Background Stroke is a public health concern, and the emergence of the COVID-19 virus has made the continuation of social support/rehabilitation groups for stroke survivors difficult. Many stroke survivors have been required to self-isolate for 12 weeks or more, according to government rules and regulations. This has led to the use of innovative technological platforms (eg Zoom) for delivering rehabilitation activities through ‘life after stroke’ group sessions, such as choir practice for stroke survivors. Aims The purpose of this study was to explore stroke survivors' experiences and perceptions of engaging, or choosing not to engage, in a virtual choir (VC) during the COVID-19 pandemic. Methods Eight participants were recruited from the Stroke Association Strike a Chord VC. Semi-structured interviews were conducted, and the verbatim transcriptions were analysed using thematic analysis. Findings Three main themes were identified: experience of singing in a choir; VCs and me; and yearning to sing face-to-face, with respective subthemes. The experience and perceptions presented here are intertwined. While most stroke survivors perceived the VC as a positive platform for providing a sense of belonging (community), there was a sense of yearning for face-to-face singing. Conclusions This research may offer some support for those facilitating social and meaningful virtual group activities to groups in communities that may struggle with communication and digital literacy.
 
Article
With the COVID-19 pandemic limiting face-to-face interaction, the drive for innovation and the need to develop alternative solutions to patient engagement, treatment and diagnosis has been suddenly accelerated. Sue Thomas and national and international colleagues outline a novel technological initiative launched in Italy to cope with the pressures of the pandemic, providing inspiration for similar future projects in the UK
 
Article
The impact of COVID-19 on the neurological community has been significant. At the same time, a huge amount has been learned and shared in the healthcare community through new educational models, peer support and virtual platforms. Charlie Peel unpacks both the impact and the response at a national and local level.
 
Article
The impact of COVID-19 has been, and continues to be, felt across the world. For some people the risks associated with contracting this virus are greater than others due to underlying health conditions. This article explores the impact of COVID-19 for people with Parkinson's and how specialist health services are having to change to continue to support this group of patients.
 
Article
This book is Jackie Parker's first edited book and is volume 11 in the Good Practice in Health, Social Care and Criminal Justice series, which explores topics of current concern in social and health care and the probation services. Jackie is a Brain Injury Case manager working for a North of England private practice providing case management for brain injured people. As a qualified social worker and counsellor, Jackie's background includes working with adults with mental health difficulties and head injured patients from the acute stage through to the community care. The contributors are drawn from a variety of professional specialists including, social worker, neuropsychologist, occupational therapist and legal practitioner. Despite there being only one registered nurse contributor, Carol Varley, this does not detract from the value and relevance of the information and advice offered for neurosciences nurses in this complex area of neuroscience care.
 
Article
Sexuality and MS: A Guide for Women is an invaluable resource for women with multiple sclerosis (MS) who may experience difficulties with sexual activity. It is not an in-depth exploration of sexuality and how the diagnosis of MS impacts on female sexual identity and sexuality in a wider sense.
 
Article
A meticulous and caring clinician who made a major contribution to contemporary neurosurgery and neuro-nursing practice
 
Article
Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a progressive and incurable disease. Disease-modifying therapies were the first medications to have an impact on the course of MS and interferon beta was the first to be licensed as Betaferon in 1995. Interferon beta is a high-dose, high-frequency medication which has been shown to reduce relapse rates and lesion load in active, relapsing-remitting MS. Interferon beta-1b is the only disease-modifying therapy to be licensed for use with certain secondary progressive patients, showing a small but significant slowing of disability progression. All the disease-modifying therapies are given by self-injection requiring support and training from an MS nurse, and research shows that adherence is significantly increased with nurse support. Interferon beta does not represent a cure for MS and cannot help everyone who suffers from MS but it can make a difference to daily living, removing much of the uncertainty which is normally so much a part of living with MS.
 
Article
I originally ventured out to buy this book as a stocking filler for my 19-year-old son who, like many of his generation, is not a stranger to marijuana. However, the usual delays on the London transport system resulted in my thumbing through the very expensive pages of this slim hardbacked book before it reached his stocking. I devoured this academic yet compulsive book as I would a novel, unable to release it until it was finished.
 
Article
It is the duty of health professionals to be informed about the rights and support available to patients at risk of losing their capacity to make decisions.
 
Article
Huntington's disease (HD) is a hereditary progressive neurodegenerative genetic condition that affects the basal ganglia. There is currently no cure. Disease onset is usually between 30–50 years of age and treatment is palliative over 15 years or so.
 
Top-cited authors
Mary R O'Brien
  • Retired from Edge Hill University
Catheryne Waterhouse
  • Sheffield Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust
Barbara A Jack
  • Edge Hill University
Mohamed Sakel
  • University of Kent
Sue Woodward
  • King's College London